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Accession No. . 






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San Francisco 



and C4tMmM:Ai4WERTISER 

•••••• • •••••• • •••■■• ■ .. 

'.. : •". : :. : ::..•:.: ;• :'•• 

BRITISH 

EMPIRE 

EXHIBITION 

EDITION 

1924 



Price 3,5 (.cuts 



July 5, 1924 




AN AEROPLANE VIEW OP THE HEART OF SAN FRAXCISCn'S FINANCIAL DISTRICT, SHOWING THE LIVERPOOL, 
LONDON & GLOBE INSURANCE BUILDING, BALFOUR BUILDING. MERCHANTS EXCHANGE BUILDING. STANDARD OIL 

BUILDING. AND OTHER SKYSCRAPERS. 

Protecting Entire Cities — the Fabric of NATIONAL prosperity 



IT is the function of Insurance to guard and protect the 
bulwarks of civilization — to make secure human activ- 
ities and accomplishments of ever}' kind. 

The great city of San Francisco, almost completely de- 
stroyed in the great disaster of 1906, could not have been 
easily rebuilt without the aid of in- 
surance. The Liverpool and London 
and Globe was privileged to be a 




THE Liverpool 
and London 
and Globe 

Insurance Company Limited 

pacific department 
444 California Street 
San Francisco 
CLARENCE E. ALLAN, MANAGER 



prominent factor in the work of rehabilitation and was one 
of the five principal companies out of some two hundred 
and thirty to pay all claims in full and without discount. 

The L. & L. & G. has successfully met similar tests in 
all of the great fires and disasters which have occurred in the 
United States and continues today to assume a larger and 
larger share of the insurance safe- 
guards so vital to American civic 
welfare. 



^ 



96 



^fe. 



?:m: 




EiUblUhed July 20. 1656 



FsaAKHgns 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

Inttalf Empire Exlitbtttnn Number 




Vol. CV, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY 5, 1924 



No. 1 




THE KINGS AMI QUERNS OF ENGLAND AND ROl MAMA 
VISIT THE ItltlTISH EMl'IRK EXHIBITION AT WEMBLEY. 
THE ROYAL VISITORS WEARING THE FLORAL GAR- 
LANDS WITH Willi II THEY RAD BEEN INVESTED BY 
I. AIM DALAL (WIFE OF Tin: UK. II COMMISSIONER FOR 
THE INDIAN SECTION), ON ENTERING THE lMin\ 
I- \\ II KIN 



Underwood & Underwood Photo 






SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 



British Empire Exhibition 



By Gerald Campbell 



n BLIZZARD was rag- 
ing when I visited 
the Grand Canyon, 
and a friendly guide 
took pity on "another mad 
Englishman" who, after gulp- 
ing down a welcome and de- 
licious cup of hot soup at the 
Hermit's Rest, went out to 
take photographs in the snow. 

"Won't you come in and 
get warmed up at the world's 
greatest fireplace?" he asked 
me. 

"Is that so?" I replied. 

"Well, we get travellers here 
of almost every nationality, 
and we tell them all it is. No- 
body has yet said it isn't." 

Different people, different 
habits ! 

We members of the British 
Commonwealth of Nations 
think that the British Empire 
is the greatest organization 
that the world has ever 
known, but we hesitate to tell 
people this because we like, in 
our silently flattering way. to 
imply that their education is 
already complete. Further- 
more, if we expatiated too fre- 
quently on its size, we might 
be asked, pertinently but 
awkwardly, how this greatest 
organization is stage-man- 
aged, or what is the actual 
relation between the different parts of the Empire and "The 
Mother Country," as she is still affectionately called, and 
how can we explain what we do not understand ourselves? 
All that we real- 
ize is that it has 
grown up haphaz- 
ard like Topsy in 
Uncle Tom's Cab- 
in, until it has 
developed into a 
wonderful part- 
nership of strong- 
willed partners, 
w h o w o r k to- 
gether w- i t h o u t 
a n y visible ma- 
chine r y or Ar- 
ticles of Constitu- 
tion, and whose 
loyalty to them- 
selves and to each 
other increases in 
direct ratio with 
their independ- 
ence. 

It would be out- 
side the scope of 




GERALD CAMPBELL, 



< . M. G„ H. B. 

Sun Francisco 




this article to trace the growth 
of the various Dominions 
from childhood to manhood, 
from manhood to nationhood, 
and from nationhood to equal 
nationhood, but it is of ab- 
sorbing interest to follow the 
growth and development of 
their consciousness of na- 
tional individuality during the 
century or so which has 
elapsed since the Durham Re- 
port established the principle 
that any right on which the 
Dominions insisted could not 
be refused to them, and so led 
t" the institution of respon- 
sible government in Canada. 
In that comparatively short 
time the Empire, no longer an 
abstraction, has grown to be 
a living force, mighty, power- 
ful, yet loosely knit, a com- 
bination of free nations con- 
trolling themselves, free to 
chin ise their own paths, free 
tn choose their own popula- 
tion, free to make their own 
history. 

Who can deny that a fam- 
ily in which every member de- 
sires and obtains freedom of 
actum is not entirely up-to- 
date! But even up-to-date, 
modern families like to get 
together mice in a while, and 
that is une of the big reasons 
underlying this "gathering of the clans" which is taking 
place in London this summer. It is going to be a great re- 
union, and the wise "mother" is not limiting the invitation 

to a private view 
of the ancestral 
home, but she is 
urging that every 
m e m b e r bring 
along, not a torn 
and thumb-mark- 
ed photograph al- 
bum, but a real 
live model of his 
or her handiwork, 
so that each may 
come to appreciate 
the other and 
shake hands all 
around on the vis- 
ible results of 
hard work, genius 
and other aids to 
development. And 



Consul General, 

Boye Photo 



THE CANADIAN EXHIBIT BUILDING 

Faring the Palnees of Engineering anil Industries, across Hie lake dividing Hie Exhibition, is the 
Canadian Building; the Indian Empire is at one end. 



gamzation is go- 
ing to have the 
b i s s e s t exhibi- 



luh 



l'L'4 



AND C \l.ll-'< IRNIA \DVERTISER 



tion ; at least, we tell ourselves 
ami the rest of the world it is 
the biggest and. if anyone 
doubts it — well, the best peo- 
ple do not express doubts out 
loud nowadays until they have 
had a chance to prove or dis- 
prove an assertion, so why not 
come and see the show and 
then you can, and will, talk 
ahout it afterwards. 

Take it all in all, over $200,- 
000,000 have been spent on 
making it a really worth- 
while exposition. Ten million 
dollars have been spent on the 
Amusement Park alone, in- 
cluding the Stadium which 
seats 200,000 people and is 
twice the size of Rome's 
Coliseum. It is here that an 
attraction of especial interest 
to Californians will be staged, 
namely the International Ro- 
deo, or competitive cowboy 
contests, in which there will 
be cash prizes amounting to 
$100,000 in addition to tro- 
phies worth several thousand 
dollars more. A special ship is 
being chartered to bring com- 
petitors from the United 
States and Canada with 
broncos, steers and any other 
paraphernalia the cowboys 
may require. 

The exhibition, which will 
have been opened by the time 
this gets into print, is being 
held at Wembley Park, so it 
is nice and handy to London, 
and the grounds have been fitted 
tions, fifteen miles of roads, am 

running round and through, and capable of handling 20,000 
people. This railroad has cost $4,000,000 and is the only 
one in the world to be operated without engineers or con- 
ductors. Arrangements have been made to deal with 300,- 
000 people per day and forty restaurants have been placed 
in convenient 
spots to attend to 
the inner man and 
woman. I am told 
that t h e Palace 
Hotel at San 
Francisco is or- 
ganized to f e e d 
51 KM) people in any 
one day. The Ex- 
h i b i t i o n is ex- 
pected to feed ten 

times that num- 
ber at one and the 
same lime. SO that 
any reader visit- 
ing the Exhibi- 
tion will have the 
pleasure that is all 
but pain, or the 
pain that is all but 
pleasure i u hich- 
ever wa) he has IHE austbaman 

time to look at it) Australia atom has unenl 




BARON STEVENSON <> 
Chairman of Hotinl I' 

Ut with five railroad sta- 
a "never-stop" railroad 




of watching 49,999 other mor- 
tals engaged in the nois) sat- 
isfaction of their appetites. If 
he is of an inquiring frame 
of mind and wants to know- 
how many cups, saucers and 
plates will be broken in a 
week, he must multiply the 
figure he has in mind by 12.- 
D00 to represent the number 
")f waitresses employed in the 
forty restaurants. 

But the Exposition is not 
merely a spectacular affair; it 
is not all window dressing 
though, as the British are ac- 
cused by some and compli- 
mented by others as a nation 
of shopkeepers, it is logical to 
boast that this will be the 
largest and most wonderfully 
dressed "shop window" in 
the world. Back of it all and 
underneath it all, however, 
lies the determination to pro- 
mote the recovery of British 
trade both within and without 
the Empire and that is why 
we are all supporting it heart 
and soul. I need not go into 
details because so many en- 
terprising newspapers have 
already dealt, or are dealing, 
with this greatest piece of ad- 
vertising that we have ever 
undertaken; suffice it to say 
that the whole Empire is 
sharing in the Exhibition. The 
Old Country's exhibits will be 
housed in the Palaces of En- 
gineering and Industry, solid- 
ly built of steel and concrete (the Machinery Hall alone is 
tin' largest concrete building in the world and would con- 
tain Madison Square Harden, in New York, seven times 
over); practically every branch of British manufacturing 
activity will be displayed in these two buildings, while 
nearby stands the British Government's own Pavilion with 
exhibits designed to illustrate the functions of the Home 

Government in 
the story of the 
Empire as it is to- 
day. Over $5,000.- 
000 have been 
spent by various 
Dominions a n d 
< i I'oiiies i n the 
erection of indi- 
vidual and group 
pavilions, with ex- 
h ibi t s carefully 
selected as char- 
acteristic of the 
countries they 
represent. The 
largest pavilions 
are those of .Aus- 
tralia, Canada, In- 
dia. South Africa 
and Xew Zealand, 
while special 
xMiKir lui.i.iN.. buildings have 

s,,;,,,, idiag. )fe » erected by 



' IIOUIBl'RY G. O. M. (i 
■ftlHli Empire Exhibition 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 




Lieutenant General SIR TRAVEKS E. CLARKE K. C. B.- 
Cliief Administrator 



West Africa, West Indies, Bur- 
ma. Ceylon, Cyprus, Hong- 
kong, Newfoundland, East Af- 
rica, Malaya. Malta, Palestine, 
Bermuda and Fiji. 

Americans sometimes think 
that we live too much in the 
past. Come to Wembley and 
see "a collective gesture of con- 
fidence in the future." We shall 
welcome you over there and 
we shall show you our belong- 
ings with the pleasure and 
pride of one taking a near rela- 
tive round the h ouse and 
grounds, and we shall be dis- 
appointed if you. too, do not 
tingle under the skin and re- 
ceive inspiration and incite- 
ment from the sight which will 
meet your eyes. Times have not 
been so very bright since the 
Armistice, but we are working 
for better things and we do not 
want to be dog-in-the-manger- 
ish, for the world is wide and 
healthy rivalry is the best tonic 
for a convalescent race ; indeed, 
if there had been no rivalry 
there would have been no Em- 
pire Exhibition worth inviting 
you to visit. It will be a fillip 
to your imagination, a stirrup 
cup to drain as you mount for 
another venture, you who have 
the radiant hue of youth ! 

"( rive me youth." cried Faust 
to Mephistopheles, "my body is 
in an armchair, but my spirit is 
in the stirrup !" 




DIKE OF DEVONSHIRE. K. G. 

Chairman of tlie Executive Council 
of (lie British Empire Exhibition 




A BIRD'S EVE VIEW OF THE BRITISH EYIl'IKE EXHIBITION 

Revealing toners anil domes, minarets and palace walls, bridges and Formal gardens, glimpses or China and Africa and India, reproducing 
faithfully what is in reulily an epitome of the British Empire. So beautifully and solidly has every building been curried out. that it 

will probably remain a permanent exhibition. 

— Courtesy The Cunarder, 



July 5, 1924 



AND CALIF( IRNIA ADVERTISER 




ARRIVAL OF THEIR MAJESTIES, Till 



KING AND QUEEN OF ENGLAND, TO OFFICIALLY OPEN THE BRITISH EMPIRE EXHIBITION, 
APRIL 33rd, 11124, AT WEMBLEY, ENGLAND. Underwood & Underwood Photo 



Tourist Third Cabin Throws Open the "Old World" 
The expense, heretofore the main objection to a summer 
trip abroad, is so slight under a plan inaugurated by the 
Cunard Line as to lie within the reach of all. 

It lias become the habit of people to talk of seeing how 
the "( Ither Half" lives with a despairing gesture. \ trip to 
England and the Continent conjures up in .the minds of 
most people the vision of several thousand dollars. How 
many realize that $170.00 for the steamer passage will take 
one over and back, in clean and comfortable surroundings. 
with good food and most important of all. that this can be 

done with congenial fellow-travelers'. 

The demand for accommodation across the Atlantic this 
year lias become so great that the Cunard bine has set aside 
Several steamers during the summer and early fall for the 
use of Tourist Third Cabin Passengers. The whole Third 
Class has been reserved for tourists, teachers, students, ar 
tists and professional people who will be congenial. The 



accommodation on these special sailings is strictly limited 
to this class of passenger. 

The old idea that Third Cabin is an open steerage is very 
quickly being wiped out of our minds as we come to under- 
stand what the Third Cabin is today, with its clean white 
staterooms, excellent washing facilities, abundance of clean 
linen, plenty of bath towel- and hot water at all hours. And 
the menu in a Third Cabin today can well compare with 
our im n table at home. 

Specious decks are set aside for games, exercises and 
promenades. The Third Cabin passengers have at their dis- 
posal a large Open deck forward, as well as sun decks aft. 
and long covered promenades. Steamer chairs and rugs 
tble for Third Cabin passenger-, as well as an 
assorted library. 

The Cunard Line has printed a very interesting booklet 
concerning the Tourist Third Cabin, entitled "To Europe 
and Return this Summer for $170.00. 




I'm iilttl it llillf II 



OM SRLOOKING THE EXHIBITION OHOVM.S I- THE EMPIRE STADIUM 

i„. -i,,. .,( ih- Roman Coliaenm, «<i aeeommedBtliis IS5,«HM people, U"- la u>' largest aporte 

arena in the wurld. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Tulv 5, 1924 



The English-Speaking Union for the Promotion of Peace 



By Charles Mills Gayley 



Wi 



'ARS arise from misunderstand- 
ing or from a disregard of prin- 
ciples of equity. Since 1812 be- 
tween Britons and Americans 
uninterrupted peace has prevailed. They 
have been able by conference and discussion 
to settle their differences amicably. They 
speak the same language and hold the same 
principles of equity. 

There is no reason why Briton and 
American should not understand immedi- 
ately and explicitly each what the other 
means. Sometimes, indeed, when opinions 
are colored by passion, each understands 
only too well what the other means. But 
even that makes ultimately for good. There 
is nothing like pitiless "explicity" for clear- 
ing the atmosphere. Especially between 
Britons and Americans. For using the same 
tongue, they inherit the same literature and, 
with that, the same ideals of fair play and 
justice. 

"In the union of the men of English 
speech — a union not political but philosophi- 
cal and spiritual — a union of common aims 
and ambitions, based upon a common con- 
ception of human rights, expressed in a 
speech that all understand — the strongest 
barrier against human injustice and human 
weakness can be found." So wrote Lord 
Bryce in the last book he published. "Not 
unity of racial origin," he had two years 
earlier said, "not unity of racial origin, but 
unity of language, of character and belief, 
unifying force by which Providence is holding together 
groups of peoples dwelling far apart and recruited from 
various racial stocks". 

The same thought has been on one occasion and another 
emphasized by the first president of the English-speaking 
Union of the United States, William Howard Taft. And 
by the present president of that Union, John W. Davis, 
from whom. I reproduce freely : "Though many racial strains 
flow in the blood of the American people, one speech pre- 
vails. With a common language there comes almost in- 
evitably a common set of ideals and aspirations. Our ideals 
of justice, ordered freedom, good will, and peace are the 
ideals of the other English-speaking peoples — themselves 
the product of many racial strains. Those who speak in a 
common tongue may fairly be expected to move with com- 
mon motives to a common end. To restore a stricken world 
to stability, confidence, and ordered progress, nothing will 
be of more constructive efficacy than cordial and broad- 
visioned co-operation between all of the great English- 
speaking peoples". 

An Enduring Tradition 

When in 1823 the designs of the autocratic "Holy Alli- 
ance" of European despots upon pan-American democracy 
had been denounced by Great Britain, it was Thomas Jef- 
ferson who wrote: "With Great Britain on our side we 
need not fear the world. With her, therefore, we should the 
most sedulously nourish a cordial friendship." When in 



To know the affinity of tongues 
seems to be one step toward 
promoting the affinity ot na- 
tions. — George Washington. 

The friendship of the United 
States and Great Britain is all 
that now holds the world to- 
gether. It is the greatest asset 
of civilization left . . . This 
is worth the whole zeal and en- 
ergy of all first-class, thorough- 
bred, English-speaking men. — 
Walter H. Page. 




PKOF. C. M. GAYLEY 



the mightv 



mane sentiments are manifestly the endur- 
ing spirit of the free institutions of England. 
I am sure also that the)' constitute the only 
reliable basis for free institutions through- 
out the world." When in 1921 the late War- 
ren G. Harding was President-elect this was 
his message to Great Britain : "I am im- 
pressed not so much by the glory that the 
English-speaking peoples may take to them- 
selves as by the profound duties God has 
thrust upon them — duties of being re- 
strained, tolerant, and just. These duties 
will find their greatest recognition in united 
and unshakable friendship, understanding, 
and oneness of purpose." 

Similarly, the first and present president 
of the British Society of the English-speak- 
ing Union, the Earl of Balfour, addressing 
the English-speaking Union in New York at 
the time of the Conference on Limitation of 
Armament: "Our hearts all beat in unison. 
I feel that all the great ambitions of my life 
have, as it were, reached their culmination 
on this evening. Never have I desired any- 
thing more in a long public career than that 
Americans and Englishmen, men speaking 
the same language, men inheriting the same 
literature, men living under the same laws, 
men loving the same liberty, should under- 
stand each other, should believe in each 
other, and should follow in harmonious co- 
operation all the great and unselfish inter- 
national ends which only co-operation can adequately pur- 
sue." 

Stability Through Co-operation 

The English-Speaking Union was founded in London on 
July 4, 1918, by a group of well known Americans and Bri- 
tons. It consists of sister societies, the British and the 
American, entirely independent but working to the same 
end. 

The English-Speaking Union of the United States has 
for its purpose to promote better acquaintance, mutual 
understanding, friendship, and peaceful co-operation in 
common interests between the people of the United States 
and the other English-speaking peoples throughout the 
world. Conversely, this society exists to oppose with all 
its strength any malicious or misguided persons who would 
seek to sow discord between these peoples. For — some- 
what in the words of the president of the American So- 
ciety — no greater misfortune could befall our country than 
discord with those who share our heritage of the English 
speech. No greater misfortune could befall the world. 
Hence we are drawn together by an enlightened selfishness 
on the one hand ; and on the other, by a far higher motive — 
by a sincere belief that a duty has been laid upon the peo- 
ples of the English tongue to serve mankind. 

The E.-S. U. takes it for granted that the growth of 
friendship between the English-speaking peoples in no way 
implies or produces unfriendly relations between these peo- 
ples and those of other lands and tongues. The growth 



1863 the "plain people" of England sent friendly assurance of such friendship makes for reciprocal good will among the 
to Lincoln of their sympathy with his proclamation of nations and lasting benefit to all. Hence the two-fold 
emancipation, this was his reply: "Your exalted and hu- motto of the Union: "To draw together in the bond of 



fulv 5, 1924 



AND CALIF< >RNIA ADVERTISER 



comradeship the English-speaking peoples of the world. 
One tongue unites ns for humanity." 

The word "Union" in the name of the organization con- 
veys merely the idea of fellowship. It is a Society of Eng- 
lish-speaking Friends of Peace. It is an organization based 
on individual membership. It has nothing to do with poli- 
tics. It is non-racial and non-sectarian. It aims at no fed- 
eration, no alliance. It is not connected with governments. 
Membership is open to men and women alike who are in 
sympathy with the objects of the society, and membership 
does not in any way conflict with the duties of good citi- 
zenship. Each member's first duty is, of course, to the 
country to which, as subject or citizen, he owes allegiance. 

The unbroken peace that has prevailed for more than a 
century and the three thousand five hundred miles of un- 
armed frontier between the United States and Canada are 
symbols of the informal bond that holds together the Eng- 
lish-speaking peoples, independent and free. The sacred 
task to which members of the English-Speaking Union set 
their hands is to perpetuate and develop the existing sense 
of comradeship and brotherhood, and thus ensure peace for 
themselves and promote peace among all peoples. 

This broad purpose the E.-S. U. of the United States, in 
co-operation with the British Society, aims to accomplish 
through a wide variety of practical means, including espe- 
cially the following : 

It establishes cordial relations with Britishers residing in 
this country who believe in the principles of free govern- 
ment on which their institutions and ours jointly rest, and 
with English-speaking residents of other nationalities who 
hold those principles in like esteem. It welcomes and as- 
sists in kindly ways properly accredited visitors to the 
United States who speak the English language and are in 
sympathy with the purposes of the Union. It interchanges 
with Branches of the Union all over the world speakers, lec- 
turers, students, teachers, authorities in international, eco- 
nomic, commercial, and juridical affairs, journalists, preach- 
ers and other representatives. It encourages reciprocal 
travel and study tours. It conducts inquiries and endorses 
publications intended to disseminate accurate information, 
correct prejudices, and promote co-operation. It furnishes 
free of cost to all its members the Bulletin of the American 
Society and, to those who in taking out membership indi- 
cate their desire to receive it. The Landmark, the monthly 
publication of the sister society of the British Empire. These 
publications seek to bring the members of both organiza- 
tions into touch with the various parts of the English- 
speaking world. Their contents include articles and ad- 
dresses by men and women known wherever English is 
spoken. 

Activities of the American Society 

In America three or four Branches or Chapters were es- 
tablished in 111". Among them, the California Branch under 
its present management. These nuclei were consolidated 
in l'»20 by the incorporation of a national American organi- 
zation. The lead was taken b) former President Taft in 
company with the Hon. Myron T, Herrick, the Hon. George 
W. Wickersharn, Major George Haven Putnam. Mr. Paul 1 ». 
Cravath and other prominent Americans. On his appoint- 
ment to the Chief Justiceship of the Supreme Court, Mr. 
Taft resigned the presidencj of the Society and was suc- 
ceeded by the Hon. John W. 1 > a v i - . Ambassador to the 
Court of St. lames under the late Democratic Administra- 
tion and now President of the American Bar Association. 

The American Society has National Headquarters in New 
York (34S Madison Wenue). The Branches and Chapters, 
some thirty in number, reach from the Atlantic coast to 
California and Hawaii. These centres have entertained 
many distinguished Britishers and Americans devoted to 
the cause. Among those who have addressed meetings. 
wherever possible open to the public, are ambassadors, ex- 
premiers, and other high officials representing Great Bri- 



tain. Canada. Australia. Xew Zealand. South Africa, and 
India. Also Americans of national and international repu- 
tation. 

The California Branch consists of a central group in San 
Francisco, a Southern District of Los Angeles and Pasa- 
dena, and three other chapters. These have had the privi- 
lege of welcoming Lord Shaw of Dunfermline, ex-premier 
Hughes and Senator George F. Pearce of Australia, ex- 
premier Sir RobertBorden and Sir George Perley of Canada, 
Sir Harry Lauder, Consul General Gerald Campbell, Chief 
Justice Taft, former Justice Clarke of the Supreme Court, 
John W. Davis. George W. Wickersharn. Admiral Sims. Ad- 
miral Simpson, General Morton, other officers of our Army 
and Navy, and still other American and British visitors. 

The methods outlined above for the promotion of mutual 
understanding and co-operation are in effect and working 
with steadily increasing- success. 

The British Society 

The British Society headed by Lord Balfour, has general 
Headquarters at 1 Charing Cross, London, and offices or 
representatives in some twenty-five centres in Great Bri- 
tain, on the Continent, and in the British Commonwealths 
overseas. A Common Interests Committee, of which the 
Viscountess Bryce is president and the Hon. Mrs. Alfred 
Lyttelton, D. B. E., chairman, has in operation an admir- 
able system whereby American visitors may see at first 
hand something of the educational, industrial, business and 
professional life of the United Kingdom. Besides conducting 
visitors to chief points of interest it arrang-es access to cen- 
tres of social and industrial activity and to interesting places 
in London and the Counties, not usually open to the pub- 
lic ; also when possible to debates in the Houses of Parlia- 
ment. 

In view of the fact that this summer many Americans 
will lie visiting the British Empire Exposition or attending 
the joint meeting of the Advertising Clubs, or of the 
Bar Associations, now is a favorable time to make the ac- 
quaintance of the American Society of the E.-S. U. and. 
through it, of the British Society. A Card of Introduction 
from any of the American Branches will ensure the visitor 
a welcome at the British Headquarters and at the offices of 
the British Society throughout the world. Hundreds of our 
members have received invaluable aid not only of the kinds 
mentioned above, but in finding suitable acommodations. 
They have also been recipients of generous British hos- 
pitality both in the British Isles and at the various offices 
on the Continent. 

Any reader of this communication who may be interested 
has only to address the Honorary Secretary of the English- 
Speaking Union, California Branch, 333 Kearny Street, San 
Francisco, and further information will be supplied. 

The Power of Public Opinion 

The war or peace of the future rests not in the hands of 
blocs or parties or irresponsible interests, not upon the 
chance of a diplomatic blunder, nor in the will of a head- 
strong parliament or council or autocrat. It rests in the 
intelligent sentiment of the people. We seek the co-opera- 
tion of poor and rich alike of every blood, creed, party, pro- 
fession, industry. The E.-S. U. is thoroughly democratic 
from bottom to top. and the membership fee is, and will be 
kept, low enough to admit anyone who is in sympathy with 
the objects sought and desirous of helping in their fulfil- 
ment. We hope that all elements of the population of the 
United States will join hands in this movement of friend- 
ship. Nearly every one whether he has or has not heard 
of the existence of the English-Speaking Union is of its 
faith — by instinct or conviction. No one. it has been well 
said, who has contemplated a world gone to pieces can have 
failed to discover that the only great pieces inherently un- 
broken in the catastrophe are the English-speaking peoples. 
Everv thinking man and women must realize that the ob- 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 



vious course for us who have inherited the English speech, 
is to take hold of the thing not only where it is most pro- 
mising, but where it is most obviously our task: that it is 
our duty to fit together these larger pieces and try to re- 
build the structure, beginning with them. 

From small beginnings only four or five years ago the 
sister societies have now enrolled nearly twenty thousand 
members. And membership is steadily multiplying. The 
longer the roll of those who are ready to come forward and 
declare their faith in the principles here enunciated, the 
greater their influence. Let us consolidate and organize 
this friendly sentiment, and bring it constructively to bear 
in helping to restore and maintain the peace and well-being 
of the world. It goes without saying that an impressive 
demonstration of public sentiment would carry weight and 
conviction of itself. 

Present members can render no more timely and substan- 



of the literature of the English language, became voluntary 
partners with the English in the realm of Great Britain. 
That linguistic union was the first step toward the expan- 
sion of England into a World Empire. 

There followed the period of colonization, and with it a 
similar process; particularly in North America. After a 
bitter war, the United States separated from the mother 
country. The two nations since then have been at times 
political antagonists. There still exist and probably will 
exist causes of controversy between them and likewise be- 
tween Britain and her self-governing commonwealths over- 
seas. But the cultural connection between these countries 
has never been broken, and their common language and 
common literature give them a common attitude toward the 
world, in spite of all their temporary and local differences. 

Now for Dr. Arnold Schroer's conclusion — brought down 
to date in figures and terminology. It is of tremendous 




GENERAL VIEW OF THE CANADIAN BUILDING AND INDI. 

tial service than by enlisting recruits from among friends 
and acquaintances. 

One Tongue Unites Us for Humanity 
In a short sketch entitled Literary Language as a Poli- 
tical Force, written two years ago for the Kolnische Zeit- 
ung, a distinguished German thinker, of the German Uni- 
versity of Cologne, opens with two statements — "Language 
is more than anything else an expression of national think- 
ing and feeling. National culture and ideals as we appre- 
hend them through a common language transcend race and 
are transferable to every race". He then shows how a little 
kingdom, born fourteen hundred years ago in the south of 
England, expanded into a World Empire. How the lan- 
guage advancing toward perfection as a literary medium of 
ideas and aspirations — legal, political, moral, religious, ar- 
tistic — imperceptibly conquered surrounding and aggres- 
sive peoples. How at last the oldest of these racial foes, 
Scotland, succumbing" to the charm and power of the 
literary speech of Geoffrey Chaucer, greatest English poet 
of the middle ages, began to adopt the southern English 
traditions and ideals of that literature. Flow two centuries 
later when Shakespeare was king, the Scots, unconsciously 
and peacefully won over by the cultural and political ideals 



\"S II. ION EKO.H OVER THE LAKE. 



CMI'IKE EXHIBITION. 



import. All the more convincing, as the deliberate utter- 
ance of a German, earnest, thoughtful and politically in- 
formed : 

It is no long'er possible for other languages to com- 
pete on equal terms with a civilized tongue that is al- 
ready spoken by 175,000,000 human beings — a tongue 
that is the political binder which cements into a gov- 
ernmental whole 568,000,000 nationals and wards of the 
English-speaking Powers, and that affords them their 
only access to higher culture. The posterity of smaller 
nations can never overtake in numbers the descendants 
of 175,000.000 members of a vigorous and growing race. 
And it is language as an art. as a literary medium, that 
will for all time to come bind these multiplying multi- 
tudes together. Let us hope, in the interest of human- 
ity, it will also lead them toward constantly higher 
levels of civilization. 

Let us more than hope; let us work. The English speech 
is the political binder of one-third of the population of the 
globe. What of the destiny of the peoples that speak it? 
What of their responsibility? What of their potency, 
spiritually united, their efficacy to bless the nations, to re- 
store and maintain on earth peace, goodwill toward men.' 



July 5, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 




The British Empire Exhibition, Wembley, Eng. 



INIW.V COIRT. 



Tiif nrtJntta beauties And lh« JAMA MAs.im 
hi Delhi, 

RING'S UATB, r replica of one of the numerous gates in Lon- 
don, through which Mic Kings of England have paaaed, on thelx 
triumphant return hrom war. 

CI PR! S PmTlllon designed in tlie familiar style of the 
Fust Mediterranean. 



WEST AFRICA nn exact replica of :» Walled Cttj of 

and the Gold Coast. 

MALAY supplies more than half the world's supply of 
HONG KONG reproduces a native street with Chinese l 



robber. 
t work. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 



See Canada at Wembley 



By E. L. Chicanot 



w 



"HAT interest has the United States in the Brit- 
ish Empire Exhibition being held at the present 
time in London, England? The average Ameri- 
can, abruptly faced with this question, might 
be prompted to thoughtlessly and off-handedly answer : 
"None." Yet, contradicting him, are the many vessels 
steaming down the St. Lawrence River from Montreal and 
Quebec, as well as leaving from American Atlantic ports, 
crowded to capacity and with more than their accustomed 
quota of United States citizens, bound primarily for the 
exhibition at Wembley Park. They are not all merely the 
tourists and sightseers which each year Europe welcomes 
with open arms, but among them are to be found business 
men and executives, industrialists, capitalists, engineers and 
others with whom a midsummer transatlantic vacation has 
a special significance. 

The British Empire Exhibition is, of course, the major 
world attraction of the year. The very complete microcosm 
at Wembley Park is the Mecca of all nations in 1924. It is 
the natural point of focus for all European holiday-makers 
this year who at other times would be generally distributed 
over the continent. But it is a great deal more than this, 
as the quality of the composition of the steamship passenger 
lists would augur. It has a peculiar bearing on the future 
of relations, economic and sentimental, between the Great 
Republic and the British Empire, and on what these two 
great national entities stand for in world stability and pros- 
perity. More pertinently, it is expected to work for the yet 
more cordial neighborliness and more utter completeness 
of understanding between the United States and Canada. 

As a mere spectacular exhibtion, Wembley would be im- 
mensely worth while just now. Never, it is claimed, was a 
similar event conceived on such elaborate scale and such 
massive proportions, a result which was only efifected at a 
cost of £10,000,000. Massive, stately buildings bring to- 
gether the varied architecture of East and West, and varied 
colors are blended there, from the sombre tints of the North 
American continent to the brilliant hues of the Orient. 
Most absorbing in interest are the human multitudes gath- 
ered there from the corners of the earth and the outposts of 
Empire. 

For the first time in history the British Empire, and all 
that it is and stands for, has been reproduced in miniature 
so that within a short space of time the visitor can, if he 
desires, saturate himself in atmosphere, feast his eyes, and 
absorb a knowledge that would otherwise necessitate 
months and years of travel. From Canada to Australia and 
New Zealand is but a step ; a few minutes more and he is 
in Malaya or Burma; in the space of an hour he can, with 
equal facility visit India, Hong Kong, New Zealand and a 
number of other British Dominions and possessions. Each 
minute is a completer lesson in geography than months 
could otherwise impart. If, out of knowledge comes under- 
standing and sympathy, the American should be drawn 
closer to the people of the Empire and the common ties 
which bind the two peoples be but tightened. 

The business man and industrial developer has another 
interest in the exhibition. To him it is the Empire's shop 
counter where are exhibited the wares they have to sell, 
where are suggested the commodities he can sell them. The 
United Kingdom and the United States are the two great 
trading nations of the world today, accounting for approxi- 
mately one-half of the world's total trade. Furthermore, the 
business of the Republic with the British Empire in general 
has of recent years been increasing at a quite remarkable 
rate. This is of peculiar significance to the industrial and 



economic relations of the future between the United States 
and Canada. 

Few people realize the extent of business carried on at 
the present time between the LTnited States and the British 
Empire. In the past year, for instance, the United States 
bought from the United Kiugdom to the extent of $436,- 
985,000 and sold to the extent of $823,398,600. The trade 
with Canada is continually growing, exports now amount- 
ing to $658,204,000 and imports to $411,254,000. There is a 
vast trade with Hong Kong, the United States purchasing 
to the extent of $372,507,000, whilst selling to the extent of 
$212,975,900. A surprising amount of business is transacted 
with the British East Indies, imports from those countries 
amounting to $287,778,141 and exports to them $35,725,000. 
Total trade with Australia amounts to about $150,000,000; 
with British Africa to $67,000,000; to New Zealand, $50,- 
000.000; and to the West Indies and Bermuda, $42,000,000. 

This trade with the British Empire comprises only those 
exports which leave through American channels and takes 
no cognizance of a new and increasingly important trade 
factor particularly beneficial to the United States in which 
Canada plays an increasingly important role. What United 
States business interests are exporting to the countries of 
the British Empire under Canadian label, cannot be deter- 
mined to any approximate extent, but the trade is enormous 
and increasing at a substantial rate each year. 

An awakening to a realization of the value of British Em- 
pire markets for the expansion of American trade came 
slowly with the extension of the preferences accorded to one 
British country trading with another. The United States 
was situated to peculiar advantage to engage in this trade. 
The barrier separating the Republic from Canada is merely 
an economic one, and the natural step was to cross over and 
manufacture in Canada to obtain Canadian preferences in 
shipping goods to the countries of the British Empire. Since 
the war this movement has progressed with tremendous 
impetus. By the establishment of a branch plant in Canada 
the American manufacturer nullifies the tariff operating 
against him and secures all Canadian trade advantages. 
From a small beginning, a few years ago, establishment of 
this kind has so progressed that it is estimated that there 
are now more than one thousand branch plants of American 
firms in Canada, and many Dominion industries have been 
largely built up through this means. 

This makes the Empire Exhibition of peculiar sig- 
nificance as affecting the business relations between Canada 
and the United States. Paradoxical as it may sound, the 
American may see Canada more comprehensively at Wem- 
bley than by actually visiting the Dominion. Canada is a 
vast domain, covered adequately with difficulty, its re- 
sources scattered and information upon them widely dis- 
seminated. No more comprehensive display of Dominion 
possessions, developed and undeveloped, has ever been 
drawn together than at Wembley Park, where the Ameri- 
can visitor can form the best impression of Canadian wealth, 
industrial possibilities, outlets for capital, facilities of all 
kinds and other opportunities. Experts on every branch 
are in attendance to give reliable and authentic information. 
Instead of spending weeks traveling over the Dominion and 
securing an inadequate store of knowledge, he has all Cana- 
dian wealth paraded before him in a concentrated but com- 
plete manner in a few buildings. 

But it is not merely an economic exhibition with material 
aims and ends. It exists also to bring together the wide- 
flung constituents of the British Empire and to bind in 
greater unity and harmony, for future world peace and 



Jul) 



1"_M 



AND CALIF( IRNIA ADVERTISES 



13 



stability, the great English-speaking nations of the world. 

With all <luc modesty, il can be safely said that the United 
States and the British Empire are the two great forces in 
the world today, the two great influences on popular trend. 
A greater mutual understanding of the two great national 
entities is fraught with the utmost significance to the world's 
future in every respect. 

As far as Canada and the United States are concerned, 
their relations in every respect have for years stood an ex- 
ample of perfect amicability to neighbors the world over. 
If the British Empire Exhibiton can do anything more to 
cement this friendlinesss, to make this mutual understand- 
ing yet fuller and completerit, will have fully justified 
itself as far as these two countries are concerned. The Do- 



chests, and the chariot wheels just as the) were Found in 
the Luxor tomb; and at the entrance arc- the two black 
guardians of the inner shrine. 

One of the most remarkable objects in the "tomb" is 
the King's "tailor's dummy." To save himself the trouble 
of being measured and fitted for his clothes, Tutankhamen 
had a reproduction of himself made from his exact measure- 
ments, on which his clothiers fitted all his new clothes. This 
dummy has been reproduced even to the pinholes made by 
the fitters. 



A New Way To Tour Europe 

_ The Old Reliable Cunard Line has issued a very attrac- 
tive booklet, entitled "Drive Your Own Car in Europe", 




KMI'IRI! EXl 



IlilTION. WEJlItl.EY. 

r\\ ii. 



WALKING UNDER OI.II LONDON BRIDGE TOWARDS THE CANADIAN PACIFIC 
ION. SHOWING THE st Mill M on THE LEFT. Taken by The Times staff Photographer 



minion, as an integral part of the great British Empire, 
would like to sec this same sympathetic understanding, this 
same cordiality of relationship, this same neighborly friend- 
liness between the great Republic and the Empire as a 
whole as between it and its neighbor to the north. As the 
two greatest or world forces, in whose hands largely lie the 
future of (his much wracked world, it is to be hoped that 
the British Empire Exhibition will forge yet stronger bonds 



Luxor To Wembley 

A remarkable reproduction of Tutankhamen's tomb at 
Luxor has been constructed by experts for display at the 
British Empire Exhibition at Wembley. 

\\ onderful chairs of ivory and ebony, fearsome elongated 
lions and cows, golden chariots, chests, armed black slaves 
— all have been faithfully i:o\> 

The "tomb" has three chambers, each the exact size of 
the original. In an ante-room are the golden couches, the 



which is written by a New York business man who recently 
toured England and the Continent in his own machine. 

He has set down in this booklet some verv interesting in- 
formation as to the possibility of taking your car to Europe 
and back, and touring the European countries at an ex- 
ceptionally moderate cost. 

The difficulty in the past has been that people visiting 
Europe have feared taking their own car on account of 
the main- difficulties, such as packing, customs fees, dam- 
age to the car. driving license, etc.. but to take care of these 
difficulties the Cunard Bine has made arrangements to take 
the passenger's car on their docks and handle all details, 
such as crating, securing licenses, etc.. even to unpacking 
the ear at the other end and cleaning and polishing it and 
tilling it with gasoline, ready to lie driven from the Cunard 
dock for a tour of England. 

The simplicity of doing this and the actual cost are all 
given in the booklet referred to. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 



New Zealand: A Dominion of Prosperity and Charm 



By H. Stephenson Smith 

Ne*w Zealand Government Agent 



N 



south, 



History : 



'£W ZEALAND, the furthermost outpost of the 
British Empire, is situated between the thirty- 
fourth and the forty-seventh parallel of south lati- 
tude, lying slightly east of north, and west of 
covering some eleven hundred miles in extreme 
length, with an average breadth of about one hundred and 
fifty miles It is composed of two large, and one small island, 
and numerous island dependencies. The entire group are 
of volcanic and coral origin. The territory of New Zealand 
proper, consists of abottt one hundred and three thousand 
square miles. 

It is now generally accepted as a fact that the discovery 
of these beautiful and fertile islands was first made by the 



strong testimony to the progressive ability of its inhabi- 
tants. From a wild, uncultivated country, peopled by a 
savage race, it has already evolved into a Dominion of 
prosperity wherein all the acquirements and advantages 
of advanced modern civilization obtain, endowing its in- 
habitants with happiness and contentment. 

New Zealand today is a country of extreme fertility and 
of a scenic charm that has no competitor. It has moun- 
tains that challenge the attractions of Switzerland, fjords 
that outclass Norway, thermal wonders that eclipse those 
of the Yellowstone or of Hawaii, lakes and rivers (all teem- 
ing with fish) whose exceeding beauty is not excelled in 
any land or any portion of the world, and it is not alone a 
scenic paradise, but, also a paradise for the sportsman, deer 




THE FORESTS 
AND RIVERS OK 
NEW ZEALAND 
ARE OF 
WONDERFUL 
IIE.M TV. 



celebrated navigator, Abel Tasman, in the year 1642, while 
upon an exploration voyage from Java, first sighting the 
glittering peaks of the "Southern Alps", later landing at 
Massacre (now Tasman) Bay, at the north end of the South 
Island. These beautiful islands basked in the mists of 
obscurity for nearly one hundred and twenty years, until 
they were visited by the intrepid navigator. Captain Cook, 
in the year 1769, and again in 1772. The islands were sub- 
sequently visited and exploited by numerous adventurers of 
various nations, until 1825, when the original "New Zealand 
Company" of adventurers landed a shipment of settlers. The 
islands continued a sort of "free-for-all" existence until 1840, 
when Great Britain finally assumed the sovereignty by 
right of treaty with the war-like race of natives (Maories), 
who then possessed the country. 

The islands were granted self government in 1852. and 
thereafter functioned as a unit of the British Empire. 

Progress: 

The progress of the Dominion of New Zealand in the 

eighty-four years that have elapsed since Britain obtained 

control, has, considering its small population and its isolated 

position from the world center, been a record that bears 



(six or eight varieties), moose, elk, rabbits, ducks, geese, 
turkeys, quail, wild pigeons, grouse and pheasants in count- 
less millions are obtainable, while Rainbow and Brown 
trout ("ver twenty pounds in weight), and Quinalt salmon, 
are to be found in almost every river and lake in enormous 
quantities. 

New Zealand is a principality in itself and is situated 
twelve hundred miles from the Commonwealth of Australia 
(with which it is too often confused) and from which it is 
an entirely distinct country. Its fauna, its flora, its original 
inhabitants, and climatic conditions, are entirely and dis- 
tinctly different. New Zealand holds nothing in common 
with its Big- Brother Australia, but its common heritage of 
the Tasman Sea, and the Pacific Ocean, and its close ties 
of blood and kindred. 

What this wonderful country lacks most of all, is popu- 
lation, there only being some one million two hundred and 
seventy thousand white, and sume fifty-three thousand five 
hundred native, inhabitants now resident there, and in a 
country that is capable of sustaining a population of twenty 
million people in comfort. 

It is not generally recognized that the people of New 
Zealand are the nearest English-speaking race of any size, 



fuly 5, 1924 



AXI) C VLIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



1? 



(aside from Canada). to tin- territory of the United States 
and, while New Zealand is remote from the beaten track 
of the world's commerce, yet is dail) becoming less isolated, 
fast steamers (electrically propelled) will fast annihilate 
space and bring New Zealand to the world's markets. Al- 
ready an ordinary light-powered steamer from \'ew Zealand 
has reached the port of San Francisco in fifteen days steam- 
ing. When the great Pacific Ocean comes to its own, as it 
surely will, in a few decades of the future, then this little 
country will stretch out its hands of friendship and alliance 
with the Great Republic founded by its ancestors and con- 
stitute one of those factors which will, in the future, rule 
the destinies of the Pacific Ocean as a "White Man's" High- 
way. 

The forests, rivers and lakes of New Zealand are wonder- 
full}- beautiful and of large area, the foliage of the former 
ever changing in variety and hue. The banks of the rivers, 
lakes and cliffs, are covered by masses of the most beauti- 
ful ferns of never-ending variety and, in many cases, so 
dense is this growth that for miles along the river banks 
the precipitate cliffs are entirely obscured, and it would 
appear as if you are voyaging through a tunnel of verdure. 
There is not an animal, reptile, or insect in the dense under- 
growth in any way detrimental to the health or comfort of' 
humanity. 

The Fjord Lands of the West Coast, are in an inland sea 
of indescribable beauty. The fathomless depth of crystal 
water permits the largest vessel in the world to moor to 
the sides of the beetling cliffs. The denizens of the deep 
can be discerned swimming fathoms below. The verdure- 
clothed cliffs rise perpendicularly, and merge with the 
snow-clad mountain tops miles above from which fall in- 
numerable cascades — an awe-inspiring sight. 

The Thermal District of the North Island, covering about 
one hundred and fifty by twenty miles and having two ac- 



tive and several extinct volcanoes, is a scene of wonder and 
grandeur, not equalled in any other part of the world, and 
consists of geysers, boiling springs and lakes, fermoles and 
mineral springs without number. The world has no dupli- 
cate. 

Future : 

Now what of the future of this gem of the Southern 
Seas? It would take a seer of no mean ability and super- 
human imagination to forecast the destiny of this marvelous 
little Dominion, and to assign to it a place in the world's 
future. Its position on the Tasman Sea on one side, and 
the Pacific Ocean on the other, with its 4..300 miles of sea- 
board, would seem to be mandatory to become a maritime 
nation when it arrives at its growth. Then, with its ever 
present and innumerable cascades capable of producing 
countless millions of horse-power for hydro-electric energy 
when practically applied, what are its possibilities? A 
country inhabited by a virile race of white men who have 
progressed so far against all adverse conditions of settle- 
ment and of remoteness from the world's civilization, can- 
not now stay its progress towards completion of its na- 
tural destiny and must perforce, and must become an im- 
portant factor in the Empire of the Southern Seas. 

New Zealand, nestling under the effulgence of the South- 
ern Cross is the "Brightest Jewel in the Diadem of Great 
Britain" — may her footsteps on the sands of time only be 
eliminated by the waves of prosperity. 



— The bridegroom and the best man were at the altar 
awaiting the bride. The former became very white and 
seemed about to faint. "What's wrang wi ye, Jock?" asked 
the best man ; "yer face is like chalk. Ha'e ye lost ony- 
thing? Ha'e ye lost the ring?" "No," came the reply, "but 
I doot I've lost my enthusiasm." 



Sm3€mM ! i kt^M^JSSseM^sX^M^- i -igEgMS^ 





TO LONDON 



VIA 



CUNARD and ANCHOR LINES 



An < Ippi irtunitj i if a I .ifetime 
To Visit the British Empire Exhibition 



SPEND YOUR VACATION ABROAD 

Saul for Special Booklets 

"TO EUROPE AND RETURN FOR $170" 
and "DRIVE YOUR OWN CAR ABROAD" 

CUNARD and ANCHOR LINES 

501 Market Street, San Francisco, or Local Agent. 



■':': 






3-rH^K- 



=£K5!rM5=^ 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Tulv 5, 1024 



Motoring in Britain 



By E. V. Weller 

National Automobile Club 



THE American tourist, having been 
accustomed to enjoying his motor 
car in tours about his home district 
in tha United States, often feels at a 
loss on arriving on the Continent when 
he is deprived for the time being of this 
means of transportation. 

The steamship companies have now de- 
veloped an economical method of trans- 
porting motor cars to the Continent under 
bond, which permits of the operation of the 
tourist's automobile at a minimum of ex- 
pense during the period of his stay. 

A motor car in England offers a wonder- 
ful field of touring to the American. In the 
first place, the rolling hills and the heaths of 
England crop up on almost every page of 
our literature. We find the Lake District 
as the theme of poems by Wordsworth, 
Southey and Coleridge, and we gain an in- 
sight into the works of these great writers by visiting the 
scene of their inspiration. 

One of the most popular of the tours in England is that 
which starts from London and covers a great deal of the 
historical ground from that point to Liverpool, then follows 
the post road north to Keswick and the district of the Lakes 
by way of Skiddaw and the lowlands of Scotland to Inver- 
ness, the northernmost port of the Islands. A side trip, to 
include Iona and Staffa, provides an interesting variant from 
the main route. 

Perhaps, if we should follow on our ideal tour of Eng- 
land the footsteps of John Keats, we would take in a great 
deal of the country, which has been the inspiration of poets 
since the days of Chaucer and which has made a great im- 
pression upon the literature of America as well. 

In the early days of the last century John Keats and his 
friend Brown took the stage at London from the Swan 
and Two Necks in Lad Lane and proceeded by slow coach 
to Liverpool. This popular route to Liverpool, the only 
main highway in use at that particular time, was known 
as the Holy Head. The first four miles out of London is 




EARLE V. WELLER 



paved and the remainder of the surface, as 
far as the town of Coventry, is very good. 
A few hills are encountered near St. Al- 
bans, where it might prove interesting to 
the tourist to visit this famous battlefield of 
the civil wars. 

Keats and Brown, on their first day's 
journey, had luncheon at Redbourne, five 
miles from the town of St. Albans. 

There are interesting things all along the 
way which invite a halt and an investigation 
of the various relics which are preserved. At 
Coventry there are some magnificent old 
churches and the Kenilworth castle to be 
seen. 

From Coventry to Liverpool, a few miles 
of the way is rather bumpy, but to an 
American tourist the road would seem to 
present a splendid surface. The principal 
objects of interest on this last portion of 
the way to Liverpool are the old manors and the pretty 
agricultural districts in the vicinity of Cheshire. 

The town of Liverpool itself provides an interesting dav's 
sightseeing, and then the route leads north to Preston with 
pavement all the way. The country outside of Liverpool 
on this stage of the journey has little of interest, and for 
this reason Keats and Brown made the trip by stage, start- 
ing their hiking excursion from the town of Lancaster. 

One of the most interesting portions of the journey north 
is that which lies between Kendal and Keswick. The road 
is of excellent construction, somewhat hilly to the banks 
of Windermere and then of a rolling character to Grass- 
mere. The principal object of interest on this thirty-mile 
journey between Kendal and Keswick is Rydal Mount, the 
home of Wordsworth, at which Keats called during his trip 
to the lake. From this point on the landscape presents a 
series of beautiful panoramas, with Skiddaw forming the 
backdrop of the scene and the mirror-like, placid waters of 
Derwent reflecting the quaint landscape of the foreground. 
The tourist may spend a number of days to advantage in 
this vicinity as every inch of ground is hallowed with ro- 




KANK OF ENGLAND AND ROYAL EXCHANGE, LONDON, ENGLAND 



1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



mantic associations, ami perhaps the best guide to the 
points of interest about the lake may be found in Words- 
worth's "Prelude" ami "Excursion." 

Before visiting this region the tourist should familiarize 
himself with the journal of Dorothy Wordsworth, sister of 
the poet, in which he will find the changing seasons ade- 
quately portrayed in simple style. 

The next stage of the journey takes the tourist into the 
lowlands of Scotland. It is approximately sixty miles from 
Keswick, which might be called the center of the "Lake" 
district, to Dumfries, which was at one time the haunt of 
Robert Burns, and the district around Dumfries is of an 
entirely different character from that which one encoun- 
ters in the northern part of England. The character of the 
country in the lowlands of Scotland is bleak and desolate 
and startling in its contrast to the rolling, green hills of 
Northumberland. 

After visiting the birthplace of Burns and the interesting 
landmarks in that vicinity we might follow again the foot- 
steps of Keats along the road to the coast, wdiere the poet 
and his companion made a crossing to Belfast and paid a 
brief visit to the north of Ireland. 

The trip then may be resumed to Ayr and Glasgow. This 
passes through a country of magnificent prospects, with the 



famous passages in all poetry the lines from the Od 
the Nightingale: 

"Charmed magic casements 
I Ipening on the foam of perilous seas 
In faery lands forlorn." 

The ode was written shortly after his return, and the pic- 
ture of the enchanted castle on the craggy heights above 
the sea in the poem may have been inspired by the ruined 
walls on Staffa, as well as the "Enchanted Castle" of Claude 
Lorraine. 

From Oban to Inverness the traveller finds himself in the 
Highlands of Scotland. It is a district of beautiful farms, 
picturesque valleys, rural attractions of every variety, to- 
gether with bleak hills and rugged mountains that inspire 
awe. 

From Iverness the motorist may either ship his car by 
packet back to London or return through Edinburgh, the 
old English town of York and through Sheffield and Derby 
to Leicester and London. 

One of the attractive features of a tour such as this in 
England is the fact that the motorist has no worries over 
the possible road conditions ahead of him. What the aver- 
age English traveller considers a difficult piece of road 
would be considered easy going by the American motorist. 




NcImhi Monument 



TRAFALGAR SQUARE, LONDON, ENGLAND 
<;r 1 Hotel 



roar of the breakers on (he North Atlantic shores furnishing 
wild accompaniment to the journey. 

From Ayr to Glasgow the road is practical! \ level ami 
offers a good surface for rapid travel, (hie of the important 
objects of interest is to he encountered twenty-one miles 
out of Glasgow — the Burns Kilmarnock Memorial; and at 
Ayr the tower of William Wallace and the Bums cottage, 
etc.. are popular tourist attractions. 

From the Burns country the traveller then enters the dis- 
trict made famous b) Walter Scott. The scenery rapidly 
grows wilder as the tourist travels northward from Glas- 
gow and enters the district of the lochs. The road winds 
along the shore of Loch Lomond, and an infinite number of 
beautiful outlooks are to he had as the road turns in and 
out along the hanks of the streams and through the rugged 
hill country. Steep ascents are encountered as the tourist 
nears Jn\ erar\ . 

Many Scottish ensiles, some in ruins and some in 
repair, are to he visited on this Stage of the journey, and at 
(than the side trip to the Hebrides may he taken. It was 
from this point that Dr. Johnson and Boswell went on their 
famous excursion to Statu and [ona. On the island of Staffa 
it is said that Keats found the inspiration of one of the most 



The motorist in England will find courtesy everywhere. His 
first important step is to join one of the two English motor 
clubs, which operate for his protection on all the highways 
of the Isles. Day and night a Club patrol covers the main 
coast roads, and assistance to stranded motorists is one of 
the important features of club membership. 

d'he American tourist will find a charming feature of 
English touring the "discovery" of tiny hamlets here and 
there along tin- way, about which he has read much but 
which are off the more commonly travelled routes. 

The trip from London to Bristol enables one to visit old 
St. Mary's Radcliffe and the Muniment Room where 
Thomas Chatterton, "the marvellous hoy." found the in- 
spiration for his quaint and curious poems written under 
the name of "Rowley." 

A background of reading in the realm of English poetry 
offers an introduction to touring in England of inestimable 
value. The letters of Keats and Southey. the poems of Scott 
and Burns and Wordsworth, the travel tales of Ceorge Bor- 
row, whose "Wild Wales" is a veritable guide book to the 
beauties of that little-known district, and the nature litera- 
ture of ( rilbert White, provide the key to a true appreciation 
of the fascinating districts of old England. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 




The British Empire Exhibition, Wembley, Eng. 



BURMA. Main entrance. Bridge house is copy of famous 

Arakan Pagoda at Mandalay. 
FIJI Pavilion built in Colonial Georgian .style with Tropical 

garden , one of wonders of the world. 

CEYLON. The towers flanking 1 ends are modelled upon the 

famous "Temple of the Tooth" at Kandy. 



NEWFOUNDLAND has most valuable Furs, Pelts and 
Fishery exhibit. 

EAST AFRICA. Pavilion it* copy of aclniil Arab Palace. 

BRITISH GUIANA stages a working model of alluvial 
Gold Mining. 







-rrt- 7 " 

"*«« * mtrrr V s r _^ JU f 




II. M. GOVKRNMENT III ILDINO. Contains larpre relief map 

of the world. Model ships operating' 
\\ STRALIA. Industries: National life: * *»i*l Storage Plant: 

Food stuffs actually reproduced. 

M:\\ f.V.W \\1>. Fish,- in blocks of ice. Now Zealand life 

indn-trio. Scenery. Maori MMtONIS. Folk lore. 



PALACE OF 1MU-TRV. Every brunch ..r industry exhibiting. 

Pineal building ever erected for the purpose. 
INDIA. Within it- walla i«re art. crafts, metal work, carpels, 

carving in wood anil iron. 
PALACE OF ENGINEERING. Mosl ambitions and largest con- 
crete structure in the world. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 




"The lean white bear hath seen it in the long, long Arctic night. 
The musk-ox knows the standard that flouts the Northern Light; 
What is the Flag of England? Ye have but my bergs to dare. 
Ye have but my drifts to conquer. Go forth, for it is there!" 

* * * 

The South Wind sighed: "From the Virgins my mid Sea course 

( her a thousand islands lost in an idle main. 

Where the sea egg flames on the coral and the long-backed breakers croon 

Their endless ocean legends to the lazv. locked lagoon. 

"Stayed amid lonely islets, mazed amid outer keys. 

I waked the palms to laughter — 1 tossed the scud in the breeze — 

Xever was isle so little, never was sea si > lone. 

But over the scud and the palm-trees an English flag was flown. 

"My basking sunfish know it. and wheeling albatross, 
Where the lone wave fills with fire beneath the Southern Cross. 
What is the Flag of England? Ye have but my reefs to dare. 
Ye have but my seas to furrow. Go forth, for it is there!" 

# * # 

"Never the Lotos closes, never the wild fowl wake. 

But a soul goes out on the Fast Wind that died fur England's sake — 

Man or woman or suckling, mother or bride or maid — 

Because on the bones of the English, the English Flag i-- stayed. 



"The desert-dust hath dimmed it, the flying wild-ass knows. 
The scared white leopard winds it across the taintless snows. 
What is the Flag of England? Ye have but my sun to dare. 
Ye have but my sands to travel. Go forth, fur it is there!" 

The West Wind called: "In squadrons the thoughtless galleons fly 
That bear the wheat and cattle lest street-bred people die. 
They make my might their porter, they make my house their path. 
Till I loose my neck from their rudder and whelm them all in my 



yn ■ 



wrath. 



"But whether in calm or wrack-wreath, whether by dark or day, 
I heave them whole to the conger or rip their plates away. 
First of the scattered legions, under a shrieking sky. 
Dipping between the rollers, the English Flag goes by. 

"The dead dumb fog hath wrapped it — the frozen dews have kissed 

The naked stars have seen it, a fellow-star in the mist. 

What is the Flag of England? Ye have but my breath to dare, 

Ye have but my waves to conquer. Go forth, for it is there!" 



Tub S, l l >24 



AND CALIFORN] \ \i>\ ERTISER 







Our London Letter 




Dear George ; 




Wembley, England. 

April 30, 1924. 



"HEN I left New York on the trip to England 
that I told you about for the sale of cheaper types 
of cars. I had no idea that I was going- to have 
one of the most wonderful experiences of my life. 
But before I start on that I should like to say that the 
American market for the smaller cars is likely to be much 



are spending about a quarter of a billion dollars on it at 
the same time that they are heavily taxed, more heavily 
than any other country ever has been in modern times, 
with their trade all dislocated owing to the state of Euro- 
pean politics. But the fact is that 'their pride will not let 
them take second place for a moment, and lame though 
they are, they are striving to maintain the position which 
they have won. And, believe me, they look very like 
doing it. 




Ill (KINCIIAM PALACE, OFFICIAL town RESIDENCE Ol 



THE KOY.M. FAMILY OF ENGLAND 

Underwood & Underwood Photo 



extended, owing to the new British Budget, which takes the 
duty off this type of car and allows of their free importa- 
tion. This will make money for America for some time, 
but it had bettei be made quickly, for these English are no 
back numbers, and it will not take them lon^ to get on to 
the game. 

We had the idea that after a war as great as that which 
they had been through, that this country was all in and 
that it had no pep left and was ready to surrender the 
leadership of the world to the old U. S. A. Don't make 
any mistake like that. There is not a bit of give up about 
them. 

Vmi have heard all about their unemployed and all the 
trade that they have lost and that sort of thing, but have 
you heard that they are putting over the greatest show in 
the world, the greatest the world ever saw. and that this 
great show is confined to their own Imperial exhibit? They 



I was so taken with the idea of this exposition and the 
pluck involved in the program that 1 went out to Wembley 
to see it on April 23rd, which happens to be at one and the 
same time the day of St. George, the patron saint, whom 
you may have seen on coins, riding a horse and killing a 
dragon, and the birthday of Shakespeare. 

It was one of those grey days which are the rule here, 
when the air seems to be completely charged with mois- 
ture, so much moisture, indeed, that it is too full of wet 
even to rain. But in spite of the grey, perhaps because of 
it, the sight of the marvellous palaces and buildings was 
satisfying in the extreme. The colors were toned down to 
a uniform tint of splendid rich gentleness, much as the 
brilliant tones of a rich rug merge into a gracious and 
satisfying beauty. 

But it was all so distinctive that one could not help ex- 
claiming: "How British." and among all the foreigners of 







('ATHEI)KAL OF THIS BLESSED VIRGIN, 
AT LINCOLN, ENGLAND, THK PUREST 
TYPE OF EARLY GOTHIC ARCHITECTURE 
IN ALL EUROPE. ERECTED IN 1080, 



Underwood & Underwood Photo 




I'nricrw l & Underwood rimin 



TOIVI'.R r.l; I lx. I : OF LONDON. SELDOM DO 
UK SEE A FABRIC OK STONE SO Fl 1,1, OF 
GRACE AND DIGNITY. IT IS TDK MECCA 
OK A 1,1. AMERICAN TOURISTS. 



24 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 



us, that was the exclamation most in use all day. Some- 
times it was said in a sort of good natured derision, but 
much oftener in admiration and surprised awe at what had 
been done with the materials by a people which has never 
laid claim to first class artistic ability. We had the most 
beautiful exposition in San Francisco that I have ever seen. 
This exposition at Wembley is not more beautiful, it could 
not be; but it ranks very high in beautv and is over- 
whelming in its scope and magnificence. 

How British! As I sat on the topmost rim of the great 
Stadium and looked at the thousands assembled in the grey 
light to welcome their King and Queen, and to voice their 
loyalty to, and pride in their great Empire, no other ex- 
clamation was possible for nowhere else could such a sight 
have been open to human eyes. There was a great oval 
lawn, as green as emerald, with such greenness as no one 
can ever find anywhere else. On one side was a great mass 
of white and scarlet, this was caused by the massed cathe- 
dral choirs and the brass bands, the former in their white 
surplices, the latter in their scarlet and gold. Wherever 
your eye turned you saw white and scarlet and purple and 
gold masses of them all against that lovely green back- 
ground of rich reg-al grass. There were yeomen of the 
guard in scarlet and gold, gentlemen at arms in plumed 
hats and gorgeous liveries, soldiers and police of all colors 
and in all sorts of wondrous attire, Scotch, Welsh, Irish, 
Coldstream and Grenadier Guards in scarlet and gold with 
great busbies, kilted pipers of all the colors of the rain- 
bow, massed hands of gold and scarlet. 

At one time one felt the curious, indescribable thrill 
which only comes when the emotions are deeply stirred. 
Once when the massed bands played "The Voice of the 
Guns" and "On to Victory" and one could see even these 
phlegmatic Britons weeping here and there, for these were 
the tunes with which the departing soldiers were played 
off to the fields of Flanders in the war, and again when the 
massed choirs sang the marvelous words of Blake's great 
poem : "I shall not rest from mental toil, nor shall the 
sword sleep in my hand, till I have built Jerusalem, in 
England's green and pleasant land;" and. then, again when 
the King came and the whole crowd rose cheering with an 
unbelievable intensity, as if they recognized in the small 
and rather unimpressive figure, the personification of all 
their ambitions and all their loyalty. 

These British are impassive folk for the most part, but 
when one is admitted to the inner circle as I was at this 
ceremony, it is different, and there was something almost 
pathetically dignified and simple in the way in which the 
young Prince of Wales, who is the President of the Expo- 
sition organization, handed over the work accomplished 
into the hands of his father, who is the head and representa- 
tive of the Imperial power and dignity which is behind all 
this exposition. 

And then the exposition itself. One can only say what 
Chesterton said that "what is called the British Empire 
should be correctly called the British Adventure." Here 
before one's eyes is the great adventure itself from the 
little home land in the North Sea to the widespread do- 
minions and commonwealths across the water. 

There is the Palace of Engineering', the largest concrete 
building that was ever erected, six times the size of Trafal- 
gar Square, with the massive engineering exhibits of three 
hundred mechanical engineering firms. 

India is represented by a magnificent replica of the Taj 
Mahal and other distinctive buildings, and with colonnades 
of wondrous architectural grace and dignity. Nothing more 
beautiful was ever seen to illustrate the perfection of the 
Hindu culture. 

The Malayan Peninsula, concerning which one very sel- 
dom thinks, even when cataloguing the possessions of this 
Island Power, has a fine domed building with two wonder- 
fully slim, tall towers, of the best arabesque designs, and 



lovely beyond words; a paradise with its lake of gold fish, 
lovely beyond dreams. 

The Union of South Africa, that almost latest of Bri- 
ton's daughters, which came to her through fire and battle, 
is decorously housed in a lovely old Dutch building with 
white walls and a red roof and the stoep which is a neces- 
sary part of every South African house. 

Did you ever think of the Gold Coast? How" seldom did 
the thought that there was such a district cross our minds 
away there in California! Yet here it is with its people, and 
its wonderful house, made after the models of the famous 
castles built by the Dutch and Portuguese and Danes on 
the West Coast of Africa. 

And Canada with its pavilions, covering thousands of 
square yards, showing its industries, with a full paper mak- 
ing plant and panoramic views of the Rockies. We Ameri- 
cans feel very much at home when we see Canada, even at 
Wembley. 

But it would be impossible even to mention the build- 
ings and to recite them. It would spread to the limit of the 
catalogue of ships that we used to see in the translation of 
Homer at the U. C. So I shall have to pass up Newfound- 
land and Burmah and Zanzibar and Nigeria and Ashanti 
and Cyprus and Guiana, and Ceylon. And there is no time 
to tell you about even Australia or New Zealand. 

It is a wonderful exhibit of a wonderful empire and you 
had better come and see it. 

The one thing that surprised me and to which I have 
not yet become accustomed is the curious feeling of unity 
which underlay all this ceremony. There was no flag wor- 
ship, neither was there, as far as I could see, any king 
worship, and there was certainly no conscious display of 
what we would call "patriotic devotion." But there was 
more than that. There was a sort of dee]) understanding 
and confident unity which was new to me and which being 
new. I cannot well explain. 

In order, however, to grasp the thing and see on what it 
might be founded. 1 went into the country and tried to get 
into touch with some of the monuments of national and 
racial history. I fancy that in this historical background, 
extending over so many generations, we may find the rea- 
sons for this most astonishing welding of the peoples of 
this very widespread empire. 

I send you therefore a few pictures of places that I have 
visited, which to my mind are responsible historically for 
some of the confident, mutual understanding that I have 
noted. 

There is Lincoln Cathedral, the purest early Gothic 
building in all Europe, The ground plan of this cathedral 
was laid in 1086 and the church was consecrated in 1092. 
There is nearly a thousand years of history here. 

Here again is Buckingham Palace, town residence of 
the Kings and only a hundred years old. But directly one 
sees it. the Hanoverian kings and Napoleon rise to the 
mind. There are always lots of Americans here on the ofl 
chance of seeing the King or Queen. 

The Parliament Houses again are new. having been built 
between the years 1840 and 1867. and cost about fifteen 
millions of dollars, but their very newness is only a con- 
tinuation of the old, and the traditional connection with 
their historical predecessors is so marked that one feels a 
sense of distinct antiquity in these buildings. 

Even an outlander like myself cannot but view them re- 
spectfully, for out of them has come much of the greatest 
importance to us on the Pacific Coast, and the governing 
bod) which assembles there is still perhaps the most im- 
portant and significant in the world. 1 went to three de- 
bates. I noted the wonderful democracy in the tone of 
the house which listened to the speech of a working-miner 
with as much respect as it did to the arguments of a des- 
cendant of generations of belted earls. 

I send you a picture of the Tower Bridge, because of its 



Im 



I ! '24 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISE 



25 



grace and dignity. Seldom do you see as lovely a bit of 
work. As for the Tower itself, I send no pictures because 
I have been twice to see it. and if 1 began to talk about the 
Tower there would he no end. It is so involved in the his- 
tory of the British Islands, and so completely also involved 
in our own earlier history, that is to say. the part of our his- 
tory which we had in common with that of Great Britain, 
that it is one of the first places that the traveling American 
wants to see. 

1 took a motor trip into Wales and there came across 
the Castle of Conway, of which I give you a picture. This 
is one of the noblest of the old feudal fortresses and repre- 
sents the power of the old nobles. Edward I built it in 
1284 to hold the Welsh down and succeeded practically in 



doing so lor about three hundred years. Now we have 
just had a Welsh prime minister of Great Britain and al- 
most fanaticall) devoted to his country. The same is true 
of the people of South Africa, who were fighting little more 
than twenty years ago. 

That is another puzzle. How does this country hold to- 
gether in such willing loyalty places so distant and di- 
verse? The history of which these pictures are a sample, 
must have something to do with it. But just how does it 
work? After nearly three months over here I confess ] 
give it up. 



Yours sincereh 



Austin. 




A 






OXUErieinTTTrrr 




ROUSES OF PARLIAMENT, IlI'll.T BETWEEN T1IF. YEARS IH40 AMI IKCo. AND COSTING 



0\ F.R FIFTEEN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 

Underwood & Underwood Photo 



A WONDERFUL RECORD 

For seventy-five years the Liverpool and London and 
Globe Insurance Company, Ltd., has been doing business 
in the United Stales, a period during which the customs and 
practices of men have experienced changes more numerous 
and rapid than at any other time in history, involving there- 
by a proportionate amount of risk that increases tre- 
mendously as the years pass. 

At No. 1. Dale street, in Liverpool, England, the home 
office of this Company was established, in the year lS.Vi. 
and in 1848. near the cud of that quiet little lane called 
Wall street. New York, the firm above named opened its 
doors for the purpose of serving the American Public. 

In those days the population of the United States was 
23,000.000 a trifle more than four times the present popula- 
tion of Xew York City; Chicago had onlj 30,000; Cleve- 
land was a town of 15,000, and our own San Francisco a 
"drows) Spanish hamlet of 500 souls." "The use of steam 
was in its infancy, the dynamo was not yet invented, coal 
scarcely known as fuel, and lire insurance was in the 
cradle o\ its development." 

Since then the number of states have grown from twenty- 
nine to forty-eight; the prosperity of the nation has been 



interrupted by four wars; panics have rocked the country; 
lire and flood have devastated life and property; political 
upheavals have been imminent; violent epidemics have ex- 
acted their toll of human life; there have been great failures 
in the nation's crops; industrial battle> have been bitterly 
waged. Catastrophes of this sort are the acid test of the 
quality of insurance. Many insurance companies have gone 
down under such repeated strain, which is not at all re- 
markable. That a company should have survived and pros- 
pered, under these conditions, is the extraordinary fact. The 
Liverpool and London and (.".lobe Insurance Company has 
had a continuous American history of three quarters of a 
century. Through its complete annals, it has stood stanchly 
in defense of those whom it has insured. 

After the lire of 1906, at a meeting of the Insurance Com- 
panies held in Oakland, during a discussion regarding the 
percentage to be paid on policies, the Liverpool and London 
ami Globe were instrumental in persuading other companies 
to pay 1CK) cents on the dollar. This Company paid dollar 
for dollar on its own policies. 

So it has always paid, no matter what the calamity might 
be; no matter what losses it has itself suffered. It stands 
as a living rock between disaster and mankind. 



26 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



1924 



British Investments in the United States 

By R. F. Berkeley 



IT WOULD he difficult to name a better test of the rela- 
tions between two countries than that of mutual capital 
investment in their industries — expressed in holdings 
of mar'cet securities. Sentiment is. admittedly, a potent 
influence, but sentiment is not a cement powerful enough 
to hold together for long the essentially rival interests of 
business, and it weakens yet more quickly when national 
groups are the elements. 

There have been three phases in the movement of capital 
between the United States ami Great Britain. The pre-war. 
with its strong current of British capital to America, cul- 
minating with a total probably not actually far short of five 
billion dollars at one time, never receding, before 1915, to 
less than a trifle short of four billions (approximately the 
figure at which the total stood on the fateful August 4th, 
1914. The war period followed, with the tide 
turned by a counter-current of forced liquida- 
tion. The third and present phase is witness- 
ing an appreciable flow of repurchase of lead- 
ing American securities, by the reputedly im- 
poverished and overstrained mother of free na- 
tii ins, 

British investment in this country dates back 
to the stirring times associated with the long 
reign of that arch juggler with men's hearts. 
Queen Elizabeth; but large figures did not ob- 
tain until the era of railroads. In 1858, some- 
thing approximating four hundred million dol- 
lars invested in construction work was at- 
tributable to the pound sterling. Figures for 
the next forty-two years cannot be regarded as Reginald 
reliable, but the increase was steady, and it 
would not be overstating the case to put British capital in- 
vested in different American industries at well over one and 
three quarter billions of dollars. From that date onwards, 
fairly reliable figures have been procurable, with the excep- 
tion, however, of private capital invested in real estate in 
this country, and not inconsiderable savings bank deposits. 
The method adopted by the eminent economist, Sir Rob- 
ert Giflfen, was to capitalize amounts shown in British in- 
come tax returns under the heading of investments abroad, 
and allocate an average proportion to investments in the 
United States. Income tax returns are not conspicuous fur 
the exhibition of veracity in any country, but the Britisher 
has a wholesome regard for the consequences of attempts 
to trick revenue officials; and the system of computing- in- 
come in the first home of the Pilgrim Fathers assures suffi- 
cient error on both sides to secure a result as nearly ap- 
proaching accuracy as can ever be assumed fur the average 
statistical "exhibit". Understatement is however assured, 
the data arrived at on this basis being composed mainly of 
income derived from government and municipal loans and 
railroads. 

The same method was followed by Sir George I'aish. and 
his figures as of January 1. 1911 (the latest complete -els 
available) are : 

Estimated Value of British Capital Invested In United 
States As of January 1, 1911. 



Mnance, land and investment 157,185,000 



steel . 



(las and water. 
If' in. coal and 

Mines 

Motor traction and manufacturing. 

Oil '.. 

Telegraphs and telephones 

Tramways 



5.685.000 

1 .730.000 

108.105.000 

1.975.000 

17.875,000 

21,735,000 

14.735.000 



46 
.1 
.1 

3.1 
.1 
.5 
.6 
.4 



by 
in- 

be 




Ti ital $3,440,390,000 

Sir George however improved on the Giffen method 
examining the reports of many thousands of companies 
dependently of income lax returns. His figures may 
taken as a good index; the dominant position occupied bv 
investment in railroads is striking, a position 
which held up to the outbreak of the war of 
1914-1918, and holds today. When the figures 
for 1924 -the first since 1914 that will afford 
lair comparison — are available, railroads will 
still lead, but Public Utilities, Oil. and Real 
Estate will cut a far better figure. The Pacific 
Coast, incidentally, will have a good account to 
give of itself; oil and the canned and dried fruit 
industries figuring handsomely. 

Sir George took 11' < of Britain's total in- 
vestments abroad i $1 5.' 160.000.000) as invest- 
ments in the United States, and added around 
a billion and a half for "sundries" (including 
real estate I. bringing the total scheduled above 
to the neighborhood of four billions. Other 
estimates, worked out by "The Economist" 
statisticians, vary little from Sir George's. 
The War induced heavy realization of foreign securities 
on Britain's part. Even during the first year or so, the 
stream of dollars eastwards ran strong, one railroad being 
sold outright for $12,500,000. and the Bank of England sell- 
ing in New York (for British clients) securities to the 
value of around $250,000,000. Valuable data are furnished by 
the 1**1** report of the "American Dollar Securities Commit- 
tee", (a body that included representatives of the London 
Stock Exchange, the Bank of England, anil the Bankers' 
Clearing blouse), formed to acquire securities issued in this 
country. In all. the sums so procured by liquidation of U. S. 
securities amounted (through this channel alone) to $1,- 
381.130.000. 

The British bulldog has a good grip, growling out at in- 
tervals, "What 1 have 1 hold", and he has many hiding- 
places for his bones. Not more, probably, than 62'r of his 
saleable American securities were dragged out, to which 
mav be added a further 15' < or so that were musty with 



1'. IIKKKELV 



and private 



Municipal 


$ 39,480,000 


1.1* 

85. ' 




2,931,135,000 


Banks 


4.6 50.000 


1 


Breweries and distilleries 

Commercial, industrial, etc 


57.525.000 
78,575.000 


1.7 




MT. COOK. MOW ZKAI.AM). 



J«"y 5, 1924 AX I, CALIFt >K\ 

age or otherwise too malodorous to have an) attraction for 

the dollar. But a g 11) haul was made. 

A further saying may be fairly attributed to the tenacious 
canine: 'A\ hat 1 think looks good, I shall have a big try to 
get", and the British investor is getting his teeth into 

America's best stuff again. The following table shows 
British investments before the war in foreign government. 
municipal and railroad securities, and the percentages these 
comprised of total investments: 

Foreign Foreign Foreign Per Cent 

Government Municipal Railway of Total 

Securities Securities Securities Invsts. 

1909 ... 51,861.008 15.770,120 61,962 010 72% 

1910 ... 38,009,131 11,226,214 56,765,313 57% 

1911 ... 32,377,209 6,998,278 62,425,629 62% 

1912 ... 26.011,029 16,933,881 45,192,355 55%, 

1913 ... 54.916,089 23,346.0-11 68.260.368 75% 
Since the war the percentages of new issues are : 

Home Abroad 

1919 79 <■;. 21 % 

1920 : 84.5 15.5 

1921 46 5 53.5 

1922 42.5 57.5 

1923 (five months) 27.7 72.2 

The deterring influences are many, so far as this country 
is concerned; exchange values playing a big part, profits 
taxes in both countries, and the very high British income 
tax (payable on a'l holdings) being additional hindrances. 
But the dividends are larger than the Britisher can obtain 
On other equally well secured investments — and taxes on 
this side are not always paid ! The elaborate tax forms, 
moreover, indulged in here, bother the British mentality, 
and those who talk of the sentimental angle might as well 



I A ADVERTISER , 7 

save their breath, typewriter and printer's ink. and 
But, as surely as the sun m-ver sets on the British Common- 
wealth of Nations, it will be found that it needs but the 

stabilization of stilling for the initiation of a 11 1-tide of 

British investment capital rolling in on these short 

Many there are. "statistical experts" at that, who are 
warning America that she must rely on herself for the 
financing of her rapidly developing industries; that Britain 
will have enough to do, for a generation, to clear off her 
heavy debt to the United States, to finance her own exten- 
sive enterprises within the borders of her Common wealth 
in South and Central America; indeed all over the world. 
The tale is an idle one. Hand in hand with her, America 
will surely be undertaking the heavy task of world recon- 
struction, but she will have enough and to spare, to restore- 
in great measure her temporarily "lost territory" in this, 
the most profitable, field for the intelligent sinking of cap- 
ital. A country that is able to show the enormous budget 
surpluses Britain is showing, to reduce taxation below her 
admitted and proved capacity to pay it, has more "warm 
stockings" than the soothsayers wot of. And the more 
of her money she invests over here, the better for this coun- 
try, for Great Britain, for the whole world. 



— "I've decided on a name for baby," said the young 
mother. "I shall call her Euphrosyne." 

Her husband did not care for the suggestion, but, being 
a tactful fellow, he was far too wise to say so. 

"Splendid !" he said, cheerfully. "The first girl I ever 
loved was called Euphrosyne. and the name will revive 
memories." 

There was a brief silence. Then. "We will call her Eliza- 
beth, after mv mother." said the voting wife, firmlv. 



% 



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NORTH PACIFIC COAST LINE 

Joint Service of 



HOLLAND-AMERICA LINE 

and 

THE ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO. 



■H 



.*•, n 



uA 



,\T/ h 



" The Pioneer Refrigerator Service" 

Fast Freight and Limited Passenger Service with Twinscrew 
Diesel Motorships between: 



San Francisco 

Los Angeles Harbor 

Portland 

Astoria 

Seattle 

Victoria 

Vancouver 


and 


Liverpool 
London 

Rotterdam 

Antwerp 

Hamburg 



All vessels are especially equipped with coolrooms and 
refrigerators for the transportation of fresh fruits, fish 
and other perishable cargoes. 



Head Offices on the Pacific Coast: 
HOLLAND-AMERICA LINE THE ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO. 



KM Market S<„ San Francisco, Calif. 



Rainier ISMy.. Seattle. Wiish. 



m 



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28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



lulv 5, 1924 



Exhibits of Dominions and Colonies 



By N. Bradley Heath 



V T — W" LL the possessions that comprise the vast domain 
/ \\ of Great Britain are represented in the huge Exhi- 

/" j\ bition now being held at Wembley, England, with 
' " their various products and manufactures, making 
a complete whole, which is an epitome of the immense 
United Kingdom. 



familiar with the mineral development of Newfoundland 
will not be surprised when they are told that the minerals 
exhibit is one of the best that has ever been shown at any 
world show. Newfoundland has quite recently added its 
help in the production of "news print paper" and its forest 
products are very large in all other directions. 



South Africa, an empire in itself and a conn- 
South Africa try offering not only the most diversified 
of all raw products, in agriculture and miner- 
als, but also every known climate, owing to its elevation 
above the sea and its nearness to the tropic zone, in some 
sections. 

This vast field for the development of countless Britishers 
of future years has an exhibition room and headquarters 
built in the Old Dutch style, and this building has the stoep 
and Dutch gables to give it the typical South African ap- 
pearance. The Pavilion covers a space of 50.000 square 
feet. To the western side of the building the South African 
Railways has installed a train, composed of a dining car, 
saloon, kitchen and staff car, complete, so that the visitor 
may have a very practical idea of how one travels in South 
Africa and of how much real comfort exists. On the other 
side of the building is a paddock in which may be seen 
ostriches in full plumage. Demonstrations are given at 
regular intervals to illustrate the manner in which the 
plumes are cut from the birds. 

In the Pavilion one may see exhibits of the wonderful 
wools, mohair, ostrich feathers, fruit, wines, dried fruit, 
canned fruits, minerals and manufactured goods. A com- 
plete plant shows diamond washing, diamond cutting 
and polishing is also shown. Rhodesia, Tristan de Cunha, 
Swaziland and Bechuanaland are represented by at- 
tractive exhibits in the Pavilion. The harbor facilities of 
Durban and Cape Town are also demonstrated. 

West Africa has a building of its own and 
West and East Africa is not behind hand in its hous- 

East Africa ing facilities to show what is being done in 

another part of the big African continent. 
West Africa represents Nigeria, the Gold Coast, and Sierra 
Leone. The West African exhibit is most interesting, be- 
cause the directors have taken the pains to bring to London 
artisans who show their great skill in brass working, weav- 
ing, and leather working-. The East African exhibit is a 
sample of the most artistic of the Arab work of Zanzibar. 
The doorway is a piece of the most magnificent carving by 
Arab masters of the art. 



India is a vast empire, and it is practically an im- 
India possibility to give the reader any idea of" the de- 
velopment that has been going on from one end to 
the other of that great country. The exhibits at the British 
Empire Exhibition help to give a sort of bird's eye view of 
the country's development under intelligent rulers. India 
is gradually developing along industrial lines and it is pre- 
dicted that it will not be long before she will stop import- 
ing any of the ordinary necessities in the line of manufac- 
tured goods. Of course, it will be many years before lux- 
uries will be made in India and these will continue to come 
from abroad. And India uses many more luxuries than we 
are apt to credit it with. 

It was the idea of a genius which suggested that India's 
exhibits should be housed in a palace and that palace a 
reproduction of the incomparable Taj Mahal. The India 
exhibit covers three acres and incorporated with the beau- 
ties of the Taj we have as well those of the Jama Masjid 
at Delhi. The Indian Princes have taken spaces and the 
varied products of their states are shown as they have 
never before been exhibited. 

Burma proves an intense pleasure to the art lover 
Burma fur the Pavilion of this country adjoins the Indian 

exhibit and consists of a building entirely designed 
and decorated in carvings by Burmese artists. These carv- 
ings were, for the most part, prepared in Burma and then 
sent over to be assembled and erected at Wembley. The 
entrance has a bridge house, copied from one of the gates 
of the famous Arakan Pagoda, at Mandalay. The principle 
exhibits are rice, oil, timber, ground nuts, and other agri- 
cultural products; rubies, jade, and amber, silk lacquer 
work, and ivory. 



Tt is not generally known that Newfound- 
Newfoundland land is the oldest of the British colonies 

and as such deserves and receives must of 
the attention of the visitors to the British Empire Exhibi- 
tion. The building in which are shown the resources and 
manufactures of Newfoundland is a very handsome one and 
covers an area of 27,000 square feet. Special attention has, 
of course, been given the display of the wonderful pelts and 
furs found in the islands. Here we have the greatest dis- 
play of fox skins the world has ever had a chance to see, 
grouped together under one roof. The silver, black, red 
and white are found in Newfoundland. Then there is the 
skin of the ermine, that of the seal, bear, marten, otter, 
muskrat, lynx, wolf and caribou. Newfoundland today fur- 
nishes the world with the most wonderful leather products, 
and from Newfoundland is supposed to come the very best 
cod liver oil this world has ever known. Those who may be 



The Ceylon Pavilion is in the Kandyan style of 
Ceylon architecture. The towers flanking it on either side 

are modelled after the "Temple of the Tooth" at 
Kandy, and the wonderful panels surrounding the entrance 
porches are copies of characteristic Kandyan decorations. 
The exhibits contain the well known teas of the island, and 
illustrate its production of rubber and the innumerable ar- 
ticles manufactured from it. 

Hong Kong has been very well named "The 
Hong Kong Gateway of the Far East." It is not only 

the gateway, but it is also the money center. 
For many vears it has dictated as to how financial matters 
shall be 'handled and from its bankers the^ Far East has 
received word as to the value of money. Since the estab- 
lishment of the American flag over the Philippine Islands, 
there has been some slight rivalry shown by Manila, but 
this has not been so serious as to challenge the position 
which time has guaranteed to Hong Kong. The Hong 
Kong Pavilion is furnished with an entrance which is of 
the purest Chinese in style of architecture. Hong Kong, 
situated as it is. and occupying the financial position it does. 
quite naturally is the center to which all of the important 
business of South China is consigned. Here are the head- 
quarters of the old British firms whose names are synony- 



1924 



AND CALIF! IRN1 \ \ I >\ KKTISKK 



mous with the coming of the first Caucasian world mer- 
chandiser to the Far East. 

Hong Kong is not only the Gatewaj of the Far East in 
a commercial sense, but it is also a great military head- 
quarters and the British navj is at home in its magnificent 
bay. 



If not a British possession. Palestine can at 
Cyprus and least be called a "mandatory." One misses 
Palestine Egypt, in which the Israelites were in bondage, 

hut finds in its place the land flowing- with 
milk and honey. This pavilion gives a complete representa- 
tion of the life and principal industries of the two terri- 
tories. 



In the West Indies. Great Britain has a seat 
West Indies of power commercially, a station for her ships 

in commerce and a naval rendezvous in case 
of war for her navy. The West Indies is represented at 
Wembley by everything that is picturesquely beautiful in its 
lure and by every product coming from the many islands 
that may be useful to man. The natural products of Tropic 
isles are most plentiful and now that the native, to a certain 
extent, has shown his ability in industrial lines, an exposi- 
tion of what the West Indies is capable of, is very attractive 
indeed. 

About everything that is grown in the tropics or semi- 
tropics may be grown successfully in the West Indies, and 
from these natural products many manufactured articles are 
now finding their way into the outside world and these and 
the raw products are exhibited in the space allotted to the 
West Indies. 



Bermuda is one of the most attractive of all of 
Bermuda the far flung dependencies or dominions of 

Great Britain, and as such occupies a very 
compelling position in the Empire Exhibition. It is to be 
supposed that but very few people in the world, who are so 
situated as to have an average education, do not know 
about Bermuda and why it has always attracted the seeker 
after unalloyed pleasure. Bermuda is one of the many sta- 
tions which dot the oceans and the lands of the earth for 
the use of the world merchandiser of Great Britain. It is 
one of the best known in the comprehensive system for 
commercial world combination, and consequently of su- 
premacy, in the line of sea traffic. This exhibit will be found 
always calling the attention of the crowds and its attrac- 
tions are so enticing that it easily takes its place as being 
one of the most favored spots. 

The British Empire is so very large in its extent 
Guiana that we are apt sometimes to forget some very 

important lands within its dominion. That is the 
case with Guiana and it is only when we contemplate the 
vast number of raw products and the number of manu- 
factured articles emanating either directly or indirectly from 
Guiana that we begin to realize what a wonderful land it 

is that we ha\ e o\ erlooked, 

It is only through the medium of just such an exhibition 
as this that we get a comprehensive idea of the magnitude 
of the varied products and of the great advance being made 
industrially. Guiana is not only prolific in it- agricultural 
products, but u is heavily mineralized and from Guiana the 
manufacturers of Great Britain derive many products which 
are turned by I'.ritish industry into useful articles tor men 
and women. 



The Fiji Islands arc inten-elv picturesque, and their 
Fiji exhibit is one of the features of the Empire Exhibi- 
tion. The Fiji Islands are remembered by every 
school bov or girl and to many of these, now grown up, 
pace devoted to the Fijian is visited with an absorbing 



interest. \ erv nearly all tropical pro, huts are found in the 
Fiji Islands atid lure. too. the Britisher has known how to 
get the best out of the islanders. Here you see the Fijian 
in native dress, and there you see the more civilized in the 
usual costume worn bv everyday Caucasians. The customs 
of the country, ancient and modern, are exhibited and the 
weapons of warfare and of husbandry are shown. 



The geniuses in statecraft having the mapping out 
Malta of the policies of successive administrations for the 

British Empire in its world domination in merchan- 
dizing way, never for an instant forgot that the Empire must 
maintain its way stations in a military and a naval sense. 
Ami this is what has made the British domination so secure 
at all times. Malta is one of these world stations along the 
merchandizing route of the financiers and traders of the big 
empire. 

Malta is a fortress of great strength and it has served for 
time immemorial as such a way station in the expansion of 
British business. The little island is the principle one of 
the Maltese group. For many years its wonderful potatoes 
furnished the London market with the most toothsome 
tuber ever seen there. But it is not for its products that 
Malta is known and held dear in the hearts of the British 
wdierever they may roam. It is held dear because it is one 
of the chain of stations which has made the British Empire 
what it is today, invincible in time of peace and in time 
of war. 



The Malaya Pavilion is a wonderfully picturesque 
Malaya group of buildings with an interior court and the 
architecture of the whole is of the Byzantine. 
There are great towers and one rounded cupola to top the 
rear of the main building. The gateway is the big opening 
between the two flanking towers and all about the building 
have been grouped shrubs and flowers. The transition from 
the Occidental to the Oriental is abruptly made, and the 
impression is a very pleasant one indeed. Malaya, and what 
it means, is shown by the exhibits of the products of all of 
the various countries which may properly be counted as in 
Malaya. And these products are about as numerous as 
may be, for Ma'aya has many climates within its scope and 
many are the elevations. The Malaya Pavilion is an ex- 
hibition in itself, and many hours might be spent for many 
days before the enquiring visitor would be satisfied with 
what he had seen and heard. 

The exhibited products and the information handed the 
visitors gives a very correct idea of Straits Settlements and 
the Federated and the Un-federated Malay States in gen- 
eral, showing every aspect of these great states and terri- 
tories; their physical formation, flora and fauna, the native 
races, the history of the peninsula, administration, trade 
and industry. 



NEW SPEED RECORD 

Word has been received from Southampton. England, 
that the Cunard liner. "Mauretania". which has recently had 
her turbines rebladed, has beaten her former record estab- 
lished in 1911. The smashing of her record was accomplished 
in a -'K-mile course off the Isle of Wight. 

In the test she ran 14 miles with the tide and 14 against it. 
averaging 26.4 knots. According to officials, however, she 
attained the speed of 31 knots during the run with the tide. 
Tin- is asserted to be the highest speed ever attained by a 
mercantile ship. 

The ••Mauretania". with the " I'.erengaria" ami "Aqui- 
tania". forming what is termed "The Big Three", maintain 
a weekly service between Xevv York. Cherbourg. (France), 
and Southampton and make the voyage with the clock-like 
resrularity of a railroad train. 




THE BRIDGE AND CASTLE. 
AT CONWAY, WALES, ONE 
OF THE STRONGEST AND 
NOBLEST OF MEDIEVAL 

FORTRESSES. 



Underwood & Underwood Photo 



lulv 5, 1924 



AND CALIF* >RN1 \ ADVERTISER 



The Australian Commonwealth 



By Reginald Back 



THE Australian Commonwealth is about the size of 
the United States and has now a population of 
about the same as the United States had at the time 
it separated from Great Britain. It is part of the 
British Empire and is perhaps the most intelligent and 
progressive national entity. Indeed, it has earned a repu- 
tation for political enterprise and sagacity out of all propor- 
tion to its political age; for it was only discovered at all a 
little before the Declaration of Independence. 

The Commonwealth comprises six former colonies — New 
South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia, West- 
ern Australia, and Tasmania. These are now known as the 
"( triginal States". After the war Australia was given a 
mandate by the League of Nations to administer all the for- 
mer German colonies in the South Pacific that formerly be- 
longed to Germany except the Samoan group, which went 
to New Zealand; of these the most important are those 
which were formerly known as the Bismarck Archipelago, 
now called New Britain Archipelago, and the former Ger- 
man possessions in New Guinea. 

The form of government somewhat resembles that of the 
United States but is more like that of the Dominion of 



is also an Australian device of great value. The Common- 
wealth owns all its own telegraph and telephone lines and 
over nine-tenths of the railroads, which speaks volumes for 
the intelligence and energy of the group engaged in sub- 
duing a new country. 

There is nothing which the citizen of the Commonwealth 
lacks of civilization and the fruits of modern progress are 
all his — postal facilities, free schools, independent churches; 
they are all his. The British inherent love of freedom is 
manifest in all his institutions, and the accompanying Brit- 
ish virtues of thrift and political sagacity are the very es- 
sence of his national life. Justice is speedy, and unbiased 
and law reigns supreme in a new land which has never suf- 
fered from either laxity or lynch law. Human history shows 
few political groups of its strength and ability. And all this 
has been done by the common people of the Commonwealth 
pushing their way to a goal, which is the development of 
a free people co-operating- to produce conditions of life 
which will result in the best human type. 

No country has ever been as careful in the admission of 
immigrants. Racial collisions have been deliberately 
shunned as part of the national policy and even of the 




Et lJ IMKI.IAMKM 
' \ \j HOl'NBS. 
l__^ mki.hoi km; 



Canada. Legislative authority is vested in a governor 
general, a senate and a house of representatives. The 
ernor-general is apppinted by the crown; the senate con- 
sists of six senators from each of the ( Iriginal States, chosen 
for six years, and the house of representatives is chosen in 
proportion to population. Each of the Original States has 
a local legislature. The Commonwealth is nominally sub- 
ject to the British Empire but is in reality independent. 

It is a land of great opportunity with an incrcdihlv won 
derful future. It perhaps gives greater assurance of indi- 
vidual well being than any other country today. The indi- 
vidual is protected against the undue influence of corpora- 
tions upon political life, lie has the widest possible latitude 
as a man and at the same time shares in all the accrued 
wealth of the community, for the Commonwealth has fol- 
lowed the example of the municipalities in acquiring for 
the people as i whole the ownership and operation of what 
are known as public utilities. 

The Invalid and Old Age Pension Act. passed in 1908. 
grants pensions to persons who are not lcs> than sixty-five 
years old. and have lived in Australia for twenty-five years. 
Invalids who have lived in the country for more than live 
years after supporting themselves respectably for that time, 
are entitled to a pension should they be incapacitated for 
work. Women have the same right to vote as men. 1 he 
Torrens Land System by which the government attends to 
the sale of real estate and is so enabled to guarantee title 



VI STK VI I A. 

Colonial, policy long antecedent to the formation of the 
Commonwealth < >f the racial content at present it need 
only be said that at least 98$ is British in origin. "A 
White Australia" is the very keynote of national life. As 
for the future, while there may be some modification in the 
rigidity >" far practised with respect to immigrants from 
the European mainland, there can be no question that the 
White Australian Policy will never be modified, as far as it 
is humanh possible to predict. \s a recent authority has 
put it. "Not only labor, but practically the whole of Aus- 
tralia is adamant on insisting on the absolute exclusion of 
all colored people. The White Australia Policy remains a 
sacred and unassailable dogma for the vast majority of 
Australians". 

Though primarily a country, having for its chief wealth 
asset raw material's, the products of the mine, the stock 
ranch, the farm and the orchard, later years have shown a 
very considerable development in industrial activity. The 
war which rendered the transportation of industrial goods 
from Britain expensive and dangerous led to a rapid growth 
of Australian home industry and the two years 1922-1923 
showed an increase of eight per cent in local industry, 
which proves that the war set on foot a development which 
now proceeds automatically. With the growth of popula- 
tion there will necessarily be a still more satisfactory 
growth and the hint will 'come when Australia will prac- 
tically be able to supply all her essential needs. 



22 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 



Around the World by Steamer 



THE boundless energy, persistence and foresight of 
Captain Robert Dollar is directly responsible for 
the epochal part San Francisco is now playing- in the 
History of the American Merchant Marine. For 
when Captain Dollar chose San Francisco as the home port 
for his new .'St maritime enterprise, the Dollar Steamship 
Line, he gave this city the opportunity of participating in 
one of the biggest ventures any American shipping company 
has ever engaged in. The Dollar Line is operating the first 
fleet of passenger and freight vessels ever engaged in 
Around the World service on a regular sailing schedule. 

The Dollar Steamship Line came into being after Cap- 
tain Dollar had made an exhaustive survey of world ship- 
ping conditions. He concluded, during the trying period of 
marine reconstruction which 
followed on the heels of war 
inflation, that the time was ripe 
for an American shipping com- 
pany to establish a world ser- 
vice. 

For many years prior to the 
time Captain Dollar made this 
decision, he had been operating- 
freight boats in the trans-Pa- 
cific trade, therefore he was in 
a position to quickly perceive 
the tremendous opportunity at 
hand for the company which 
would act speedily and estab- 
lish the first world route. Ac- 
cordingly he set about to se- 
cure a sufficient number of ves- 
sels of modern and up-to-date 
construction, which would per- 
mit him to maintain a regular 
two week sailing schedule to 
twenty-one world ports. 

This was a large order, one 
which the average shipping 
man would have quailed at at- 
tempting to fulfill. Not so with 
Captain Dollar. After he had 
carefully inspected all the 
available tonnage on the mar- 
ket he decided that the "Presi- 
dent" liners, built during the 
war by the United States Gov- 
ernment, were the vessels best 
suited to his needs. After many 
months of negotiations, he was 
able to buy the entire fleet of 
as the 502's. 

i >n January 5th of this year a 
Pier 42 to watch the "President Harrison" begin her world 
cruise. This vessel inaugurated the round-the-world ser- 
vice of the Dollar Line. On her maiden voyage in this ser- 
vice, the "President Harrison" carried a large party com- 
posed of members of the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, who carried the commercial message of this city 
into the twenty-one ports of call. 

"Production has become so highly standardized in Amer- 
ica," said Captain Dollar, "that before very long supply 
bids fair to exceed demand in countless industries. This is 
a state of affairs far sighted American manufacturers are 
earnestly seeking to avoid. Increased foreign trade is the 
only solution for such a condition. 

"We shippers are simply a means to an end. But we 
must not rest content with what we have alreadv accom- 



By Dorothy Barrett 

plished. Any man, if he calls himself a progressive ship- 
per, must be constantly on the outlook for new trade routes. 
We are all creatures of habit unless we are aroused. Let a 
man or corporation become accustomed to trading with cer- 
tain countries and they will usually be content to make no 
attempt to increase their scope of business. It is the ship 
owners duty to break this habit by bringing the manufac- 
turer and producer both here and abroad to closer contact. 
We must daily strive to serve the traveler, manufacturer 
and producer both at home and abroad, to the best of our 
ability by giving worthwhile service. 

"It was with this thought in mind that I decided, after 
conferring with various authorities on the subject, that 
surely the L'nited States, with all its vast resources, needed 

to come into close commercial 




! ATTAIN KOIiKKT DOLLAR 



'President" liners known 
large crowd assembled at 



contact with all the nations. It 
was at once apparent that this 
could only be brought about by 
a regular line of vessels circling 
the globe on a dependable sail- 
ing schedule. 

"Because it is inevitable that 
much of this intercourse and 
trade will be with countries of 
the Orient. I naturally expect 
the city of San Francisco, from 
its eminently strategic position, 
to foster a generous portion of 
the success that will be ulti- 
mately derived from har- 
monious international trading. 
In fact 1 openly predict that 
within the next decade San 
Francisco will be the largest 
American port, because trade 
via the Pacific is growing at 
such a rate that before main- 
years have passed it will vastly 
exceed the Atlantic." 

Although he is eighty years 
of age. Captain Dollar takes a 
very active part in the manage- 
ment of his multitudinous af- 
fairs. A month ago he re- 
turned from an exhaustive 
world tour of inspection. Dur- 
ing this trip he first visited the 
Far Eastern headquarters of 
his interests in Shanghai and 
then continued on around the 
world, stopping at all the ports where his liners call, mak- 
ing careful surveys as he went. 

Captain Dollar has long been a familiar figure in Pacific- 
Coast lumber and shipping circles and his years of steady 
progress in both these industries have been marked with 
great success. 

He is a man of tireless energy who attributes his activ- 
ity to years of hard work, beginning when he was an immi- 
grant lad from Scotland working in the lumber camps of 
Canada. Later as he prospered and became a timber owner 
he still continued to apply himself diligently to his work. 
He was one of the original lumber operators on the Pacific 
Coast and was first prompted to enter the shipping busi- 
ness by a desire to expand his lumber trade by exporting 
to China. This occurred thirty odd years ago and since 
that time he has steadily built up his shipping interests 
until he was able to establish his new around the world 
venture. 



luK 



1924 



AND C U.IFORN] \ \l>\ ERTISER 



33 



A World-Wide Service 




E. F. Rixon 

]•- DOUBT if the fortunate traveler of today, 
dining- in state in one of the handsome salons of 
a trans-Atlantic liner; occupying a comfortable 
chair on a palatial observation car running swift 
and smooth as a swallow, over the great American contin- 
ent; riding a pert little donkey over the Sahara sands to- 
wards the huge body of the eternal Sphinx; lying back in a 
steamer chair on the deck of a Nile boat, and watching the 
colorful life of the great river slip by like a vision in a 
dream, ever realizes for a moment that the original Thomas 
Cook's enthusiasm for temperance was instrumental in mak- 
ing a trip around the globe a luxurious and much-to-be- 
envied proposition, rather than an occasion fraught with 
worry and inconvenience. 

Would he not exclaim, incredulously: "What on earth 
has temperance to do with the tours of Thos. Cook & Son?" 

Rack in the year 1841, Thomas Cook was much interested 
in the cause of temperance; so much so, that he organized 
the first railroad excursion ever attempted. The incident 
was a temperance convention to be held in the English town 
of Loughborough, and the members of the Temperance So- 
ciety, numbering 570, made the trip from Leicester to 
Loughborough under the personal guidance of Mr. Cook. 

This personally conducted tour was such a success that 
Thomas Cook established an office in Leicester, and in con- 
nection with his business of lecturing on the subject nearest 
his heart, added the new role of excursion organizer. 

From this beginning the business of Thos. Cook & Son 
has grown into an enterprise that now comprises 150 offices 
in all parts of the world, and a permanent staff of 3500 em- 
ployes, with a head office at London. 

Many events of historical importance have been asso- 
ciated with the name of Thos. Cook & Son since its incep- 
tion, notably the opening up of Egypt as a winter resort, 
subsequently bringing work and prosperity to thousands of 
deserving natives ; again, in 1884. when the British Govern- 
ment determined to send an expeditionary force to the relief 
of General Gordon at Khartoum. Thos. Cook & Son. who 
had been appointed by the Khedive to act as passenger 
agents for the river traffic, took over the entire transport 
service, this being the first time in the annals of British 
history that a warlike expedition had ever been entrusted 
to a private firm. 

To execute this commission Cook & Son had to furnish 
27 steamers. 650 sailing vessels, over 13.000 railway trucks, 
800 rowboats and 5000 native workmen, in addition to 
which 28 large steamers were chartered to convey 40.000 
tons of coal from the Tyne to the Nile. 

This is only one of the many achievements that this firm 
has accomplished during the many years of its service to 
the public, for not only has pleasure in traveling been the 
object in view, but at different times in the annals of 
Thos. Look & Son governments all over the world have 
called upon his various establishments to lend their aid in 
furthering projects thai have changed international history. 

From Alaska'- ic) -bores to the coral isles of the West 
Indies, from Australia's eucalyptus-crowned rolling plains 
to the immensit) of Gibraltar's frowning front, from the 
lure of ( hunt nights to the hazy banks of the Thames, to 
every nook and corner of this old globe can one travel in a 
luxury and with a convenience not always found at home; 
and often at rales that the most modest pocketbook can en- 
compass; and all this is possible through the medium of 
Thomas Cook's Travel Service. 



An Active Industrial Firm 




— "So you are going to send your wife north for a rest : 
"Yes, 1 need one badly." 



k N January 3rd, 1910, Mr. W. Leslie Comyn and Mr. 
B. F. Mackall. both of the City of San' Francisco, 
formed a co-partnership with a view of carrying on 
a general shipping and commission business. The 
partnership was known under the trade name of Comvn 
Mackall & Co. ' ' 

This Company specialized on the exportation of lumber, 
principally to the United Kingdom and Australia, although 
shipments were made to South Africa and to the West 
Coast of South America. 

_ The partnership continued until April. 1920. at which 
time, by mutual agreement, said partnership was dissolved, 
Mr. W. Leslie Comyn taking over the business of Comyn, 
Mackall & Co. A new Company, with a Capital of $1,- 
250.000.00 was formed, which is known as W. L. Comyn & 
Co., Inc., with offices at 310 California Street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. The Company also maintains offices at 645 
Henry Building, Seattle, Washington and in the Board of 
Trade Building at Portland. Ore. Mr. Neil Haig is in 
charge of the Seattle office and Mr. J. M. Van Duzer is in 
charge of the Portland office. 

In 1923 the firm of W. L. Comyn & Co., Ltd.. No. 815 
Hastings Street, West, Vancouver, B. C, was incorporated 
under the laws of the Dominion of Canada, and Mr. Stuart 
MacKinnon is in charge of that office. Mr. W. Leslie 
Comyn is President, and Mr. A. Melville Dollar is Vice 
President. 

W. L. Comyn & Co., Inc.. are represented in Melbourne, 
Australia, by Messrs. Rosenfeld, Hillas & Co., Pty., Ltd., in 
Adelaide by Messrs. Rosenfeld & Co., Pty., Ltd., and in 
Sydney by Jas. Love, E.sq. In London, Liverpool. Glasgow 
and Antwerp by Messrs. Singleton, Dunn & Co., and a 
Chartering Department is maintained at 17 Gracechurch 
Street, London, under the name of Comyn. Singleton & 
Dunn. The Company maintains its own representatives in 
Japan and Peru, and has numerous correspondents through- 
out the West Coast of South America — Valparaiso, Anto- 
fagast, [quique, etc.. as well as in Buenos Aires. 

( Iflicers of the Company are: 

W. Leslie Comyn, President; Ralph M. Roberg, Vice- 
President; W. Williamson, Treasurer; R. If. llolmberg. 
Secretary. 

Mr. Comyn is a British subject, having been born in Lon- 
don, and was in the employ of Messrs. C. 1'. Bowring & 
Co., for a number of years, having been sent to San Fran- 
cisco by that Company as their Pacific Coast Representa- 
tive, which position he held until forming the co-partner- 
ship referred to above. 

It is obvious to the most slightly informed of industrial 
matters that the development of the lumber trade is in the 
present condition of coast growth of immense practical 
value, is one of the most important enterprises for the de- 
velopment of local industry, and in the carrying out of 
their purpose \Y. I.. Comyn ami Co., are adding to our 
wealth and aiding in our development. 

In these respects W. L Comyn and Co.. are but carrying 
out the activities which have been so marked in the indus- 
trial and commercial firms which have established them- 
selves in our midst. The British will always be found 
steadily building up the essential industries and adding 
materially and prudentlj to actual wealth. 

As factors tending towards international amity and a 
good understanding, the various offices which they main- 
tain are conspicuous. Any one firm which maintains rela- 
tions with Australia. Britain. South Africa and Canada is. 
apart from all matters of business, an organ of interna- 
tional g.od will, which becomes still more effective by the 
extension of it- - relations to South America and 

Japan. 




THE LARGEST BATTLESHIP IX THE WORLD 
H. M. S. HOOK, FLAG SHU' OK VICE-ADMIRAL SIR FREDERICK FIELD. 44,C>00 TONS DISPLACEMENT; LENGTH 8(il FEET; BEAM 105 
FEET; SPEED, 32 KNOTS; ARMAMENT, EIGHT I5IN., TWELVE OIN., KOI II 4IN. GUNS; COMPLEMENT liSOO OFFICERS AND MEN. 




THE LIGHT CRUISER DELHI. FLAGSHIP OF REAR-ADMIRAL THE BON. SIR 111 BERT BRAND. AND SISTER SHIP TO H. M. 
DCNEDIN. DISPLACEMENT, 4;r.O TONS; LENGTH, 445 FEET; SPEED, 29 KNOTS; ARMAMENT, SIX BIN. AND TWO 8IN. GINS. 




THE LIGHT CRCISER DANAE, SISTER SHIP TO DAUNTLESS AND DRAGON. THESE SHIPS DIFFER ONLY IN MINOR DETAILS FROM 

DELHI AND DCNEDIN. 




THE BATTLE-CRUISER REPULSE. SISTER SHIP TO THE RENOWN: 86,500 IONS DISPLACEMENT; LENGTH 104 FEET; BEAM 108 
FEET; SPEED 82 KNOTS; ARMAMENT SIX 15IN. SEVENTEEN 4IX. AND TWO SIN. GINS. 



lulv 5, 1"24 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Britannia Rules the Waves 



By Eleanore F. Ross 



THE biggest battle ship in the world will be lying 
in the waters of San Francisco Bay on July 8th, 
if nothing happens to prevent, and of course, this 
being- a British ship, it stands to reason that nothing 
will. With the Mood will be the light cruiser Danae, the 
battle cruiser Repulse and the light cruiser Delhi, besides 
smaller cruisers and submarines, making up the quota of 
the Flying Squadron. The importance of this event is in- 
tensified for us in the fact that San Francisco is the only 
American continental city which this Flying Squadron will 
visit. The period of time wherein this part of the British 
fleet will be stationed with us will be devoted to all sorts of 
social functions for the officers and men and entertainment 
committees and hosts and hostesses of private homes and 
hotels will be taxed to the utmost in providing food and 
amusement to Britain's fighting men of the sea. 

There will be over 7000 guests bidden to one banquet 
alone at one of our leading hotels; the Chamber of Com- 
merce, the Downtown Association, the English Speaking 
Union, the Sons and Daughters of St. George and numerous 
other American and British organizations will find them- 
selves "chasing the glowing hours with flying feet" in their 
laudable endeavor to live up to the frequent boast that 
"San Francisco knows how." 

And we must not only "know how" to do it for San Fran- 
cisco but. for the time' being, we must represent the hos- 
pitality of the whole of the great old U. S. A. 

What do we know of the navy of which this particular 
unit is a portion? What do we know technically of our own 
navy not to mention that of our Mother country? What 
could we tell about this naval power which rules the seven 
seas? Whose force is recognized and feared in every nook 
and corner of the civilized and uncivilized world? Whose 
strength has kept inviolate the Mother country herself? 

The British and American Navies 
Exclusive of coastguards, the British navy consists of 
99 S00 officers and men ; the total for the United States navy 
is 116 400. The estimates of the two countries, allowing 
for the rate of exchange, show that the United States is 
spending some eighteen millions sterling more than Great 
Britain on the year's provision for the navy. The present 
capital strength of the British navy consists ol twenty-two 
completed ships and two laid down for building. 1 he I mted 
States fleet contains three such vessels and the Japanese 
fleet two In ships of over thirty thousand tons, (..real 
Britain has one, the United States has ten and Japan has 
Six Including the Dominion navies. Great Britain has fifty 
completed cruisers and light cruisers, while the I mted 
States has twenty completed and four building. Of ancra t- 
carriers, the British total is seven, as against three tor the 
United States. In torpedo destroyers and flotilla leaders, the 
British strength, inclusive of the Dominion navies, is Oil, 
compared with 316 on the part of the United States, and 
the British submarine strength consists of sixty-seven, in- 
cluding the Dominions, against ninety-nine built and twen- 
ty-nine building in the United State. British superiority 
lies in cruisers and light cruisers alone, and in the other 
items of the fleet there is marked inferiority. 
The Scrapping Policy 
Under the new Admiraltj policy based on the Washing- 
ton agreement, practically seventeen splendid capital ships 
must be trapped. This decision was accomplished white 
yet the Washington agreement waited completion b) the 



other Great Powers concerned in its framing. It is worth 
while noting that the British Empire alone took such a risk, 
just as it alone, apparently, intends to pay its war debts. 
This "scrapping" of wonderful pieces of mechanism that 
have taken years to build, are considered "economies" by 
the powers that be, from which economies the over-bur- 
dened taxpayers derive immediate benefit, but to the "man 
of the street" it seems tremendous waste. The bald figures 
of navy estimates tell little of the actual effect on the navy 
itself, but when we realize that the fleet personnel has un- 
dergone reduction by 20,000 men ; dockyard personnel has 
been reduced to the extent of 10,000 men and reserves of 
ammunition, of fuel and of stores have been cut down to the 
very lowest limit compatible with safety, we discover where 
the economies come in. 

As regards expenditure, the construction of a naval base 
at Singapore will cost something over ten million sterling, 
which is the most noteworthy extension of naval interests 
in the policy under which the 1923-24 estimates were 
framed. A million sterling will go towards the provision of 
oil-fuel tanks; extensions in this direction are to be made 
at Glasgow, Malta, Aden, Ceylon, Rangoon and Singapore 
— all on the trade route to the East. 

Quoting from a report of the British navy : "To reduce 
the establishment of the navy to the extreme limit com- 
patible with safety is the policy pursued today; it is justified 
only by the fact — if fact it be — that the whole world is sick 
of war and the threat of war, and that in addition to this, 
no nation can afford armed conflict. Since no other justifi- 
cation for such a policy of retrenchment on this scale can 
be found, it seems that the present policy can not be pur- 
sued indefinitely. Assuming that the Washington agree- 
ment remains effective, so far as the signatories to that 
agreement are concerned, there remain other nations out- 
side the scope of the agreement — ineffective for the present 
beyond question, in the matter of sea power, yet naval poli- 
cies should concern themselves with tomorrow equally with 
today." 

The Eternal Question 

That, it appears to us. is the eternal query : What effect 
will be produced on the nation itself, which, in the develop- 
ment of a humane civilization, offers up its weapons of war 
on the scrap heap? 

Will it not be placing itself at the mercy of the barbarous 
nations — for barbarous nations there will always be; the 
different races of the world never having been, in history, 
educated up to any single standard 3 But these questions are 
irrelevant; we are concerned just now with the visit of 
King George's fleet. 

In the whirl of social gaieties that will mark this history- 
making epoch, the flapper and her squire will doubtless 
measure the English navy, to a certain extent, by the shape 
and size of the human inches enclosed in the British uni- 
form; the carriage of the fighting seaman; his mode of 
speech; his manner and the insignia of rank upon his 
sleeve. But to those who go deeper into the heart of things, 
the significance of the whole proceeding will be visualized; 
these men, to them, will stand for the fighting force of the 
greatest navy in the world; as the strength of a nation upon 
whose possessions the sun never sets; whose Mother Land 
has never been invaded by hostile troops; whose flag floats 
in the wind from Australia's rolling field of bush to the icy- 
shores of Hudson Bay. Long may it wave! 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 



E»:s-K&«K:ffi&«'asS&£SBsS2SffiSgSBS?SB2HS!!BgaSSgE 



Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 




'HE sentiment of youth is a marvelous thing — golden 
virtue, unmined. At human birth all that is fine is 
potentially alive, a working substance for uplifting 
possibilities. The struggle begins, for man is ever 
born a savage and a thief. This is so notwithstanding his 
own particular ancestors have been superior long enough to 
breed him to the ethereal border-line. He is ever falling- 
back by the weight of the vileness and meanness in him. 
Ideals of youth are the richer inheritence of its spirit, buoy- 
ing it upward, but absorbing a full measure of shame as re- 
sult of acts from vicious tendencies. 

\\ hat we see in the face of youth so wonderfully fascinat- 
ing is faith and hope — and one can believe, charity. This 
is its sentiment, that looks on the world as good. It is in 
full flower at the adolescent period — for some mysterious 
reason — after all the little savageries of childhood. The 
boy or girl then stands on the brink of life, and looks out mi 
a preparatory year before it enters therein. If you do in it 
think this is so. watch! The one who sees all before him in 
sky-hued blues of reigning virtues, the youthful possessor 
of eyes that reflect a world where regal goodness dominates, 
is made to play the game of it as an unchangeable idealist. 
He is rare of his kind, the best of what moved the spirit of 
his ancestors are to remain with him through life. He is 
the type who says wonderful things showing hope in his 
kind, but about whom his relatives and the rest shake their 
astonished heads, which they tap with their fingers. The 
other, girl or boy. begins to look wise and to make shrewd 
remarks. He is the usual, but the parents gleefullv rub 
their hands, for they see the offspring who have no foolish 
illusions that will prevent him taking care of himself — or 
herself. * * * 

— Dr. Campbell, at the University, recognizes that edu- 
cation in schools is the foundation of knowledge, and that 
in college the higher branches are taught ; evidently of the 
opinion that trades are to lie learned in the battle of life, 
or institutions for them. So it is with arts as professions. 
College education is a training, which James Russell Lowell 
calls "an excellent thing." He says further that "after all. 
the better part of every man's education is that which lie 
gives himself." 

Speaking of the public schools, he gives the opinion, re- 
garding his own time, that he has sometimes thought that 
they "undertook to teach too much, and that the older sys- 
tem, which taught merely the three R's, and taught them 
well, leaving natural selection to decide who should go 
farther, was the better." 

— We should say that King' George of Greece stepping 
from his throne, in search of employment would carry dig- 
nity, and wish for something suitable to his royal person. 
How he gets it writing for the "movies" as he wishes, is 

beyond comprehension. 

* * * 

— Where is the bean shooter of the boys? At least it is 
not evident in the city, and the birds are safe, but where 
are the trees for the birds to fly among and cavort with 
gaiety? Are the boys less cruel, or is it that their parents 
are, and make them so? Well, it comes to the same thing. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 



Telephone Sutter 6130 



Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



— Once again: "Lad at play shot by his companion." 
One boy, 15. Henry Cory, of Alvarado, may lose his life, 
because Manuel Decoto, also 15. was examining a gun 
with him. Cory was shot in the abdomen. Of course if 
the adults have not found a way of keeping dangerous arms 
from the hands of boys, grief lies at their doors. 

— The only trouble about anger is that it doesn't last. 
It is like lightning, whoever avoids being hit when it strikes, 
is safe. Just anger is a moving thing of great force, and 
since we can't keep it up without it bursting us. it is too 
bad we are unable to harness it until the proper time. If 
we could recall all the anger scurrilous statesmen were re- 
sponsible for. we could with a turn of the crank blast them 
from the face of the earth. 

— What seems to be the matter with many of these new 
religions is they don't realize what a miracle is. Even in 
the old days they knew what was what in that regard. To 
relate a tale: Two rabbis were drinking wine together, and 
one drank too much, wherefore they got into a fight, and 
the one almost killed the other. When it was all over the 
offending doctor said that it was only a miracle he became 
so drunk, he never had belore. but that he would come to 
visit his confrere again and they would still be friends; 
but the other said, no. he had been saved by a miracle, and 
miracles did not happen everv day. 

* * *" 

— < if course we don't know who is reading this particular 
article, but whoever you are, if you are so inclined to be, 
or il anybody has told you anything to make you think 
you are. our advice is. do not go on thinking yourself a 
genius. And to the parents whose children say "Coo goo" 
in a particular way, and who therefor think they have in 
their arms a Napoleon, get over the idea! Don't encourage 
it in the youngster. It is better the child learns simply and 
naturally the price of shoes or mowing machines, then to 
sell them in a humdrum way, thereby, bringing home the 
bacon. 

— Atheists are often, to say the least, exasperatingly im- 
pudent, as well as blasphemous. Because they would not 
be religious themselves, they must assume an insulting 
antagonism toward all who have faith. With cheap, loose- 
ness of vile tongues they spi t out words of venom with 
vicious intent of offending, others of nobler minds. They 
chase around to obscure printers to have their material 
printed, which is unhealthy more on account of the lan- 
guage and tone than the text. 

* * * 

— The trouble with the Xobel Prize is that the bene- 
ficiaries of it have no need of the recognition. When 'tis 
given they already have the stamp of world public approval. 
A thing more foolish was the Carnegie hero medal, imagine 
a hero being tempted to heroism by a rich man's medal! 

— Where was it that the girl was sent home from school 
having gone there bare-legged on a wager? We'll bet she 
would not have tried it a second time if she were not al- 
lowed back until she came knowing Homer in Creek by 
heart. 

— As Blacks tone says, it is not the punishment of a crim- 
inal for its own sake that prevents a recurrence of crime, 
but the certainty of punishment. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

B50 Bush Street, Itetween Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



lulv 5, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



37 



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s :: 

Paramount Paragraphs 

k a k k :: :: r, k g III K k « k .tf k k : « k k k !( n j[ iinUy. SSS SSSS SSS « w H k :e m 



— You can lead a woman to the altar. 
ways keep her hitched. 



hut you can't al- 



— One thing; which may he keeping women from the pre- 
sidential chair is their objection to telling their age. 

— Someone suggests that to make an Englishman happy 
in his old age is to tell him a good joke when he is young. 

* * * 

— That hear of a country, Russia, is planning to change 
the calendar. Possibly the next move will he to blow out 
the Northern Lights. 

— Interesting to note that a cable message sent by King 
George at the opening of the British Empire Exhibition 
circled the globe in 1 minute and 20 seconds. 

— Let's quit finding fault with the world, and start in 
praising it. That might bring about, psychologically, a 
great change. 

* * * 

— All the great Americans have not yet been canonized, 
nor have they had birthdays commemorated in their honor. 
We call to mind Sitting Bull, Geronimo and Tecumseh, all 
Americans of the first water, the latter having been great 
enough to inspire the middle name for one of our most 

famous generals. 

* * # 

— "Critics are very like mosquitoes, they will have your 
blood," says Mr. Galsworthy. "I know a lady who, after an 
operation, came to with the words: 'I don't want to be a 
self-supporting, independent, economic agent; 1 want to lie 
loved.' The literateur comes to under the knives of the 
critics with the words: 'I don't want to lie a double-bar- 
relled, copper-plated literary artist; I want to be read.' " 

* * * 

— Many great schemes are hatching in the busy brains 
of the Middle West, but there is none to compare with the 
proposed improvement of the St. Lawrence River, between 
Montreal and Lake Ontario, to enable ocean-going ships to 
serve the American and Canadian harbors in the region of 
the Great Lakes, and to carry cargoes to and from this 
region without breaking bulks, in the opinion of Lieut. Col. 
Repington, of the British army. 



— Swis- watchmakers can splh a hair into 500 stri] 
measure the thickness, so exact are their tools. Mu i b 
aw t nl bores. 

* * * 

—Mr. Rudyard Kipling has little patience with obstacles. 
To him they exist only to he overcome, and to conquer them 
is among the pleasures of life. As a young man he 

made confession of limitations or gave a moment's thought 
to failure. That is why what he says and what he has 
written, has taken hold upon the mind of youth. The op- 
timist is always more readable than the' pessimist, and 
more admired. Ami to sum it all up, optimism keeps one 
young. 

* * * 

_ — Professor George Barron has returned to his old avoca- 
tion of curator of the Museum at the Park, and immediately 
we note improvements in that splendid gift of Mr. de 
Young's. Quite an addition has been recently made to the 
display of guns and other weapons of war. and a very in- 
teresting collection of shawls of different countries has been 
added. Shawls are almost as expressive of the fair sex of a 
nation as are fans, and this collection is especially note- 
worthy. 

* * * 

— Mr. J. L. Garvin. English lecturer, says: "When we 
compare the relative conditions of the people in the times 
of the two great Exhibitions of 1SS1 and 1924— the differ- 
ence seems like the whole change from deep night to broad 
day . . . Yet we know too well that with all the multiplica- 
tion of the means we have employed for human improve- 
ment, we are very far from having come within sight of a 
sure attainment of our real ends. The very progress as 
hitherto followed, with more regard to material triumph 
than to spiritual enlightenment, has evolved a terrible para- 
dox in this respect, that the destructive powers of science 
threaten to outstrip all our agencies for good." 

* # # 

— The Bishop of Lxeter, England, gives a much-needed 
slam at the "terrible stock sermon" as he calls it. He re- 
marks that everything said by the orthodox minister is so 
perfectly safe; it has been said thousands of times before — 
the preacher is preaching-, not because he has anything to 
say, but because he must preach. As a consequence the 
girls of his congregation giggle among themselves, the boys 
pla\ games, the farmer considers how- he will sell his stock 
at the market, the squire thinks of his next shooting- party, 
while the minister is glued to a manuscript which means 
nothing to him and less to his audience. When heads of 
the Chinch begin to realize these deficiencies in their tem- 
ples, and will begin to try and remedy the conditions, there 
is hope ahead for future well-filled houses of God. 



daft iHarquari 

Adjoining Columbia and Curran Theaters 
Geary and Mason, Phone Prospect 6] 




Brilliant 

Revue 

1 lirected 

to 

Jack 

Holland 



Pretty Girls 

Clen. >er Entertainment 

Excellent Cuisine 

Special Dinners - After Theater Suppers 




A PYRENB Fire Extinguisher should 
be in every home because two out of 
every three tires start in the home 
where the tire hazards are numerous. 
No amount of insurance money can 
replace valued articles in a home 
once lost. Fire in the home has 
added terror because women and chil- 
dren are often alone. 

Be safe with PYRENE. 

Pyrexe Mfg. Co. 

Sutter 115 977 Mission St. 



£ tt*bl,*h»d. 19it 



Kelvinator 

Electric Refrigeration 

FOR THE HOME 




Arrange for a Kelvinator equipment for your 
y with ice and the muss, 
makes ice cubes for your table, freeze 
puddings and salads. 

WATKRimi -J -« u.rox CO. 

523 Market St.. S. F. Tel. Sutter 1938 



38 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Tuly 5, 1924 




This number coming' out, as it 
The Empire Exposition does, on the day following the 
Glorious Fourth, is devoted to the 
explanation on and description of the great Empire Exposi- 
tion at Wembley, England. There is a curious appropriate- 
ness about this. The Empire Exposition is indicative of 
the progress made by the British nation and Empire since 
we withdrew from the association. Our own celebration of 
the Fourth shows, or rather calls our attention to, the prog- 
ress made by our section of the English-speaking world 
since we set up in business on our own account. Taking it 
all together, it is a most staggering- and complete display 
of power and progress. Never has any other people even 
approximated the achievements of this one race. Not only 
in power and strength, in economic security and in material 
advance has this race proceeded from victory to victory, but 
it has. at the same time, developed liberty and raised the 
weak to strength and dignity. 

Whether it be in India or the Philippines the same tend- 
ency is visible; the same anxiety to educate and to improve 
marks the race both in its British and its American forms. 
True enough, its methods may occasionally be subject to 
criticism ; true enough, there is at times an assumption of 
superiority, which is all the more galling because it is un- 
conscious, but the unfaltering zeal with which the general 
purpose is pursued is. in itself, a vindication of the aims of 
the English-speaking rulers, American and British. And 
truly, the Exposition is remarkable. Never in the chron- 
icles of mankind have such heterogeneous and diverse col- 
ors gone to the weaving of an imperial carpet. Yet from 
their very incongruity and apparent lack of harmony, there 
emerges a great congruity and a glorious harmony. So the 
intertwining of the American and British flags to welcome 
the coming of the British fleet marks the association of the 
two great English-speaking branches in their great work of 
compelling nature and redeeming mankind. 



There is no national holiday com- 
Our National Holiday parable with our own. It is true that 

our good northern neighbor. Canada, 
has instituted a national commemoration of her national 
unity — Dominion Day. on July 1. But there is, and there 
necessarily must lie. a world of difference between the cele- 
bration of an act of political unity and the annual recogni- 
tion of the fact that on one particular day the people of this 

country actually declared that they st 1 on their own feet 

and that henceforth they were responsible to themselves 
alone. So, our holiday also differs in its essence from the 
great French holiday. Bastille Day, which also occurs this 
month, for that celebrates a deliverance; ours celebrates a 
birth. 

Each year has seen us moving along the road of our des- 
tiny stronger and more confident in ourselves. There have 
been times when the outlook was very obscure, when we 
had to cheer ourselves, and the Flag which had been so 
nobly raised seemed, by no means, as secure as we had 
hoped. But those times have passed. Today we stand where 
no foe, foreign or domestic, if we have any. can, by any 
possibility, assail us. We are. today, the richest and the 
most secure country in the world. War may threaten much 
of the modern world, but it does not even frown at us. 
Civil discord may lie rife elsewhere, but here there seems 
no prospect of any other than a direct and straightforward 
advance to better things and to more humane conditions. 



It is true that there is much to be done; it is also true that 
we have the brains and the strength and the will to do it. 
Our enormous resources are as yet hardly touched, and can 
lie indefinitely increased by the application of modern 
science in which none are more skilled or ready than we. 
So that we can say truthfully, with pardonable pride: "Fair 
is our lot and goodly is our heritage." Our fathers founded 
us; we have builded on their foundations; our children ap- 
pear to be eager to carry on the work and to make this a 
kind and merciful, as it is a powerful, land. 



Our readers may remember that a 
The Hospitals Again while ago we took up the question of 
the hospital charges, and of the du- 
ties of hospitals to the public. Our remarks were received 
with some acerbity and with considerable lack of under- 
standing. Then we noted that Henry Ford had established 
a hospital in which he had a fixed rate of charges and made 
it a sine qua non that all patients should have the same care 
and that no advantage was to be taken of the fact that one 
patient was richer than another. This fairly sensible plan 
was received with much adverse criticism. Now we note 
that the agitation which may be said to have started with 
us. is receiving some notice in the East and the matter is 
being discussed with considerable vigor by editors and cor- 
respondents. Out of the mass of communications to various 
papers, we select the following as being to the point: 

"I am no publicity agent for Mr. Ford, but it seems to 
me the working people who are so unlucky as to fall sick 
should have a word. Anyone who has been stung by mod- 
ern hospitals and doctors must greet the Ford plan with a 
shout of joy. His idea is simply to protect the sick and in- 
jured employees from being exploited by doctors, nurses 
and hospitals. The modern cost of sickness is appalling and 
unnecessary. If you can find an honest doctor he may pos- 
sibly admit that none but the very rich and the very poor 
can afford to be sick and have adequate care. The rich can 
meet their bills, the very poor are charity patients, but 
what about the rest of us? I know case after case of those 
of moderate incomes who must go shabby and pinched after 
serious illness because of the exorbitant medical charges. 
They are decent people who pay their debts, but thev cer- 
tainly know the medical profession has them 'on the hip. 1 
If there is any plan — even a Ford plan — to lessen the mid- 
dle-class terror of illness and its consequent exploitation I 
believe there are millions of people who will cry 'Bring it 
on.' " 

The only objection we have to this is the use of the term 
"working people." If by that is meant hand-workers, they 
are perhaps just now in a better position to pay than mem- 
bers of the so-called middle classes. 



Time gathers, one by one, the leaders of the 
Adolph B. generation which has completed its work in 
Spreckels human history. As far as they are concerned, 

time and space ceases to exist. They become 
one with the Infinite. We who are faced with the same 
termination of all conscious effort, at least on earth, view 
their departure and estimate their worth in terms of the 
social group, or the national group or even of mankind in 
general, in proportion the extent of the influence of the 
deceased. 

But universal as death is and incapable as it must be. it 
still has the power to inflict a shock upon the rest of us 
who are left. Even those who are not intimately related to 
a man of notable achievement are grieved and perplexed at 
his passing. Thus, the death of Adolph B. Spreckels shocks 
our community and is a sorrowful episode in the social 
life of the last week. For, he was a man of unusual parts; 
a man of great industry and great ability; moreover he was 



Juvl 5, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 






a man of great generosity and marked philanthropy. In 
these respects he is eminently typical of a species which 
this country lias produced in striking numbers. It is a type 
strong and vigorous in itself, made for victorious struggle in 
the tierce competition of today, yet gentle and sweet and 
full (if consideration for those who are less suited for the 
grim game of success. 

Adolph B. Spreckels was horn in San Francisco sixty- 
seven years ago and for the last twenty-eight years has 
been a park commissioner of his native city. His financial 
resources, which were great, have been placed at the dis- 
posal of the state. He was greatly interested in the agri- 
cultural and animal husbandry of the state and has done 
much to improve the breed of horses and cattle. His city 
activities were at least as important as his rural, and his 
building enterprises in San Diego and San Francisco have 
added much to architectural values in each of those com- 
munities. 

Other forms of state development are associated with his 
ownership of the Oceanic Steamship Company, which made 
him an important factor in Pacific commerce and largely 
contributed to the development of the wealth of the state. 

More and more, of later years he has taken an interest in 
philanthropies of a social nature and he has enriched Golden 
Gate Park with monuments. The most conspicuous of his 
gifts is the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in 
Lincoln Park. This is a gift to San Francisco to commem- 
orate those who gave their lives for the country in the 
World War. No city in the world will have as noble and 
dignified a memorial' as this when it is complete, and the 
wishes of the donor are carried out as they will be under the 
artistic and zealous superintendence of his widow. This 
Palace will contain a most wonderful collection of objects 
of artistic value and importance which have been collected 
over a long period of years and which are to be the property 
of this city. Occupying a glorious site and magnificent in 
its design this building will remain a monument to the 
splendid soul of the man who raised it. 

The Mayor in his usual fine manner summed up the loss 
to this community in a commendable statement the conclud- 
ing paragraph of which we quote as the most adequate sum- 
mary : ,11 

"The passing of such a man, brings sorrow to the whole 
west. I mourn for the going of a most admirable public 
official and for a very dear personal friend." 

Wedding Presents— The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



VACATION TIME 

is 

FLASHLIGHT TIME 

Renew your batteries and bulbs before going away 

HETTY BROS. 

Headquarters For 
FLASHLIGHTS— BATTERIES— BULBS 

Free Flashlight Battery with every $3.00 sale or over 
during months of June and July. 



T US TIN RADIO 

RADIO SALES — Receiving and Transmuting Specialist 

SUPPLIES Special Radio apparatus built to order 

Service— Repairing— Inspection. We specialize in instal- 
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Insures a continuous entertainment. 

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Oui New Location — 198 Suite.- Street San Francisco 



■ ■■■■■■- 1 <g£3 



(JaliforniOCiibtrtiBft. 



STRAITS 



EDIT 



PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED 



July nth, 1924 



m 



'■Partial Contents 



WHY MARE ISLAND SHOULD REMAIN 
THE NAVAL BASE 

A SHIP CANAL TO SACRAMENTO 

WATER SUPPLY AND FIRE PROTEC- 
TION OF VALLEJO 

COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL AD- 
VANTAGES OF VALLEJO 

AERO VIEWS OF MARE ISLAND 
NAVY YARD 

VALLEJO'S CENTRAL INDUSTRIAL 
SECTION 

PANORAMIC VIEWS OF VALLEJO AND 
MARE ISLAND 

PROMINENT BUILDINGS 

ARTISTIC HOMES 

NEW SCHOOLS AND BANKS 

BENICIA AND ITS DEEP WATER 
HARBOR 

THRIVING CITY OF MARTINEZ 

And all the regular features. 



V,:< 




40 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 




BUSY CUPID 

MISS HELEN RODOLPH., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George W. 
Rodolph of Oakland, became the bride of Lawrence Coffin 
Ames on Saturday evening, the Rev. Alexander Allen, rector 
of St. Paul's, officiating. Later there was a reception and 
wedding supper at the Rodolph home. The bride was given 
away by her father. Mrs. Louis Ghirardelli, a sister of the 
bride, was her matron of honor. Miss Helen Ames, a sister 
of the bridegroom, was maid of honor, and Mrs. Carleton 
Brvan and Miss Carolyn Rodolph were bridesmaids. Burton 
Ames was his brother's best man. and the ushers included 
Werner Schurr. Harold Havre. Louis Ghirardelli and Schur- 
mann Asche. The young couple will make their home at Los 
Angeles. 

MISS CATHERINE PITTMAN, daughter of Mrs. S. Kemp Pitt- 
man, became the bride of Henry Forbes Stanton, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Lee Stanton of Detroit, at St. John's Epis- 
copal Church in Ross on Saturday evening. The Rev. H. H. 
Powell officiated and following the church service there was 
a reception and wedding supper at the Pittman home in 
Ross. H. W. Dakin gave his niece in marriage. Miss Mar- 
jorie Pittman. a sister and Mrs. Ralph Palmer, a cousin, at- 
tended the bride and Ernest Stanton was his brother's best 
man The remainder of the bridal party included Miss 
Helen Dakin and Miss Margaret Deems, the latter the small 
daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. Charles Deems, who was 
flower girl. The ushers were Messrs. Geoffrey Armsby, 
Richard Dakin, Kemp Pittman, Jr.. and John Dakin, all rela- 
tives of the bride. The newlyweds will make their home in 
Detroit, where the Stanton family is well known and promi- 
nent in society and finance. 

MRS JAMES TARLETON TURNER announced the engagement 
of her daughter, Miss Ruth Turner, to Robert B. Hunt on 
Saturday evening at a dinner party at the Turner home on 
Vallejo street. 

MISS MARIAN HALL MOORE and Dr. Clyde Benton Hudson will 
be married on the evening of July 16, at "Overmarsh," in 
Marin county, the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Keever, 
cousins of the bride-elect where several years ago the great 
grandparents of Miss Moore, Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Pratt, cele- 
brated their seventieth wedding anniversary, the place hav- 
ing been noted for its family gatherings from time to time. 
Miss Moore is a daughter of Mrs. Arthur de Celles dit Duclos 
and the granddaughter of Mrs. Sarah Pratt Carr, who is a 
well-known author. 

MISS MARGARET WEBSTER has chose-n Wednesday, July 23. as 
the date for her marriage to Mr. William Norris King. The 
wedding will take place at four o'clock in the afternoon at 
the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick 
Webster, in Jackson street. There will be no bridal attend- 
ants and the ceremony will be witnessed only by the im- 
mediate relatives and a few close friends. 
LUNCHEONS 

THE MENLO COUNTRY CLUB was unusually gay Thursday, 
when a group of the members gathered for luncheon and 
later enjoyed golf or tennis. Some of those present were 
Mrs. Marshall Madison, Mrs. Ralston Page, Mrs. Frank 
Hooper, Mrs. John Boyden, Mrs. Edward E. Eyre. Mrs. Al- 
fred Oyster, Mrs. John D. Short. Mrs. Louis Jeffrys, Mrs. 
Arthur Hooper, Miss Helen Lee, Miss Cecile Brooke, Miss 
Elizabeth Oyster, Miss Edna Taylor and Miss Adrianne Sharp. 

MRS. FRANK AMES entertained at a luncheon last Friday at 
her home in San Mateo, when her guests included a group of 
the peninsula society set. Those at the luncheon included 
Airs. Kenneth Monteagle, Mrs. Thomas Breeze, Mrs. George 
Howard. Mrs. Austin Moore, Mrs. Fentress Hill, Mrs. George 
Lyman, Mrs. Elysee Hopkins, Mrs. William Devereaux and 
Mrs. Ralph Merrill. 

MRS. RUSSELL WILSON, the former Ellita Adams was at lun- 
cheon in the Hotel St. Francis Monday with Mr. Wilson. 
She was being greeted by her many friends. Miss Geraldine 
King and Miss Julia Adams were with Miss Sharp. 

Mrs. L. A. SCHWABACHEIl and Mrs. Carl Raiss, her daughter, 
were at luncheon together. Mrs. Leopold Michela enter- 
tained a small group. 

MISS ELEANOR MORGAN, .Mrs. Arthur Rose Vincent and Mrs. 
Richard McC'reery were together and another modishly 
gowned group included Mrs. Robert Hays Smith, Mrs. Ross 
Ambler Curran, Mrs. James Jackman and Mrs. William 
Mayo Newhall, Jr. 



BRIDGE 

MRS. WILLIAM GRANT, who has recently returned from hsr 
honeymoon, was entertained at a bridge tea by Mrs. Evan 
Evans, Jr., Monday afternoon at her home in San Rafael. 
TEAS 

THE MISSES RIBIA and Robona King entertained at a tea on 
Saturday afternoon in honor of Miss Eleanor Rossi, whose 
betrothal to Henry Morris has been the incentive for a 
round of parties. The party took place at the Hotel 
St. Francis. 

MISS ANNE PENTZ and the Misses Deborah and Edith Pentz 
have sent out cards for a tea at San Rafael on the afternoon 
of July S. 

DINNERS 

MR. JOHN HOOKER was a dinner host last Thursday at his 
home in San Mateo, when he entertained a party of the de- 
butante set. Afterwards the group motored to this city for 
the performance at the Orpheum Theater. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jerd Sullivan were the chaperons. 

MR. AND MRS. FREDERICK McNEAR entertained a number of 
friends Sunday at dinner. After the repast there was danc- 
ing, or bridge for those who preferred the latter amuse- 
ment. 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM ROTH entertained informally at the 
Menlo Club last Saturday night and they had among their 
guests some of those who attended the children's circus in 
the afternoon. 

DAXCES 

BRITISH FLEET RECEPTION — Society women who did so much 
to further the welfare of the enlisted men of the Army, Navy 
and Marine Corps during the World War have been called 
together again for a similar service in connection with the 
visit here July 8, 9 and 10 of His Britannic Majesty's Special 
Service Squadron. At the request of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, which is formulating the city's plans 
of reception and hospitality for the visiting British sailors, 
these women have accepted the responsibilities of the invita- 
tions and hostess committee. Mrs. W. B. Hamilton is chair- 
man of the joint committee with Mrs. Mabel T. Johnson of 
the hospitality bureau of the Chamber of Commerce, vice- 
chairman. Mrs. Hamilton made an enviable record for her- 
self in the operation of canteens during the war. The func- 
tion of this committee will be to take care of the enlisted 
men at the dance to be given in the Exposition Auditorium 
Wednesday night, July 9. For this occasion the hostess 
committee will require approximately 500 young women as 
dance partners of the navy men. These are to be secured 
through the National League for Women's Service, Y. W. 
C. A. and the welfare departments of the City of Paris, 
White House. Emporium. Livingston's, I. Magnin, Pacific 
Telephone and Telegraph, Pacific Gas and Electric, Standard 
Oil and the United States Veterans' Bureau. All young women 
selected to attend the dance will be given tags of identifica- 
tion and only those having such identification will be ad- 
mitted to the Auditorium. 

MRS. ARTHUR CHESEBRODGH arrived the first of the week 
from her home in Santa Barbara and will spend the rest of 
the summer here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William 
Mayo Newhall. 

MISS CAROLINE MINER, who came to San Francisco to attend 
the Stoney-Manpin wedding, last Saturday, has returned to 
her home in Stockton. 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK AMES, Miss Gloria and Mr. Egbert 
Ames will leave their San Mateo home July 5 and will motor 
to Canada. During the absence of their parents, the younger 
children. Misses Dorothy and Lorraine Ames, will enjoy a 
visit at the Hotel Del Monte. 

MK. AND MRS. HORACE HOWARD and Miss Jean Howard have 
moved to Menlo Park, where they have taken a house for 
the summer. 

MRS. BENJAMIN S. HAYNE has returned to her home in Fill- 
more street after having enjoyed a week's visit with friends 
in Pacific Grove. 

MRS. JAMES I'. LANGHORNE. Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Howard and 
Mr. James P. Langhorne, Jr., left Monday evening on a 
motor trip through the southern part of the state. They 
will first visit in Santa Barbara, where they will make the 
most extensive sojourn, but the party expects to go to the 
extreme south before their return to San Francisco. 

MRS. ROBERT N. CRAVES has returned from San Jose, where 
she visited for several weeks with Mr. and Mrs. Seymour 
Waterhouse. Mrs. Graves will pass the week-end in San 
Mateo as the guest of Miss Lydia Hopkins. 

MISS FLORENCE LOOM1S lias returned from Vassar. joining 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. Loomis in Burlingame. 
She will return to complete her studies in the fall. Francis, 
Jr., is at Coronado, having joined the aviation reserves for 
the summer. 



Juyl 5, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



41 



MR. 



PR. 



MISSES CECILY AND MARIANA CASSERLY, who have been 
Bast, have returned and are at Ihe family home in San 
Mateo. Mrs. Casserly, who has been abroad part of the time 
Since leaving here, is also expected shortly. 

MRS. WILLIAM D. KEYSTON has gone to Coronado to join her 
daughter. Mrs. Otto Qrau, who. with her family, is at the 
seaside resort for the midsummer. 

AND MRS. CHARLES W. CLARK and the Misses Agnes and 
Virginia Clark, who have been away from here for a year 
or more, have returned and for the present are at their villa 
at Pebble Reach. They will come to their home in San 
Mateo this week. 

AXD MRS. HERBERT MOFFITT have opened their place 
at Lake Tahoe for the season, and with their daughter, 
Miss Alice Moffitt, will be there for the next two months. 
They have been occupying the Armsby house in Burlingame 
for two months. 

MRS. HENRY WASHINGTON DODGE and Miss Pauline Wheeler 
left Sunday for Tahoe, where they are the guests of Mrs. 
Margaret Stoney Pryor, who is spending the summer at the 
lake. 

THE MISSES ELIZABETH and Frances Kellam of New York and 
their brother, Mr. Gareth Kellam, who is a student at the 
University of California, have taken a cottage at Carmel 
for the summer. 

MRS. THOMAS DRISCOLL left last week for Santa Barbara, 
where she will be for the remainder of the summer with 
Mrs. Albert Bacon. Mr. Driscoll will join her in the south 
later, but for the present he has taken apartments at the 
Burlingame Country Club. 

MRS. CURTIS HAYDEN, Miss Mary and Masters Brace and Cur- 
tiss Hayden, Jr., left last Thursday for La Jolla, where 
they will be throughout August. 

KENNETH R. KINGSBURY, President of the Standard Oil 
Company of California with Mrs. Kingsbury were the first 
guests to sign the register at Feather River Inn. 
AND MRS. JOHN J. MITCHELL, Jr., of Chicago. 111., to- 
gether with a party of friends motored to the Inn celebrat- 
ing their third anniversary. Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell (who was 
Miss Loleto Ainout) spent their honeymoon at Feather River 
Inn three years ago and returned with friends to enjoy 
a few days in golfing, fishing and motoring to the many 
interesting places in the vicinity. On the eve of their anni- 
versary the Mitchell's gave a dinner party and dance in their 
chalet, Calavaras. 

CLARENCE POSTLEY has arrived from New York to pass the 
summer with his mother. Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran. The 
young man visited here on several other summer vacation 
periods. 

MRS CLARK THOMSON, who with her brother, James Tatter- 
sall has been in Europe for the past several months, has 
returned and is temporarily at the Fairmont Hotel before 
going to her home in Santa Barbara. 

THE MISSES HEAVER have returned to town and are at the 
Hotel Canterbury. 

INTIMATIONS 

MISS KATHARINE AND MISS CHRISTINE DONOHOE are trav- 
eling in Italy, where they are having a deliglitf.il time. They 
are making a leisurely tour of the country and expect to be 
there throughout July. 

MISS MARY DONOHOE has taken an apartment in Paris and 
will await the return of her sisters there, and Miss Barbara 
Donohoe has joined Sir Archibald and Lady Douglass-Dick 
at their villa on the Riviera for a several weeks stay. 
\XI> MRS JAMES .1. PAGAN (Dorothj Gebhardt) are the 
parents of a daughter born to them in this city a few <la>s 
ago. The Gebhardt-Fagan wedding was an event ot about 
two years ago. 



MR. 



MR. 



MR. 



\l.\llv CHARLES DE CAZOTTE ami Mr. and I de 

Cazotte left Sunday for the Atlantic coast, where they will 

enjoy a visii of several weeks before sailing for Europe. 
The De Cazottes have many relatives In the Eastern St 

who will meet Mr. De Cazotte's bride for the first lime, and 
there will be many entertainments tor the party before thej 
so abroad. Mr. de Cazotte will attain his majority in 
fall, and he will be obliged at that time In serve tor IS 
months in the French army. During this period of service 
his wife will make her home with his mother in I'aris. anil 
at its termination they will all enjoy a year's continental 
travel before their return to California. 

MR. EDWARD D. BEYLARD has closed his San Mateo home 
and he left last week for Europe to be gone for several 
months. He will first visit Captain and Mrs. Anthony Bryan 
in Treland and will then go to Paris to be the guest for a 
short space of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stetson. Later Mr. Bey- 
lard will travel through central and southern Europe. 

MRS. HERMAN Oelrichs has decided to occupy Rosecliff, her 
home in Newport, after an absence of several seasons. She 
has spent every summer abroad for the past few years. Her 
son, Mr. Herman Oelrichs, will spend the summer with her 
at Newport. 

MRS. CHARLES FARQUHARSON and Mrs. George Tallant are 
planning a trip abroad and expect to leave in September. 
Mrs. Tallant is passing the summer at her home in Santa. 
Barbara and Mrs. Farquharson has been visiting her there. 

MRS. MACONDRAY MOORE sailed for the United States after 
a delightful sojourn in Europe, where she has been for four 
months. 

MR. ROBERT HENDERSON will return shortly from Los An- 
geles, where he has been for the past week. He has been 
at the Hotel Ambassador while in the south. 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE G. MOORE have taken possession of 
the John Rothschild house in San Mateo, which they have 
leased for three years. They will divide the summer be- 
tween San Mateo and Pebble Beach, where they own a pretty' 
home. 

JUDGE AND MRS. FRANK DEASY are the parents of a little 
girl, born on Sunday, June 29. The child will probably be 
called Zeta Patricia, after her mother, who was Miss Zeta 
Mendel, the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. L. C. Mendel, before 
her marriage. 

DEL MONTE 

BRIGADIER GENERAL BRYLAND GRIMWADE, Mrs. Grimwade, 
and their son John Grimwade, of Australia, are interesting 
additions to the army circles now gathering at Del Monte. 
General Grimwade achieved unusual distinction during the 
war and is well known in this country. 

COL. AND MRS. R. P. TISDALE, Los Angeles, and Lt. Col. Robt. 
A. Roos and Mrs. Roos, Burlingame, are among the other 
a I laches to the Del Monte training camps now established 
at Hotel Del Monte. 

MR. AND MRS. C. D. KELLY, Chicago, who came to Monterey 
Peninsula several weeks ago with the view of selecting a 
home site, have taken the Byington Ford home at Pebble 
Beach for a three month period. Since their arrival, ex- 
cepting a short period spent in Santa Barbara, the Kellys 
have stayed at Del Monte Lodge. 



— Mrs. Brown: "I admire Dr. Young immensely. He is 

so persevering in the face of difficulties that he always re- 
minds me of Patience sitting' mi a monument." 

Mr. Brown: "Yes; lint what I am becoming rather 
alarmed about is the number of monuments sitting on his 
patients." 




AT YOUR 
SERVICE 



Frequent trains to Sacramento 
Observation car trains leave San Fran- 
cisco 7:20 and 9:00 a. m. and 

4:40 p. m. 
Dining car on 4:40 p. m. train 

San Francisco-Sacramento R. R. 

The Scenic Route 



rhe Name PIONEER 



4* _ • ^ 



on a box of office 
stationery, wheth- 
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Ask vour printer ^-j*svt . -*•*- _, 

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Established 1166 




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1349-51 Mission St., bet. Oth and 10th 

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We plate every description of metal 
work and goods with Gold, Silver, 
Nickel. Brass, Copper and Bronze in 
an elegant and durable manner. 

We call for and deliver work 

Automobile and Household Goods a 
Specialty 



42 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5. 1924 




By ANTISTHENES 
Leopards and Their Spots 

OME years ago an amendment to the city charter 
was voted on and carried by a large majority; it 
"blanketed" into the civil service, without examina- 
tion, a large number of political appointees, and. as 
was inevitable, goats came in with the sheep. Now, a goat 
is a goat, a leopard can't lost its spots nor a colored gentle- 
man his skin, and the aftermath of the blanketing process 
was the production — aside from the great accretion of 
valuable employees — of a quantity of hybrids neither civil 
service nor wholly political. 

Now, these civi-polies, with the recrudescence of each 
election, quicken to the feel of their old time avocation, 
when they were mere henchmen to aspiring candidates and 
they humbly scurried about in search of patronage crumbs 
that fell from their masters' tables. There is an unwritten 
law in the charter inhibiting civil service employees from 
participating in partisan politics; it is mandatory in the 
, police and fire departments and the large majority of city 
servants hew close to its observance. It is to weed out the 
few who do not that we propose to the Civil Service Com- 
mission, who can effect the change, that it observe this in- 
fraction of the spirit of the merit system and demote or 
otherwise punish the violators thereof. 

The great body of civil service employees takes umbrage 
at the activities of these sycophants and" it is ready to back 
the Commission in any action it may take in the premises. 
A particular offender we might mention is in the Recorder's 
office; how the Recorder may allow this man to indulge 
his varied political activities is beyond us, but, one or two 
other "blanketed" offices likewise have these parasites on 
their payrolls, and bona fide civil service employees are de- 
manding a stop be put to what they feel is a reflection on 
themselves. 



"Oi 



O'Dowd On William Jennings Bryan 
see, O'Dowd, phwhere Willum Jennins Bryan is 



agin John Davis av Wist Virginia fur prisidint; ( )i thought 
he were a good man fur the job, what?" 

'Well, O'Kane. Willum Jennings is phwhat ye call a 
leader, an' a leader isn't goin' to take advoice frum innywan 
— spicially before inny av the byes; 'twould look bad. fohn, 
an', loikely as not, put him back as a leader." 
"But. phwhoy is he agin McAdoo, O'Dowd?" 
"Phwhoy is innywan fur McAdoo. O'Kane — can ye tell 
me that? Bryan sez Davis is wid W.hall sthreet an' that's 
phwhoy he's agin him; but McAdoo wuz wid Doheeny an' 
Doheeny wuz wid the ile crowd av Tea Pot Doom, so, it's 
six av wan and half a dozen av the other. Oi'm nut sooper- 
stitious. John. — barrin' a few things — but it seems to me 
that Willum Jennins niver put himself behoind innything — 
excipt makin' money — an' inny luck come av it. Oi voted 
fur him wanst. an' so did ye. but we did it to plaze O'Con- 
nor av the nointh warrd. who wuz pramised a job if the 
Grreat Commner wuz dieted. But Willum is ivry bit av 
him a pollytician an' ye an' Oi don't know the half av 
phwhat's in his moind. ar phwhat he's out afther. Maybe 
he's lookin' a long way ahead an' the Chattyqua sermons 
arre becomin' played out. an' the attindance small ; an' thin 
again, a man kin preach a lot more av good about a defeated 
pollytician and cause, thin be cud ivver say about a wan 
elicted." 



"But. phwhoy didn't Willum Jennins sav innvthinsr a°-in 
the Kin Kluxes?" e S 

"Phwell. John, an' if yer audiance in the Chattyqua wuz 
made up av all koinds av payple, an', praps, some Kluxes 
among thim. an' ye spake agin the Kluxes. wud ye expict 
the Kluxes to drap a contrybution in the box whin ve passed 
it arround? As Higgins wanst sid : 'Aven in riligion. now- 
aday , the pracher must use paceful pinetration an' not 
affind the congregation, ar they'll go ilsewhere' ". 

"But. O'Dowd, maybe Willum is an the square." 

"Phwell, Oi'm not savin' he's not, John, fur Oi'll not 
judge innywan; but, if he is. he's wan av the few who'll be 
phwell off both here and in the worrld to conic." 

* * * 

— The new- revenue act provides a penalty of $2,000 in 
case a bootlegger or booze maker fails to pay taxes on the 
liquor he sells or makes! In other words, if you're a boot- 
legger and you pay the government $1,000 taxes for selling 
whiskey — or liquid dynamite — the government gathers in 
the one thousand — and you for selling it ! No inducement 
there, we'll say, for the liquor vendor to do his duty toward 
his government. 

* * * 

— Two other Chicago schoolboys write to Jacob Franks — 
whose son was murdered by Nathan and Loeb — demanding 
$8,000, threatening to kidnap Pranks' daughter if the money 
isn't paid! A proper sequel, and, we expect to see more of 
this as time goes on. for the youthful mind may pick this 
moral: it is a month since the two murderers committed 
their fiendish crime and they are not yet hanged — in fact, it 
is asserted thev never will hang! 

* * * 

— A dispatch from Durango, Mexico, states General 
Flores, candidate for the southern republic's presidency, is 
unable to continue his campaign on account of serious ill- 
ness. Possibly the intervention of a kind providence; a 
sick man may linger along for years — it's seldom, if ever, 

a Mexican president survives a full term. 

* * * 

— Juvenile delinquency in California has increased fifty 
per cent in the last two years, according to O. H. Close, 
superintendent of the Preston School of Industry! Sequel 
to promiscuous paroles, few hangings, indeterminate sen- 
tences, sparing the rod. and student control? 

* * * 

-A drunken driver is pursued for five miles in a wild 
chase down the crowded peninsula until traffic officer Eddie 
McAuliffe punctures one of the maniac's tires with a re- 
volver shot. Hut, why ruin a good tire — wasn't the crazy 
driver a better target? 

* * * 

— A woman in New York receives $30,000 damages for 
the death of her husband in a street car accident, although 
she admitted on the stand he was too lazy ever to work! 
The lady is to lie congratulated on her luck in turning a 

worthless liability into an asset. 

* * * 

— And now 'tis rumored McCormick, the harvester king, 
is to divorce Ganna, who essays operatic roles. Apparently, 
the rift in the lute is the latter's insistence she can sing. 
Mc is wealthy, but — all the king's horses and all the king's 
men couldn't make a songbird out of a hen. 

— It is indeed a dismal commentary upon the asserted pro- 
gressiveness of a twentieth century republic, when, in a 
great national political convention, even so little as a whis- 
per anent one's religious convictions is heard. 

* * * 

— Eleven convicts sentenced to life imprisonment at Fol- 
- • > i n penitentiary have been released on parole by the hoard 
of prison directors. Tins should quicken prospective mur- 
derers et al to take a chance: if the neck is saved, the future 
is assured. 



1924 



ANT) CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



43 



An Old Chartered Company 

EXISTING by virtue of a Royal Charter, of the grant- 
ing by Queen Victoria, the Royal Mail Steam Packet 
Company for eighty-five years has been carrying on 
mail, passenger, and cargo services to and from the 
many ports of the world in which for generations its name 
has been a household word. 

This company is represented at the British Empire Ex- 
hibition and there the visitor receives the most courteous 
treatment. Finding its quarters grown too small through 
the expansion of the business, the management has sought 
a greater space in which to do business and it has secured 
the most sightly situation for its future business, in the 
very center of the city of London, by buying one and a 
half acres of ground. This site is where another historic 
company was formerly located, the Great East India, com- 
monly called "John Company," founded in 1600, which laid 
the foundation of the Indian Empire. 

The quarters in Moorgate having grown too small, it 
was impossible to enlarge them by purchase, as the back 
part of the block belongs to H. M. Post Office and is occu- 
pied by the City Branch of Inland Revenue. 

The Royal Mail Steam Packet Company is not only erne 
of the greatest- factors in the shipping business of Great 
Britain, but its activities are so manifold that they extend 
all over the seven seas and every country of the civilized 
and uncivilized world receives a benefit through its activ- 
ities. Exclusive of the ships now building, the company 
owns forty-six vessels of over 366.000 tons gross register. 
This, together with the associated companies, will total 
over 2,120,000 gross register tons. The company is build- 
ing three large motor ships, two of them for the Brazil 
and River Plate business and the third for the North Pa- 
cific Trade. 

The Royal Mail Steam Packet Company is in every way 
keeping up with the advancing changes that have taken 
place in the shipping business and it may be said to lie 
one of the very few companies whose officers are so alert 
that the management and the service on their vessels leave 
nothing to lie desired. In San Francisco anyone desiring 
information of any kind may obtain it from Mr. A, ( I. 
Albertsen, or any of the courteous trained employees in his 
office. 

Mr. Albertsen is ver\ well known, not only on the Pa- 
cific (.'oast but all over the United States, mi account of his 
past and present activities and on a personal account. He 
lias a wonderful capacity for creating new business and re- 
taining old patronage for any company he may represent. 
The San Francisco News Letter has no hesitancy whatever 
in recommending its readers to him. when in want of in- 
formation, or when seeking the good services of his com- 
pany. 



OUR CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 

Saturday next a special edition of the News Letter will 
be issued, which will deal with important questions affect- 
ing a large section of the state adjacent to Carquinez 
Straits, from Vallejo to Sacramento, by the proposed build- 
ing of a great ship canal connecting Sacramento with the 

Pacific Ocean by way of San Francisco; the retaining of 

Mare Island as a naval base and other matters vital to the 
development of the central portion of California. This will 
In- profuselj illustrated, and will contain articles by the 
Mayor of Vallejo, United States naval officers and members 
of Chambers of Commerce "i the various cities. This num- 
ber will be of immense interest to all those who have the 
progress and development of California at heart, and will 
go towards proving that the San Francisco News Letter 
should be handed the palm as a producer of wonderful 
special editions. 



■■' ---- ■■■■■■ ■ 1 



Announcement 




EVENING SESSIONS 

for 

MEN and WOMEN 

Term Starts Wednesday 

August Twentieth 

1924 

Registration is limited 



The School is equipped with a well 
selected library of over 2000 Volumes, 
exclusively for the use of the students. 

The office is open from 12:00 to 2:00 
P. M.. and from 6:30 to 8:00 P. M.. 
excepting Saturdays and Holidays. 



Call or write TODAY 
fir information 



c*s> 



San Francisco Law School 

Call Building 

74 Mew Montgomery Stn-t-t 

Telephone Kearny 42^1 




lMSSSM-- 



44 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 



Pleasure's W^nd 




OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

Tom Moor >e 



Conducted by Thomas Ashe 



Hitchcock At Alcazar 

Contrary to accepted tradition — bar- 
ring the Merry Widow and a dismal 
other few— "The Caliph." Raymond 
Hitchcock's musical vehicle which, will 
continue indefinitely at the Alcazar, is 
replete with songs of a high order in- 
stead of the usual single tuneful thing 
redolent of most extravaganzas. And, 
more than that, exceptionally fine 
voices put these over, accompanied by 
a chorus of really pretty girls who sing 
as well as cavort. Of course, Hitch- 
cock himself has full charge of the 
laugh arrangements and is a master ol 
mirth, as convulsed audiences will tes- 
tify, while Cooper Lawley stands head 
and shoulders above most tenors we 
have recently heard here in musical 
comedies. Thomas Wilkes, the pro- 
ducer, should be very successful next 
season when he presents "The Caliph" 
to New York audiences. 



New Idea Marriage At Strand 

Fanny Hurst, authoress, has injected 
into "Daring Youth," at the Strand 
this week, some of the sensations of 
her own trial marriage. The play con- 
cerns a girl who marries, but who is 
not to be bound by marriage's conven- 
tions. Portrayed captivatingly by Bebe 
Daniels, and, the jealous husband 
handled by Norman Kerry, the plot 
works out most unsatisfactorially. 
Four days with her husband and three 
with whomever she will, is her ukase, 
and both live up scrupulously to the 
arrangement, the wife concealing her 
longing for her mate to show jealousy, 
and, the latter actually bursting there- 
with but not revealing his frenzy! It 
culminates in a big explosion of pent 
up feeling and, thereafter, they live 
happily — but in the old. old way. 
Rudy's Manhattan Orchestra is un- 



STAGE Training 

NATHANIEL ANDERSON 
Coach 

Director — Pacific Players 

THE LEGITIMATE WAY 

This is actual practice; no theory nor 
false methods; vital; professional. 

STUDIO 

506 Kohler & Chase Blrtg. 
Kearny 5454 



usually good and the short reels com- 
plete a very good program. 



Orpheum 

Acrobatic feats are taboo in smart 
vaudeville, but Frederick Sylvester & 
Co., in "The Neatest of the Xeat," this 
week at the Orpheum, are toppers and 
the act is quite unlike anything we 
have ever witnessed ; it is one of the 
best turns on this week's program. 
Richard Kean, in "Characters from 
Famous Plays," especially in "Peter 
the Miser." is gripping, and we would 
welcome him in some tragic roles with 
other characters as foil to his masterful 
interpretation. Phil Baker, in "A Bad 
Boy from a Good Family," has im- 
proved, and keeps the house in an up- 
roar, aided and abetted offside by a 
member or two of "The Ramsdell & 
Deyo" trio who present "A Smart 
Dance Offering." Adele Rowland sings 
in her usual charming way and Harry 
Carrol presents a first class revue of 
pretty girls, good songs and general 
pep. Monday night two champions, 
Lieutenant Russell Maughan and Jack 
Dempsey, were in the audience and re- 
sponded with a few words to repeated 
and insistent calls of "speech, speech." 



Cameo 

Perhaps you remember Mrs. Fiske in 
"Leah Kleschna?" So long ago now. 
that we hate to count the years! At 
any rate it was in our "spring chicken" 
days, when our ears were as alert as a 
jack rabbit's, and even then we had to 
strain them to find out what on earth 
Mrs. Fiske was saying in those numer- 
ous tense moments that go tu make 
up this play of the Parisian under- 
world. \\"e find the Parisian under- 
world rather tame stuff, at the Cameo 
this week, under the appelation "A 
Moral Sinner." Dorothy Dalton, star- 
ring, is a very refined little Leah 
Kleschna, her father. Anton Kleschna, 
is a picture (in evening dress) of a 
very fine gentleman, ami James Rennie 
makes such an altogether restrained 
and pleasant prefet that we wouldn't at 
all mind being arrested by him. And 
he is so good looking ! 

The closing scene in Normandy with 
fruit blossoms swaying in the wind is 
a much prettier setting than "Leah 
Klesehna's" rows of prosaic cabbages 
— do you remember? — and we found u 
a great relief to watch the two lovers 



wander off under the fragrant boughs, 
instead of indulging in the inevitable 
kiss which ends most movies. No one 
looks pretty, anyway, to the observer, 
when they kiss, especially if they kiss 
very hard ! 

The series of racing stories, called 
"High Steppers'' which the Cameo 
runs, are as fine as ever this week. The 
part of "Ma McGuire" (is that her 
name?) is so likeable that we would 
go to the Cameo just to see her alone, 
aside from the fascination of equine 
ankles on the race track. Tom Cooper 
is as melodious as usual, and there is 
the usual funny film. This Saturday 
cc Hues Jack Hoxie in "Ridgway of 
Montana." 



Warfield 

America's gravest problem — prohibi- 
tion — is the theme of the latest Thos. 
H. Ince drama, "Those Who Dance," 
which comes to the Warfield Theatre 
on Saturday to follow the current at- 
traction, Colleen Moore in "The Per- 
fect Flapper." "Those Who Dance" 
tells of rum makers, whiskey runners, 
hi-jackers and the evil of the bootleg- 
ger. The story is timely, melo-dramatic 
and. all in all. mighty good entertain- 
ment. An unusual cast is headed by 
Blanche Sweet. Warner Baxter, Bessie 
Love and Mathew Betz. 

'hi the stage Fanchon and Marco 
will present a revival of the beautiful 
"gypsy scene" from their musical com- 
edy success. "Sunkist." Boyce Combe. 
Helene Hughes, Harold Stanton and 
the Sunkist Beauty Chorus, together 
with other principals, will make merry 
in a scene picture that will be unusual. 

Among the shorter film subjects will 
lie "Family Life." a Mermaid comedy, 
the news, digest and cartoon. Lip- 
schultz and the Music Masters will be 
heard in concert. 



+■ — ■. — .. — .. — .. — .. — ., — .. — .. — ,. — „ — ,. — .. — . — ., 

St. Mary's 


oAcademy 


San Leandro, California 


For particulars address 


SISTER SUP6RI0R 


Select Boarding and Day School under 


the direction of the Sisters of St. 


Dominic 
* . — . — ._.._.._. — .,_,. — ._„_.._., — i 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 301 San Francisco 



July 5, 1924 

Film Flicks 

"Graed'' Is Produced At Last 

The print of "Greed." the film pro- 
duction which Eric \'<m Stroheim has 

adapted from Frank Norris' story "Mc- 
Teagne," has arrived in New York. 
Rex Ingram, a great admirer of Von 
Stroheim. says of it: "Greatest piece of 
production I have ever seen. Such com- 
pelling- and soul baring characteriza- 
tions so far unknown to either stage 
or screen. Comedy relief wonderful. 
Climax tremendous. Am proud of you, 
Eric !" It will be remembered that a 
portion of "Greed" was filmed in San 
Francisco in the vicinity of Hayes & 
Laguna streets, and the rest of it in 
various locations of California. It is a 
Californian story, and one of Frank 
Norris' best. 



Hugo Ballin, now filming Arthur 
Stringer's novel. "The Prairie Wife," 
is probably the most versatile director 
in the movies. 

_ Besides being a director of distinc- 
tion, he is a novelist, an art director, 
and before his entrance into pictures, 
was a prominent artist. 

"The Prairie Wife" is the first pic- 
ture Ballin has made since "Vanity 
Fair," almost two years ago. He has 
siicnt the time writing and traveling. 
The cast of the current production in- 
cludes Dorothy Devore, Herbert Raw- 
iinson and Gibson Gowland. 



Hospitality and sunburn are two of 
Arizona's greatest resources, accord- 
ing to Reginald Barker, Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer directors who returned 
from the neighboring state this week 
following a 2,900 location hunting trip 
in the interests of "The Great Divide" 
in which Conway Tearle and Alice 
Terr} are to be starred. 

Their first stop was at the Grand 
Canyon. They traveled 16 miles on 
muleback the first day and 29 on the 
second. On the third day only Schenck, 
a former cavalry sergeant, was able to 
walk with any degree of comfort. The 
saddles were like stove tops and the 
mules were afflicted with stiff legs so 
that their riders jolted with even step, 

For 240 miles, between Phoenix and 
Globe, they traveled through air that 
was like one continuous blast from ,i 
white hot furnace These conditions 
will be faced again when Mr. I'.arker 
takes his company there. 

v ^y° u P a X no more ^ 



BEST FLOWER 




"TV^foice <y^a Thousand Gardens" 

224-226 Grant Ave Tel Kearny 4975 



AND) CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

Once more. Europe has made a vic- 
torious invasion of Hollywood. 

The latest conqueror of the picture 
colony is Paulette Du Yal, a striking- 
French beauty, who has been famous 
for several years in Paris and other 
Continental cities as a dancer. Miss 
Du Yal was brought to America some 
time ago for the Zieg-feld Follies, and 
while dancing in New York was "dis- 
covered" anew and given a part in 
Rodolph Valentino's latest picture, 
which was made in the East. Imme- 
diately upon her arrival here she was 
selected by Irving G. Thalberg for the 
important role of the lion tamer in Vic- 
tor Seastrom's production, "He Who 
Gets Slapped," now under way at the 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios. 



45 



King- Vidor once more has trans- 
ferred his activities from set to cutting 
room. Now he is editing "His Hour," 
the Elinor Glyn story which he di- 
rected for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. John 
Gilbert and Aileen Pringle play the 
leading roles in this colorful story of 
imperial Russia before the revolution. 

"His Hour" is the fifth picture Vidor 
has directed since he signed with the 
company less than two years ago. The 
others were "Three Wise Fools," 
"Wild Oranges," "Happiness," and a 
picturization of Rachel Crothers' stage 
success, "Mary the Third," which has 
not yet been definitely titled. 




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Feather River Inn 

Blairsden, Plumas County, Calif. 

California's Ideal Mountain 

Resort — Opens June 14th 

rh h / i'l"! f Cou, ' se opened 1321 is one of 
3<H0 ™eflf « rsBS ln California— 9 holes, 

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Casa De Manana 

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"Before They 
Went to Congress" 



is an interesting page 
in next Sunday's pic- 
torial section, ft shows 
ten of our present law- 
makers busily engaged 
in the line of work 
they followed before 
Congress called them. 
The vacationists will 
get some pointers from 
some attractive pic- 
tures "Where Vacation 
Calls. ■• The womenfolk 
will find in 



"Advance 
Fall Fashions" 



some pictures of com- 
ing styles which will 
please the eye. and 
probably devastate the 
pocketbook. "Pagean- 
try of Europe" ranges 
from royalty to race- 
horses; there are many 
familiar faces shown in 
"Youth and Age." and 
the frontis-page, with its 
"Vagaries of Art." is, to 
say the least, a bit un- 
usual. You cant afford 
to miss the 



Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



46 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 





financial; 




By P. N. Beringer 

THE merry mouth of May by all reports shows up not 
so good in regard to business as the preceding 
months. When the various businesses are ex- 
amined, not much information is gained thereby, so 
it shows us that the drop must have been in about every line 
of sales endeavor. Why? There can be no general reason 
assigned except that the election campaign bugaboo got to 
work on the nerves of the buying public and affected the 
slight changes in all directions, bringing about the general 
result of poorer business. 

* * * 

An Expert Opinion 

Edward Chambers, the vice president of the Santa Fe 
System, while here the other day, expressed himself, on the 
other hand, that, after an examination into condition along 
the Santa Fe Coast Lines and from Chicago to the Gulf, 
that not part of the whole country was in better condition. 
He added that a marked improvement would occur with 
the marketing of the crops in this state this summer. 

He said the Santa Fe anticipating this crop marketing had 
expended $25,000,000 for new cars, locomotives and other 
equipment. Mr. Chambers spoke of the shortage of water 
in California this year, and he said that tin's certainly would 
lead to the building of large reservoirs and dams which will 
serve to store up a reserve for both domestic and irrigation 
purposes. These reservoirs and dams will also serve to in- 
crease the hydro-electric power for industrial purposes. 

* * * 

The Air Mail 

The air mail service by the government between San 
Francisco and New York is now on, and will probably be 
continued as a regular arm of the mail facilities granted the 
people by Uncle Sam. The charge for carrying letters and 
other articles as the service grows, is but slightly in excess 
of the ordinary charge now made for letters and for parcels. 
We are just that much nearer to New York. 

Maughan says that in a very short while others will be 
doing just what he did in crossing the country in the period 
between dawn to dusk, and one other flier states that this 
will probably be a regular thing when the planes have 
been perfected and that it will be a non-stop run. This 
may be so. It depends on the capacity of the plane to carry 
sufficient gasoline and oil and on the' ability of the man at 
the wheel to stand the physical strain of from fifteen to 
twenty hours of constant travel. 
* * # 

Reclaiming Scrap 

The words "rags, bottles, sacks" will bring almost in- 
stantly to mind the thought of a bearded man with loose 
fitting clothing seated on a creaking wagon drawn by a 
slow-moving horse. 

While the railroads cannot be placed in the "junkman" 
class, a report just made public by the Southern Pacific 
reveals that last year a savings of $2,531,878.72 was made 
through the accumulation and reclamation of materials that 
might ordinarily be classed as worthless. 

Reclamation of material netted a saving of $612,055.32 
and the sale or use by the company of scrap amounted to 
$1,018,923.40, it was stated in the report, covering the Pa- 
cific System of the railroad, by A. S. McKelligon, general 
storekeeper. 

Anything at all, that can be reclaimed and used again or 
sold as scrap, is saved. 



Insurance 

Those who may be interested should visit the new offices 
of the St. Paul Fire and Marine, the American Central, the 
Royal Exchange Assurance, the London and Scottish As- 
surance Corporation, and Lloyd's Plate Glass Insurance, at 
60 Sansome street. The expansion of the business of the 
Benjamin Goodwin agency made this move necessary. 

R. L. Stephenson is sure to lose the smile that will not 
come off, now that in addition to being the general manager 
of the Union Central Life Insurance he has been made the 
golf commissioner of the Kiwanis club. I am sorry, be- 
cause his smile is surely contagious. 

Shasta County is the abiding place of Frank de Lisle, 
the insurance broker, for about a month. He is taking a 
well earned vacation. 

A. I.ange. the publicity manager for the Fireman's Fund 
and editor of the "Fireman's Fund Record" is spending his 
capacity to enjoy a vacation on the shores of Tahoe. 
* * * 

Comments On Foreign Affairs 

After a long conference with MacDonald the French 
Premier Herriott returned to France to ask for a vote of 
confidence and an endorsement of the stand taken by him 
while in England. It seems the Britisher did not agree at 
a 1 ! in Herriott's plan to remain in the Ruhr and hold that 
section of Germany until such time as Germanv showed by 
actual payments an honest intent to accept the findings of 
the Dawes Committee as final and go to work paving up on 
reparations. The Britisher believed that France should get 
out immediately. But Herriott knew full well that he had 
to carry out the Poincare policy, that he could not change 
it. So he came home and asked for this vote in the Cham- 
ber of Deputies. Now, let us see what followed; the socia- 
lists refrained from voting, the communists voted against 
Herriott ninety strong. But Herriott got the vote of con- 
fidence he was after from the sane and safe delegates. This 
is truly a very funny situation. Here we have Herriott, 
whose party does not endorse him, and who was elected 
by that party and others because he was supposed to be op- 
posed to Poincare's ideas, receiving an endorsement be- 
cause he is striving to enforce the self same policies as 
those advocated by Poincare. 



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luly 5, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



47 



]JBF$I^T?IBLE 





JZZgjgSS^, , 



By KEM 

"There is a new absence of long moralizing and comment The 
author says 'Here's the story. Think what you choose of it " He 
is absolutely non-committal. He adopts the attitude of imper- 
sonality. It is much like Zola's theory of acting like a scientist 
in this regard. The author has certain character to work with 
as the scientist has specimens, and he develops them."— Raymond 
u. Havens. 

tlfinffHE GREEN BAY TREE, by Louis Bromfield, is 
a story of a modern heroine, Lily Shane, who' in 
J^ the language of the publisher is" "a woman who 
belongs to no age or civilization." We get ac- 
quainted with Lily first at a garden party held in a "formal 
park, part of the rich heritage of her family left to her 
eccentric young-old mother, her hyper-sensitive sister and 
her ripely beautiful self, by her father, John Shane. John 
Shane has been dead ten years when we meet his family, 
but his personality is never forgotten. The author gives us 
portraits of real men and women, and we can understand 
the daughters better for the description of their father: "a 
lean face, swarthy and flushed with too much drinking, the 
lips red and sensual yet somehow firm and cruel — the face 
of one possessed, a countenance that somehow was both 
handsome and ugly ... a sensitive man — a gentleman of 
his time, a duelist, a creature haunted by a temper verging 
upon insanity." The stage is set at the beginning of the 
story with characters who have been shaped or set going 
by this same "handsome-ugly" John Shane: his wife! July 
Shane, richly dressed, lame, leaning on her ebony stick, 
viewing her guests from a distance with a faint smile of 
mockery; her daughter, Lily, who charms all, and the gov- 
ernor of the state, who wishes to marry her, and whom nine 
out of ten women would have married under the circum- 
stances. But John Shane's daughter, with her father's 
fascination, her desire t>> be free, her taste for the life of 
adventure chooses to run counter to all rules of conventional 
living; and last Irene, the pretty, anaemic younger si>ter, 
an "outsider — a roomer" always in her mother's home who 
drifts finally into morbid fanaticism because at the im- 
pressionable adolescent age she becomes acquainted with 
her sister's shameful secret. 

The book has atmosphere and charm and though just 
out this spring, is already in its fourth printing. 

The author gives us a cross section of Lily's life and 
leaves us to draw our own conclusions. The unthinking 
reader finds her, like Milla Cather's "Lost Lady" always 
fascinating, generous with her large fortune, kindly dis- 
posed in her indolent way — really a line character, harming 
no one. "quite a gallant figure" lie will maintain, lie does 
not understand the author's artistry in leaving it to his well- 
chosen title to hint to us of Lily's lot. when she can no 
longer joy in her youth and beauty — when all the deeds 
done in the flesh are uncovered. The wantonness thai 
robbed her sister of her youth, her son of a father, and her 
generation of the best of her womanly charm and wit — for 
the Hebrew poet knew life when he wrote the psalm: "1 
have seen the wicked in great power flourishing like a 
green bay tree — yet he passed away, and lo, he was not. — 
Mark the perfect man and behold the upright — for the end 
of that man is peace." 

Stokes. $2.00. 

* * * 

The readers of mystery and detective stories all over the 
country, and their number is legion, have lost by the death 
of Isabel < >strander, four different authors in this line. She 
averaged tour novels a year writing under three pen names 



—As Robert Chipperfield she brought out recently 

I.KK.lIl LIGHTS;" under the name of David Fox 
"Tin'. HANDWRITING ON Till'. WALL;" and as 
Douglas Grant "TWO GUN SUE;" and her last novel, 
under her own name. Isabel Ostrander. a mystery story 
prophetically titled "DUST TO DUST." The stories were 
all characteristically different, but liked by different types 
of readers. Many men will not read a mystery or detec- 
tive story written by a woman, but eagerfv devoured any- 
thing from the pen of "Robert Chipperfield." Because of 
this discrimination many women writers find a wider mar- 
ket by annexing a mannish pseudonym, and smile as they 
hear men emphatically state: "No woman can write a 
satisfactory detective story, or paint a real man." 

Mrs. Ostrander's books were all published by the Mc- 
Bride Company. Price $2.00. 



Cars Washed and Polished 

While You Wait, New Process. Cars Called For and Delivered 

Without Additional Charge 

Simonizing U Flushing Top Dressing 

Super Glossing Greasing Crank Case Flushing 

Alemite Service 

Phone Graystone 970 
1430 Bush Street 



PALACE AUTO LAUNDRY 



John Eversman, Manager 



'Mayerle Glasses 



Correct Astigmatism 
Relieve Eye Strain 




Scientific Eye JSxa mi tuition 

29 Yenr9 ' ^tS 1 Pr '' c " c ' , '" 960 Market St. 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

WHY 

i It's the water and the table) 
Located in tin- Valley of the Moon, close to General Vallejo and Jack 

! don'S homes; t, r <df links close by ; sulphur water swimming pool. 

65x85, and private tub baths ; fireproof hotel. If you want health 
and rest, give \is a trial. Write for booklet. T. H. CORCORAN, Prop. 
See Peek-Judah. Agua Caliente. Sonoma Co. 




MART HERETH 



CAROLINE JONES 



Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30, 
and tea from 3 to 5 



''i^ 11 334 5UTILR5TKEET Douglas 7118 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 
Pioneer Steam Carpet Beating Works 

Sewing and Relaying of Carpets a Specialty. Special Attention tu 
Carpet Dyeing. Class c Fire-Proof Bldg. 



353-357 Tehama S 



Telephone Douglas 3081 



MtlamalpaislSf^ 

MT. TAMALPAIS & MUIR WOODS RAILWAY 
712 Market St., Phone Garfield 4560 



^i = s = JJggssIIIIIIS=S'aIsc5aKSSS4Si.Mia«aS!:~« 
1 Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

« PAUL ELDER'S 

\NT> PAll. ELDERS LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco 



48 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 



TownMLCrier 




WHO THEDEWLAffT THOU 
"ONE TH/tTWILL PLAYTHE 
DEUIL,5IP WITH YOU" 

SMkspeare* 



— The "culprit" was J. Cameron, and he served six years 
for murder, during' which he was sour on the world, and 
violently protesting his innocence. Then he was paroled, 
and he continued to proclaim he was not guilty, until an- 
other three years passed, when the real murderer out at sea 
committed suicide, after putting a note in a bottle which 
drifting in and picked up proclaimed the innocence of the 

other man. 

* * * 

— A play was put on in New York about seven years ago 
tending to show it should be the duty of the prosecutor 
to prove innocence as well as guilt. In the case at hand no 
doubt the district attorney had a great time convicting the 
innocent man. We can imagine a smugness, a complaceny 
and pride and virtuous self-satisfaction on his part while 
surely pushing his man behind the prison bars, the renewed 
feeling of virtue in his purpose when after conviction on two 
appeals to higher courts, the prisoner's doom was con- 
firmed, his pleas being denied. On January 14, 1915, Cam- 
eron was sentenced to San Ouentin for life. He was paroled 
in 1921. 

The prosecuting attorney is now a successful criminal 
lawyer in Oakland; the Judge who sentenced the man is a 
supreme court justice, and the jury, which deliberated five 

minutes, is scattered. 

* * * 

— We did not see Ethel Barrymore this time, and are not 
in position to criticize her late particular performance, and 
therefore we cannot say she acted as is her wont as if the 
grace of her words are too precious to hear, with a sort of 
air that she is too aristocratic, really, to be an actress any- 
wav. and with her society mumble ( English according to 
G. Bernard Shaw). This is hardly fair, no doubt, as we 
purposely avoided seeing her in "The Laughing Lady." One 
thing we will say, however, she is a grand lady. 

* # * 

— A chauffeur in town says he had to spank a couple of 
sens of the very wealthy, because their was no peace with 
them otherwise. They played such tricks as throwing mud 
at the automobile as he cleaned it, telling their father to 
"Go to h — !" breaking the furniture and generally acting 
as if nobody was alive but themselves. In taking a new 
country seat, the boys initiated it for the family by jumping 
in the beds with their unclean shoes; and when the place 
was given up, the parents would pay to the owners a few 
thousand dollars damages to furnishings. Thev ruined the 
flower beds about every week. Thev particularly loved t'i 
trample in flower beds. The chauffeur is confident they 
will turn out badly. 

* * # 

— Another character of the streets is the whistling negro 
blind man. Who takes care of him, one wonders, lie is 
always cheerful and asks no help but to be taken across 
each street as he comes to it. I was curious as 1 saw him 
standing all alone on a corner waiting for somebody to 
take him by the arm and lead him to the other side. I 
wanted to see if he would know I was passing him as 1 did 
so in the din of traffic. He did; as I neared him he asked 
for the aid. When I had towed him safely across, instead 
of the "God bless you" the beggar bestows, he wished me 
"all the luck in the world." If yon are superstitious and 
meet the coloured man. you can have the chance to be sent 
auspiciously on your way with his benediction, and it will 
not cost you a pauper's piece of change. For further in- 
formation, he dresses well, wears a derbv. and is young:. 



— There is a phase in the Japanese exclusion bill that be- 
comes plainer in the interpretation as time passes. The act 
was no doubt inevitable, and it is hard to say whether it 
was possible without offending the sensibilities of the Japs, 
but we cannot claim for congress that it considered the ef- 
forts of the diplomatic service to take the sting out of the 
enactment, which, by the way, did not name particularly the 
Japanese people as overrunning the country to a point of 
danger. That the latter have truly taken the matter to heart 
is proved by their day set aside for humiliation, and their 
suicides. 

* * * 

— When Thomas Dixon wrote his book, "The Clansman." 
it was an echo of the past. The danger was not where he 
put it exactly, but in the possibility that we had among us 
a man so living in the other days of prejudice that he would 
try to make the public mind hark back to them. It is not 
a question of what the clansmen think they must organize 
for, so much as they would set themselves up again to super- 
cede the government. Strange, too, that they again became 
so numerous to cause a fight in the Democratic convention 
for their suppression, and that they were powerful enough 
to put the fear in the Bourbons, who in their desire for a 
religious liberty plank, did not single out by name the 
secret organization that is responsible for so many outrages 
against private individuals and the law of the country. 

— What is the matter with the youth of the country? We 
speak of their late records in crime. Down in Los Angeles 
a lad of twenty boasts to his credit 1500 burglaries in the 
last eight years, which, stopping to think, means he began 
at twelve, the last years of the war. It is a question if the 
war is responsible generally for the orgy of crime, the des- 
perate way the law is broken, without masks, and the little 
regard for life shown. 



Old Curiosity Shop 

Not often do we hear of an antique shop which is able to 
furnish a house complete, with every minute detail carefully 
carried out. Such is the distinction of the Old Curiosity 
Shop, in Tillmann Place. It has furnished a certain mil- 
lionaire's home down the peninsula from top to bottom, 
and in addition has supplied all the garden furniture, in- 
cluding some very fine fountains. Most of the rooms in 
this mansion are furnished with period furniture, and the 
living room boasts an 1861 spinnet, which would be the 
delight of the antique lover. Pictures of this interesting 
home and garden can be seen at the Old Curiosity Shop 
in that sunny little court off Grant Ave. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Van New* Ave., at Geary Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Is the most refined family hotel tn the city 
— a home unsurpassed 



ELMER M. WOODBURY Manager 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 
RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, FLUMES, 
PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 
San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market St. 5717 Santa Fe Are. 



TAKE THIS FROM ME! 

Don't experiment with motor oils. 

Insist on a top-notch, satisfactory article. 



it's 



MONOGRAM 



.K S l'»24 



AND CALIFl >RNIA ADVERTISER 






THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

(The San Pranclsco Bank) 
S26 California si. (and Branches), San Francisco 
For the quarter year ending June 30, 1924, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four 
unci cine Quarter (4)4) per cent per annum on 
all deposits, payable on and after July 1, 1924. 
Dividends not called for are added to the deposit 
account and earn interest from July 1. 1924. 
Deposits made on or before July 10, 1924, will 
earn interest from July 1. 1924. 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary. 

ITALIAN- AMERICAN BANK 

S. E. corner Montgomery and Sacramento sts. ; 
North Beach branch, corner Columbus ave, and 
Broadway ; Columbus branch, cor. Montgomery 
and Washington streets. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1924. a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of four and 
one-quarter I 1 1 % ) per cent per annum on all 
savings deposits, payable on and after July 1, 
1924. Dividends not called for will be added to 
the principal and bear the same rate of interest 
from July 1, 1924. Deposits made on or before 
July 10, 1924, will earn interest from July 1, 
192 4. 

A. E. SBARBORO, President. 



THE UIBEKMA SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY 

Corner Market, McAllister and Jones streets. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1924, a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum on all deposits, payable on 
and after July 1, 1924. Dividends not drawn will 
be added to depositors' accounts, become a part 
thereof, and will earn dividends from July 1, 
1924. Deposits made on or before July 10, 1924, 
will earn interest from July 1, 1924. 

J. O. TOBIN, Vice-president. 



THE FRENCH-AMERICAN BANK 

(Savings Department) 108 Sutter street and 
Branches 

For the half year ending June 30, 1924, a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of four and 
one-quarter (4*4) per cent per annum on all de- 
posits, payable on and after July 1, 1924. Divi- 
dends not called for are added to and bear the 
same rate of interest as the principal from July 
1, 1924. Deposits made on or before July 10, 
1924, will earn interest from July 1, 1924. 

LEON BOCQUERAZ, President. 

BANK OF ITALY 

Head Office, and San Francisco Branches. 
For the half-year ending June 30, 1924, a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum on all Savings Deposits, pay- 
able on and after July 1, 1924, Dividends not 
called for are added to and bear the same rate 
of interest as the principal from July 1, 1924. 
Savings Deposits made on the first business day 
of any month (or on or before the tenth day of 
January, April, July and October) will earn in- 
terest from the first of that month; deposits 
made after said dates will earn interest from 
the first of the following month. 
A. P. GIANN1NI. President. 

HUMBOLDT BANK 

Humboldt Bank, 783 Market street, near Fourth; 
Bush-Montgomery branch, Mills Bldg. 
For half year ending June 30, IHL'4. a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of four (4) per 
cent per annum on savings deposits, payable 
on and after July 1, 1921. Dividends not called 
for bear interest from July 1. 1921. Monej de- 
posited on or before July 10, 19 2 4. will earn 
interest from July 1, 1921. 

H. C. KX.EVESAHL, Cashier. 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 

Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 

BEST SERVES IS 



SecoNQ speeDS 



s&rfS* 



California Gets $2,464,990 Federal Aid 
Appropriation 

California will receive a Federal aid 
appropriation of $2,464,990.78 under ap- 
portionments made recently by the 
Secretary of Agriculture. 

Provision for Federal aid for the fis- 
cal year 1925 which begins July 1 is 
made under authority granted in the 
Agricultural Appropriation Bill signed 
by the President on June 5. The" bill 
empowers the secretary of Agriculture 
to apportion to the states the $75,000,- 
000 authorized in the Post Office Ap- 
propriation act of June 19, 1922. 

This Federal assistance will enable 
many western states to continue high- 
way building that would not be able 
to build roads without it because of 
the large area of untaxable public 
lands within their borders. The State 
Automobile Association was one of the 
leaders in securing the passage of the 
Federal aid act and is now endeavoring 
to secure Federal assistance in main- 
taining roads built by the western 
states with Federal aid funds. 



Modern Drivers Often Lack 
Personal Skill 

It would lie a very good thing for 
motoring if every driver would have an 
occasional opportunity to drive smiif 
old car that is equipped with trouble- 
some controls, and he or she would in- 
stantly recognize the danger of relying 
entirely upon the precision of the con- 
trols 'of the present day cars. Each 
would discover that it was the car 
and not his skill that was helping him 
to "get by" so easily. 

So much reliance is placed upon the 
cars themselves today that man} driv- 
ers are unable to shift back into sec- 
ond speed when goingf down hill with- 
out coming to a dead step. They are 
getting out of practice because their 
brakes arc so reliable that they feel 
there are very few hills where second 
is essential. 

rile automobile may be getting fool 
proof, but better results would be had 
and there would be fewer accidents 
even with modern cars if all drivers 
would act on the assumption that the 
personal element in operating the car's 
controls is still as essential as ever; 



Auto Trunks 

AUTOMOBILE TRUNKS AND 

TRUNK RACKS 

W. It. Main A Oo, 

2010 Van PTese .Ave. San Fiamisoo, Cal. 



Casa De Manana 

La Jolla, California 

Opens July 3rd 

Southern California's Newest and Most 
Beautiful All Year-round Resort l totel. 
Eighteen Hole Golf Course. Tennis. 
Horseback Riding, Ocean Bathing. Finest 
Climate in the United States. Tempera- 
ture ranges from 55 to 85 — Delightfully 
cool all summer. Write for illustrated 
folder. 

W. W. BROWN". Manager. 
Casa de Manana La Jolla, Calif. 

Feather River Inn 

Blairsden, Plumas County, Calif. 

California's Ideal Mountain 

Resort — Opens June 14th 

The Gold Course opened 1921, is one of 
the best courses in California — 9 holes, 
3050 yards, fine grass greens. Jim Smith, 
Golf Professional. Finest lake and stream 
trout fishing in the state. Horseback 
riding. Hiking, Motoring, Swimming, 
Bowling, Tennis. Fine Orchestra — Danc- 
ing every evening. Excellent motor roads 
from all directions. For rates and reser- 
vations and illustrated folder, address, 
Feather River Inn. 

Write for California's Ideal Tour 

Both Hotels Operated by "Van Noy- 

Interstate Co. 

Walter Rounsevel, Mgr., Feather River 

Inn. 



EL VERANO VILLA 

Surrounded by beautiful grove of trees. 
Country Resort for families. Open all 
year. Motion pictures, dancing pavi- 
lion, bowling alley. Free bus to Min- 
ral Springs daily. Kates $14 week up. 
Capt. A. TULLETT. Prop.; Marcel. Mgr., 
El Verano. Sonoma Co.. or Peek-Judak. 



Myrtledale Hot Springs 

The Wonder of t lie Pacific Coast 

in the Napa Valley 

Modern Hotel Geyser Heated Rooms 

Natural Mud, Steam, Sulphur Baths 

Swimming and Amusements 

R. Roy Leveira, Prop. 

Calistoga, Cal. 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gourh 
Telephone Park Z71 



50 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 



M /Zm&L WL. /Mi iAflaW /IMMOk.. Eft 



1 

a 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 1 6 San Bruno, Cal. 



NEW SHARON GRILL 

Louis Cerles 
Jean Barrere 
John Piegth, 

Props. 

Formerly 

Bergez-Frank's Old 

Poodle Dog, Bush St. 

French Table-D'Hote 

Dinner Served 

Sundays & Holidays 

$1.25 

35 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

rhone Sutter 8668 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4586 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
91.26 

Meuli Served a la Carte. Alio Beg-nlar 

French and Italian Dinners 
FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor sbould leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.).. 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. $1.75 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 

Bet. ISth and 19th Sts. 

Telephone Market 64 San Francisco 



Wielands 

.**r*>*rsv 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



me ^ 

MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HFXEON - 
process. 



gjiK; X I! II X, X X X ,K XX ,g X IK g,X fifil 




ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



Teeth 



A minute examination of your teeth 
made several times a year will enable 
you to arrest any Incipient disease of the 
gums before It has a chance to reach the 
acute stage. Our examinations are free. 
If there Is no Immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk It over. Red gums 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. You will 
like our nerve blocking system; It takes 
away all the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Garfield 835 
SPECIALISTS — Extraction!: Crowns: 
Self CleanBlng- Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; 7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



iXXXXXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXXX XX XXX x xxxx ■: X XX xxxxxxxxxi 




N W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Every Woman 

Should 

Look Her Best 

Keep her hair trimmed, shingled 
or bobbed. 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 



HI5 Clement St. I 



San Francisco. 



300 Geary St. | 

2331 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley 

Established 28 Years. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



ne photographed this year on your 



Birthday 



^ 




YHed^mt^a 




I 140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin 3685 




521 Pout Street 
In Virginia Hotel 



Studios In all Principal Cities of California 
Oakland San Francisco 

408 14th St. 41 Grant Ave. 






Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobiles 
Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Blacksmlthlng 

II. W. Culver M. Daberer E. Johnson 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suits Pressed by Hand. Only — 
Suits Called for aud Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 2510 



aKKKKil K KH » K"KH "«'««"» «.«■* H S H:K H.H.H""H.K "»"« » 



Soft or loud 
at willwith 
New7ypefr3 



y& 



Give expression to radio music with Magnavox. A 
touch of the finger on the new R-3 controls the tone 
as effectively as though baton in hand you directed the 
program in person — hushed to a mere wisp of dulcet 
tone, or reversed in an instant to a great swelling surge 
of rhythmic melody, and a gamut of in-between varia- 
tions to run at fancy. No radio receiving set is com- 
plete without Magnavox. Realize how supremely true 
that is, by asking the radio dealer nearest you' fur a 
demonstration of marvelous new R-3. Made by — 

MAGNAVOX COMPANY, OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 




Uagnavox 

tWM ' Radio 

M W M jhe Reproducer <§upreme 



52 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 






— When the State of Oklahoma was first admitted into 
the Union in 1907 there were a number of native Indians 
who resided on the territory which had made up the Indian 
Territory living in polygamy. One middle-aged Indian brave 
was said to have six wives. The State officials of the newly 
formed State decided that they must break up the practice 
of the Indians having more than one wife, but they did not 
want to deal harshly with them from the first. So the man 
having six wives was ordered brought into the district court 
to be reprimanded and instructed. He was brought before 
the court and the judge on the bench said to him: "The 
sheriff tells me that you have six wives. It is my duty to 
inform you that this is against the law. It is wrong and 
you cannot be permitted to have more than one wife. We 
are not going to punish you now, but you must go back to 
your home and select the one wife that you wish to have 
for your permanent and only wife. You must tell vour other 
wives that you cannot live with them any more ; that you 
can only have one wife and that they (the others) must go 
their way; that you can no longer be the husband of anv 
of them but the one selected by you." 

When the judge had finished the Indian looked up and 
said slowly and deliberately. "You tell 'em." 

— "John, you really ought not to eat that lobster salad," 
said Mary, warningly. 

"Now, look here, Mary, I've had a jolly hard morning," 
retorted John. "I've helped you to buy half a million useless 
Christmas presents for your unfortunate friends and ene- 
mies, and when I want to have a little bust as a reward for 
my labours, you begin to lecture me." 

"Well, it's for your own good. You know the doctor 
said you must'nt take anything that doesn't agree with you." 

"Yes, and if I followed that rule. I'd like to know where 
you'd be," said John. * * * 

— An eloquent politician was constantly interrupted by a 
man in the crowd, who kept on shouting out "Liar!" 

After about the twentieth repetition, the speaker paused 
and fixed his eye on his tormentor. 

"If the gentleman who persists in interrupting." he said 
"will be good enough to tell us his name, instead of merely 
shouting out his profession, I am sure we shall all be pleased 
to make his acquaintance." 

— An old colored preacher owned a mule which had an 
efficient pair of heels and a loud but unmusical voice. 

One Sunday morning, while the preacher was earnestly 
exhorting, the mule persisted in putting his head in at the 
window and braying loudly. 

The preacher finally said. "Breddern and sistern is dere 
one among you all who knows how to keep dat mule quiet?" 

"Pahson," replied a man, "if you all will jess tie a stone 
to dat mule's tail he sho will keep quiet." 

"Breddern and sistern," responded the preacher, "let him 

who is without sin tie de fust stone." 
* * * 

— There has just come to Honolulu the story of the maid 
who went to the lady of the house (the wife of a Mah Jongg 
fiend) and said she feared she would have to find another 
place. 

"But why?" her alarmed employer asked. 

"Because," the maid replied, "I fear your husband is los- 
ing his mind. I found him on his hands and knees in the 
living room, and when I asked him what he was doing, 
he said he was looking for the East Wind." 



— A Chicago man visiting London was invited to a ball 
where everybody except himself talked with an exceedingly 
broad "a." The accent was puzzling to his Chicago ears, 
but he did his best. 

He danced with the wife of his host. The latter spoke 
with an especially broad accent ; also she ran somewhat to 
flesh. When they had finished the round of the floor she 
was panting in a repressed and well-bred way. 

"Shall we try another whirl?" inquired the Chicago man. 

"Not now," she said, "I'm darnced out." 

"Oh no," said the American, gallantly; "not darn stout — 
just nice and plump, ma'am." 

* * * 

— When small Margaret entered the first grade, she found 
herself in a class where the foreign element was in the ma- 
joritv. Most of these children were dirty, and the teacher 
was, of course, glad to have one clean pupil. Wishing to 
impress this fact upon the class, she said one day to Mar- 
garet: "My! but I am glad to see you looking so nice and 
clean, Margaret." 

"Well," observed Margaret seriously, "you'd be clean, too, 
if you had my mamma to wash you." 

* * * 

— In one point at least, women score against men. The 
fair sex can don trousers (no matter what frights they 
may look) and walk the streets unmolested, but should a 
member of the sterner sex masquerade in petticoats, he 
would be haled to jail. 

— Son : "Dad, there's a friend of yours outside who hasn't 
seen you since the wedding. Shall I usher him into the re- 
ception room?" 

Father : "He isn't my friend. He's the man who intro- 
duced me to vour mother." 




going away 

Back East Low roundtrip fares 

Travel East over one of the three great Southern Pacific 
transcontinental highways. 

Take the scenic Sunset route through historic San Anto- 
nia and New Orleans. 

Or choose the American Canyon route via Lake Tahoe 
and the Great Salt Lake cut-off, through Ogden and Salt 
Lake City. 

Or go by way of the Shasta route through the Pacific 
Northwest and across the northern United States or Can- 
ada. 

You can go via one route, returning on another if you 
choose. 

Communicate with any Southern Pacific agent for cour- 
teous, accurate travel information. 

Southern Pacific 



05 Geary St. 



FERRY STATION 
Phone Sutter 4000 



Third St. Stntion 



Ink 5, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA AD\ ERTISER 



53 



The Pay As You Go Plan 

For the city's advancement and development the Market 
Street Railway purchase should be settled at mice and 
should have been settled long before this. Onr city can 
never have adequate, sufficient street car facilities until all 
of its existing lines are unified into a city-owned and oper- 
ated system. Unification of the three un-related systems 
should result in a great saving in time and money to the 
hundreds of thousands of people who ride daily on our 
street cars. Two separately owned street car systems on 
Market Street, our main thoroughfare, have been a definite 
detriment to business. It is a condition tha.t would not be 
tolerated in any other city of the size of San Francisco. 

The pay-as-you-go plan was written into our City Char- 
ter in 1920 for this very purpose of providing a ways and 
means for the City to improve its transportation facilities 
by the unification of the privately owned lines. It pro- 
vides a simple method by which the city can acquire the pri- 
vately owned street car lines by letting the earnings of the 
lines apply to the purchase price. The privately owned com- 
pany has consented to turn over its properties to 
the city looking to the earnings of the properties to pay the 
purchase price, thus making possible a unified city-owned, 
city-operated and city-wide car system which the people 
have twice demanded by overwhelming majorities at the 
polls. The people have signified their approval in regard 
to this plan of purchasing the United Railway system; it is 
time that McGregor's committee showed some action as an 
excuse for its ever having been appointed. 



An Appropriate Appointment 

M. H. de Young has been appointed by Mayor James 
Rolph, Jr., as a member of the San Francisco Park Com- 
mission, to succeed the late Adolph B. Spreckels. In view 
of the fact that Mr. de Young has done more for Golden 
Gate Park in an artistic and financial sense, than any other 
citizen, and has generally shown a liberal and public-spir- 
ited attitude towards the improvement and progress of San 
Francisco, the S. F. News Letter extends its heartiest con- 
gratulations not only to de Young, but also to our Mayor 
for the good sense demonstrated in his choice. The won- 
derful Museum in the Park, with its various annexes, will 
stand in the years to come, as a majestic monument to M. 
H. de Young and his good works, long after he is gathered 
to liis fore-fathers. 



Banks Show a Healthy Condition. 

Semi-annual statements of various banks throughout San 
Francisco demonstrate a most remarkable growth, and the 
banks which have published statements in this issue of the 
S. F. News Letter, in particular, show a conspicuously 
healthy and prosperous condition. Total assets of each are 
herewith given : 

Bank of Italy S.^- , ".5<>' i.405.3<> 

San Francisco Savings & Loan 93,198,226.96 

Hibernia Savings & Loan 80,808,318.2/ 

Humboldt Bank 26,649,599.65 

First Federal Trust Co 26,349,044.25 

Italian-American 21,497,763.8/ 

French-American 18,432,547.08 

—"Although 1 was late." said the new boarder. "1 found 
the landlady had saved for me the tenderest part of the 
chicken." 

"What was that?" said the old boarder, jealously. 

"Some of the gravy." 

Diminutive Scout (striving to do his good turn"): 
"May I accompany you across the road, madame?" 

Hear Old Soul:' '"Certainly, my little man. How long 
have you been waiting for someone to take you aero 



Good Service— Good Will 



T 



HIS company cherishes the good will 
of its customers and the public. 



Such good will is fostered by a general 
understanding of the company's problems 
and of its relations with the public. 

Your principal points of contact with the 
company are the service you get and the 
rates you pay. 

What the public wants:dn. the way of elec- 
tric power service is plenty of current, served 
without interruption at the lowest rates con- 
sistent with good service. 

California utilities are strictly regulated 
with respect to rates, financing and service 
by the public through its Railroad Com- 
mission. 

California enjoys the best service and the 
lower rates. That is why California has be- 
come a great industrial state. That is one 
reason why life in the city and on the farm 
has become so much more comfortable in 
California. 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 



PG- 




•PACIFIC SERVICE" 



54 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER July 5 1024 



GEORGE WILLS & SONS, Ltd. 

EXPORT AND IMPORT 
MERCHANTS 

560 Sacramento St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



LONDON, Head Office 

3 Chapel Street, Whitecross St. E. C. 



SHIPPING AND PRODUCE 

101 Leadenhall St. E. G. 



NEW YORK 

65 Madison Ave. 



lulv 5. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



120, 000 HeraldFamUies 
Spend $780,000 Every Day 

Reader-Ownership 
Adds 

Confidence 



Statistics given by 
San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce 




1§ The vast army of Herald 

readers buy with confidence 
from advertisers in their own 
paper. 

<JA|sure way to reach 

these buyers is through the adver- 
tising columns of the newspaper 
in which they believe. 

CflThe Illustrated Daily 

Herald — only six months old — is 
the second largest paper in the 
rich San Francisco territory. A 
ready response from its readers 
awaits the advertiser who uses 
its columns. 

•JPlace your advertising in 
this paper, where Reader-Own- 
ership is an asset of major value. 

<JYour sales will show a 
healthy and profitable growth. 



V 



SAN FRANCISCO 




"^l 



Herald 




= fr ^ d 



lOIMHU) VANOlRBILl Jl, ruUOiHEJt 



56 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 




FIRE, EARTHQUAKE, AUTOMOBILE, USE AND OCCUPANCY, RIOT AND CIVIL 
COMMOTION, EXPLOSION, PLATE GLASS, FIDELITY AND SURETY BONDS 

INSURANCE 
The London & Lancashire Insurance Co., Ltd. 

LONDON, ENGLAND 
Incorporated IS 61 

Orient Insurance Co. of Hartford, Conn. 

Incorporated 1867 



Law Union & Rock Insurance Co., Ltd. 

Of London — Founded 1806 

London £? Lancashire Indemnity Company of America 

Organized under the laws of the State o' New York — Incorporated January, 1915 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT: 332 Pine Street, San Francisco, Calif. 
GEO. ORMOND SMITH, Manager 



M^sSs®^gSSSsS^MSMs2^sXs®^sSsIsi3|! 



f£ 



slt n^FlREOFTWO C£% 



■■++■■ 



£s 



^nnton jKsfiunmre Ctfrpnrattnn 



Estahlished 1720 A. D. 
J. M. MENDELL, MANAGER 

+ + 



ilantjattan 3m $c Mmnt Jfttnunmr? (H0. 



J. M. MENDELL, VICE PRESIDENT 



++ 



PACIFIC COAST BRANCH, 369 Pine Street, San Francisco, Calif. 




ss^^^^MSrM^M^MSsTM:«s^sM:^is^ir^^M^^^K:»::H:>E'M^M 



lulv 



1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



57 







II!f!lB 



Heiimveh 

The little tea-rooms and the rainbow hats. 
The shops, the latest frocks, the newest 

song, 
The crush of motors when the play is out — 
for these I long. 

The rows of fairy lamps that gleam and 

lure 
In lines of globes that narrow softly down, 
The shaded pink light at some place for 

two — 

These are my town. 

The pointed satin toes, the silly heels, 
The heavy furs, the painted face above, 
The scent of lip-stick, rouge, of deep per- 
fume. 

Are things I love. 
A waiter's smirk, shrimp cocktails, lemon- 
ice, 
The clubs, the lobbies, cigarettes at tea, 
Gin in a silver flask — a rendezvous — 
These beckon me. 

The jazz notes in some famous cabaret, 
A laugh, as empty, meaningless, as 

foam — 
Indeed, these bits of tawdry frivol make 
My heart — my home. 
— Dorothy Dow, in Poetry. 



Death Valley 

It is a place of silence, strange and deep. 
The sun-scorched mountains near its 

sandy side 
Look down impassive at its death- 
like sleep. 
Under its skeleton plant the rattlers glide. 
Among its painted rocks the lizards 
creep. 
Above, in the hot glimmer of the sky, 

A flock of wild geese wing their 

falt'ring way. 
With weary pinions, and with echoing 
cry. 
Below, in desert sands that shine and 
shift, 
Lie the unburied dead; the heat 

waves drift 
O'er loneliness of graves: by torrid 
day 
Or torrid night, breathless and gleaming, 
lie 
Stretches of dun sands, where no 
shadows bide. 
And over all, its silence, strange and deep. 
— Eleanore F. Ross, in Out West Maga- 
zine. 



She kicked her slippers off and went to 
bed. 

— Margaret Larkin, in Poetry. 



Always When There Is Music 

Always when there is music, it is you 
Who comes between me and the sound of 
strings: 
The cloudy portals part to let you through. 
Troubled and strange with long remem- 
berings. 
Your nearness gathers ghostwise down the 
room, 
And through the pleading violins they 
play, 
There drifts the dim and delicate perfume 
That once was you, come dreamily 
astray. 

Behind what thin and shadowy doors you 

wait 
That such frail things as these should 

set you free! 
When all my need, like armies at a gate, 
Would storm in vain to bring you back 

to me; 
When in this hush of strings you draw 

more near 
Than any sound of music that I hear. 

— By David Morton, in Century Magazine. 




~)ac/l car ojborofQd 
hj/ rol/ab/e 
c/taufjeurs 
w/to ///oroudfy/y under- 
stand tfte/r jbus/ness 



This means that you can 
dispense with all wor- 
ries as to personal se- 
curity when using our 
cars. Our drivers are 
careful and they never 
violate your desires for 
safety. 




Phone Franklin 217 
162!) Tine Street 
San Francisco 



— "Is Mrs. Rise at home?" inquired 
Mrs. Chatters, standing- in the shadow 
of the doorway. 

"I don't know, ma'am," replied the 
servant; "I can't tell till I get a better 
look at you. If you've a wart on the 
side of your nose, she's out." 



— Visitor, admiringly : "What a pic- 
ture of innocence your little one is!" 
Mother: "I hadn't noticed it. Doro- 
thy, now what have you heen doing?" 



Nlkral 

These are the charming things that Nlkral 

did 
When she was wandering in the town 

alone: 
She helped a sniffing newsboy make hie 

rounds. 
Buried a murdered doll beneath a stone. 
And thanked a pump, with cheerful smile 

and wink. 
For offering her a drink. 

Having no blessed candle. Nlkral look 
Three cigarettes, and lit them one l« 
Stood them before the image (hat she 
loved, 

And knelt there, half in earnest, half in 

fun. 
Said all the Latin (bat she surely knew — 

"Amo. amaa, amat, amamus. amatls, 
amant; 

Dear lover, here is a faithless hearl for you. 
Praise God! Amen!" 

This pious service said. 



We are paying 



4% 



Ings Acoount§ 



A CONVENIENT LOCATION 
Sutter St. Jiint above Montgomery 

(10» Sutter S(.) 

SAX FRANCISCO 

Branches' """' ,;r " n < Avenue 

nrancnes. T|)ird st nn( , ,, a|o|i Avp 



We tire pnyinp 



4% 



Savings Accounts 



The French American Bank 

Commercial — Savings Member of th<* Federal Reserve System 

Statement :is of June 30, 1924 



RESOURCES 

!ash on bland and In Banks ? 1,775,841.86 

Coin and Currency in our vaults 
and Deposits with The Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank ami au- 
thorised depositaries. 

Loans and Discounts - i:.-U<8.900.94 

First Mortgage on Real Es- 
tate Mini Loans "ii appi 
collateral and '<■ Commercial 
institutions 

United States, Municipal and 

< 'th.-r Bonds . -- - - 8.1 II 
Bonds of the Government of. 
the United states. States and 
Cities and "ther carefully se- 
lect, d Bonds. 

Federal Reserve Bank S 

This the invest- 

ll m shares of the above 
institution. 

hank Premises 

An Income producing property 

..I" an estimated present value 

in exe«>s-; of amount at which 
i ted, 
safe Deposit Vaults 

Furniture and Fixtures 

These accounts represent fur- 
niture, fixtures and equip- 
ment of value which are car- 
ried at a nominal amount. 

Letters of Credit, etc 



TJAIULITIKS 

Due Depositors (16,2 16,098.26 

Secured by our resources. 
[..■iters ..r Credit etc . 206,651.28 

Bills Payable None 



•Due to stockholdi 

.apltal 11,260 

Surplus 100, 

Undivided 
Profits 



1 1179.791 55 



Total 118,432,547 ' 






505.809.88 









■The amount due stockholders is their guar- 
antee to depository and assures them of the 
continuance "f a conservative and secure 
policy on the pari of the management of 
nk. Muring the many years this Bank 
i des pored to give to 
it.-, deposit irs an efticient. courti a and un- 
derstanding service and welcomes new ac- 
counts. 



Total Resources jlS.Li.- " " 



LEON BnOQFERAZ 

President 

.1. M. DUPAS 

-I 'resident 

.1 A. BRRGKROT 

Vice-President 

on W. F. MUFFV 

taxing* Accounts Vlce-Pres. and Cashier 



\\ * are p«> hie 



4% 



ALPHl INSE BOFSQFFT 

Secretary 

.1. IR1LARRY 

Tit < "ashier 
.HAS L EBNER, JR. 
■ 
\\\ A. SANDERS 
ant t'ashier 



We «re imyinK 



4% 



>«» inc- \<-eount* 



58 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 



sMsSs^s ■-; m - ^MssMseM^M^M: 



TICKETS ISSUED TO ALL 
PARTS OF THE WORLD 

150 Offices in All Principal Places 
At Your Service 




Cruises Supreme 

Around the World 



By Specially Chartered New Cunard 
Cruising Liner 



rr 



>> 



TRANCONIA 

20,000 Tons Register 

Sailing Eastward from New York 
January 22. 1925 



MEDITERRANEAN 

By Specially Chartered White Star Liner 



"HOMERIC 



>> 



34.600 Tons Register 
Sailing Erom New York January 24. 1925 

Officially Appointed Passenger Agents 
British Empire Exhibition 

THOS. COOK & SON 

128 Sutter Street. San Francisco 




Cabin 

Steamers 
to EUROPE 



THE MODERN TREND IN TRAVEL- 

The comfortable, well appointed 
cabin liner with its moderate 
priced accommodations — 40% 
less than on express steamers — 
has opened a newera in European 
travel. People of moderate means, 
who have hesitated to visit the 
Old World because of expense, to- 
day are traveling by cabin liners. 

To meet the ever increasing de- 
mand for this economical and 
agreeable transatlantic service.the 
Royal Mail now has four famous 
"O" steamers, the Ohio, Orca, 
Orduna, Orbita— a luxurious 
cabin liner fleet. Each of these 
splendid ships is noted for its de- 
lightful atmosphere, spacious cab- 
ins, broad promenade decks and 
excellent cuisine. An unsurpassed 
service at moderate cost, with 
sailings from New York to 

Cherbourg Southampton Hamburg 
Plymouth Belfast Greenock 



DOYAT 

JL ^MAIL JU 



"The Comfort Route" 
SAILINGS TO EUROPE VIA PANAMA CANAL, AXD TOURS T< I 
INDIES, BERMUDA (WINTER) NORWAY CRUISES (SUMMER) 
'KRRANKAN CRUISES AND AROUND SOUTH AMERICA AND 
I'ORLD. 

THE ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COMPANY' 
5"0 Market Street, San Franrtnro, California. 



^MSMg 



MEMBERSHIP 

in the 

National Automobile Club 

FOR TEN DOLLARS A YEAR, 
GIVES YOU 

— FREE tow service whenever and wherever 
you need it. 

— FREE transportation of gasoline and oil to 

you any place on the road. 
— FREE services of a mechanic to make road 
repairs and adjustments to get you 
going. 

— FREE tire change service for women drivers 

and for men who are physically un- 
able to do the work. 

The stability oft/,,- NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE 
CI. IB is guaranteed by a number of the largest insurance 

companies in the world. 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA DIVISION 



July 5, 1924 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 59 

■ - ^ ^ ' •- - - 1 - ' - - ■■ - : ..... 




ABSOLUTE INDEMNITY 

FIRE INSURANCE, AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE 

Fire, Theft, Collision. Personal Liability. 

MARINE INSURANCE, CASUALTY INSURANCE 

Accident, Health, Bonds, Burglary, Employers' and General Liability. 
Assets over One Hundred and Seventy Million Dollars 

Royal Insurance Company, Limited 
Queen Insurance Company, of America 
Newark Fire Insurance Company, of Newark 
Royal Indemnity Company, of New York 

ROLL A V. WATT, Manager 

Pacific Coast Branch . Royal Insurance Building . San Francisco 





^SSSISMsiiXsSsMisXsDgMgassMSI^lXM^Xs^ 



I Investment Service 

M 

Awaits Your Call 

i]g) our list contains tin.' choice of Eastern and Western bond offer- 
ings, state, municipal, school, irrigation and Industrial securities, 
We will be pleased to counsel you In the Issuance, purchase, and 
handling of investment securities. 
Lei us solve your investment problems. 

Anglo ftnnbatt farts (Eontnatty 

San Francisco, One Sansome Strei 

Oakland, 709 S> ndlcate Building 

Los Angeles, 817-18 California Bank Building 

N'i-w York, Two Wall Street 




HEAD OFFICE MONTREAL 

LOW COST ANNUITIES 

On Single lives or Joint and Last Survivor. An Assured IN- 
COME guaranteed hi 50 years of successful operations and 
assets over (209,000,000, 

if interested return this coupon to 

l». M, JOST, Manager 
701-2 AIhhUu Commercial Bldg., San FraDctsco, Calif ornla. 





Age, last Birthday 



SsM2<^SM3r: ./KjCaSj: ^m^sM^m 





(Hit? iEagb, §>tar mh 




Iritis It inmiimma 



JttHuranrr Gkmjrattg Uimitrb, of Sonson. tnniano 

MORH THAN A IKMTKV (>l EXPERIENCE 
ASSETS EXCEED ONE HUNDRED MILLION DOLLARS 



WESTERN DEPARTMENT 
176 Weal raid, Chicago 



PREP S FAMES « CO., 1". S. Managers 
Street, New York 



PACIFIC ■'■AST DEPARTMENT 
Sansome St., San Fran. 



60 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 



Famous Warship To Go 

The Revenge, an old wooden battle- 
ship laid down in Pembroke Dockyards 
in 1855, will be towed to Appledore, 
North Devon, to be broken up. 

It has been in use as a training ship 
in the Clyde for many years. 

Carrying 91 guns, the Revenge was 
flagship of the Channel Fleet in the 
early sixties, and saw service in the 
Mediterranean. 

This old hulk will end her days with- 
in hail of the river down which Sir 
Richard Grenville sailed in her name- 
sake, more than 300 years ago. manned 
by "men of Bideford in Devon." 



Penny 900 Years Old 

A silver penny struck during the 
reign of Ethelred II, the Unready, 979- 
1016, at Sudbury, where at the time 
there was a Royal Mint, has been pre- 
sented to the borough by the town 
clerk, Mr. T. Miles Braithwaite. 

It passed into his possession several 
years ago, and he has ascertained on 
high authority that it is irenuine. 

The coin has been deposited in the 
borough technical institute. 



*Qminq Events Cast 
Their Shadows Before" 



Second 
Largest 

News- 




A Prophecy 



Advertising contracts signed 

now will insure you against 

higher rates as circulation 

grows. 




Famous Authoress In Stormy Scene 
Bath people so strongly resented an 
attempt to hold a meeting in the Guild- 
hall on behalf of a "fund for helping 
starving Germans" that the meeting 
had to be abandoned. 

The speakers made their escape 
through the cells of the adjoining po- 
lice court. 

Mme. Sarah Grand, the well-known 
authoress, who was Mavoress of Bath 



last year, trying to plead for starving 
children of whatever nationality, was 
met by the retort, "There are plenty 
of starving children in Bath." 

— "When I was shipwrecked, I came 
across a tribe of wild women who had 
no tongues." 

"Good gracious ! How could thev 
talk?" 

"They couldn't. That's what made 
'em wild." 



Over half a million depositors 

CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

Bank of Italy 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL TRUST 

HEAD OFFICE (SAN FRANCISCO) AND BRANCHES 

JUNE 28, 1924 

LIABILITIES 



RESOURC'KS 

First Mortgage 

Loans on Real 

Estate J121.506.667.31 

Other Loans and 

Discounts 



DEPOSITS- 

Savings J204.591.8S6.80 

Commercial ... P2.3S4.11S.91 



S3. 393. 119.45 $204,899,776.78 



United States, 

State. County 

and Mun Ici- 

pal Bonds and 
United S t a t es 

Certificates of 

I n d e btedness 

(actual value 

$63,3(12,379.97).. $09,995,970.56 
Other Bonds and 

Securities (ac- 

t u a 1 value 

$10,130,469.68).. 9.619,450.01 
Stock in Federal 
Reserve Bank 637.500.00 



Dividends Unpaid 

Discount Collected hut Not 

Earned 

Letters of Credit. Acceptances 

and Time Drafts 



$296,976,005/ 

1.101,407.' 

53.0x5.: 

1.027,835.. 



71 
70 

9 
49 
$299,158,334.19 



TOTAL U. S. AND 

OTHER S E- 

CURTIES 

Due from Fed- 

e r a 1 Reserve 

Bank $15,132,534.99 

Cash and Due 

from Other 

Banks 20.416.S09.04 



70,252,920.57 



TOTAL CASH 
AND DUE 
PROM BANKS. 35.549,344.03 

Banking Premises. Furniture, 
Fixtures and Safe Deposit 
Vaults (Eighty-six Banking 
Offices in Fifty-eight Cali- 
fornia cities ) 11,222.091! 94 



Other Real Estate Owned. 

Customers' Liability Under Let- 
ters of Credit and Acceptances 

Interest Earned — Uncollected... 

Employes' Pension Fund (actual 
value $131,318.97 standing on 
the Books at) 

Other Resources 



870,963.29 



1.027,835.49 
2,672,596.87 



1.00 
13.880.41 



CAPITAL PAID IN , 

SURPLUS 

Undivided Profits .. 
Interest Earned 
Collected 



$17 
5 
2 



.500,000 00 
000.000.00 
178.474.30 



TOTAL RESOURCES J326.509.405.36 



TOTAL LIABILITIES J326.509, 405.36 



All charge-offs, expenses and interest payable to end of half-year have been 
deducted In above statement 

CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CONDITION— STOCKHOLDERS AUXILIARY CORPORATION 

. (The Capital Stork of this Corporation is owned share for share bv the stock- 
holders of the Bank of Italy) 
June 2 8, 1024 
Resources 

Investment in Stocks and Bonds.. $3,710,904.16 
Real Estate and Other Invest- 



ments 3.220.088.24 

Bills and Accounts Receivable.. 2.040.606.14 

Cash on Hand and in Banks.... 379.249.34 

TOTAL RESOURCES 



Liabilities 

Bills and Accounts Payable 

CAPITAL. SURPLUS AND UN- 
DIVIDED PROFITS 8.855.710.32 



J495.137.56 



$9,350,847.88 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 



. $9.350.847.88 
$:i«.2oe.7.si.4ii 



CdllRIMiD CAPITAL. SlRPLl'S AND PROFIITS OP BOTH CORPORATIONS. 

(Including Interest earned by Bank of Italy but not collected) 

NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS, 528,363 
Savings Deposits made to and including July 10, 1924, will earn interest from 

July 1, 1924 



Tub 5, 1 ( >24 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



61 




— "Father, what is an idiom?" 

"An idiom, my boy, is a woman 

idiot." 

* * * 

— "Do you always leave a card when 
von call?" "No, sometimes I leave a 

pair of gloves or an umbrella." 

* * * 

— What kind of man gives his wife 
the first reading of the newspaper? — A 

blind man. 

* * * 

— Departing Guest: "Enjoyed our- 
selves? Oh, yes! What I'm upset about 
is leaving your hotel so soon after I've 

bought it." 

* * * 

— Miss Catt — Has Grace become 
friendly with her husband again? 

Miss Nipp — Yes. Instead of spend- 
ing money for a divorce, they have de- 
cided to buy a car. 

* * * 

— Tom : "I hear you can't meet your 
creditors. Jack." 

Jack: "Can't meet 'em! The trou- 
ble is I can't dodge 'em." 

* * * 

— 1st She — "I wonder why a girl 
can't catch a ball as easy as a man?" 

2nd Her — "I suppose it's because a 
man is so much bigger and easier to 

catch." 

* * * 

— Doctor: "Remember, if you give 
your husband anything to drink but 
hot water, it will kill him." 

Patient's Wife: "Oh, but. doctor, if 
I give him water, he'll kill me." 

* * * 

— Uncle: "Well, you young rascal, 
how many times have you been 
whacked at school today?" 

Tommy : "Dunno, uncle; I don't take 
any notice of what goes on behind m\ 

back." 

* * * 

— "You eat very little, Mr. Smith," 
said the maiden to the bashful lover 
who had been invited to dinner. 

"Yes," be replied. Then he saw a 
chance and, grasping his courage, said : 
"To sit next to yon. Miss Grace, is to 
lose one's appetitie." 

* * * 

—"Sorry to hear your husband has 
been drinking again. Mrs. Miggs. Of 
course, drunkenness is a disease. He 
ought to be treated by a physician." 

"Bless ye, 'e wouldn't mind that, 
sir! When my 'usband's 'ad a drop, V 
don't care 'oo treats 'im." 

* * * 

— Prof. Ruston — "Is pants singular 
or plural?" 

Pupil — "It" a man wears them, it's 
plural." 

Prof. Ruston — "And if no) 

Pupil- "It's singular." 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

Assets $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 446,024.41 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haieht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Porta I Ave. and UHoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4%) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 

Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Travelers Checks 

for those contemplating CANADIAN TOURS 



may be purchased at 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 



450 California Street 
Telephone Douglas 2783 



{Over 6C0 branches in Canada J 



PACIFIC GAS and ELECTRIC CO. 

oA California enterprise with a national reputation. 
Otmed by over 29,000 Oockholders 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 



GROWTH OF BUSINESS 

10 YEARS 

Year Gross Nel 

1914 $17,100,000 $8,187,000 

1915 18,778,000 9,573,000 
18,941,000 9,383,000 
20,119,000 8,514,000 
22,870,000 9,840,000 
26,310,000 10,061,000 
34,986,000 11,528,000 
37,510,000 13,231,000 
39,205,000 15,788,000 
39,972,000 16.478,000 



1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 

Increase 
9 years 



$22,872,000 $8,291,000 



In these ten years more than One Hun- 
dred Million Dollars of 'additional capi- 
tal has been inveSed in tlant additions 
or otherwise placed in the service of the 
public. 



Common Stock 
Dividend No. 34 

<sA regular quarterly dividend of JI2.00 per 
share upon the common capital stock of this 
company will be paid on July 15, 1924, to 
shareholders of record at the close of business 
lune xo. 1024. 

i . .r I- . YearEmled 4*os.En(leiJ 
Uteit taming* Dec 31J923 April30,)924 

$39,971,743 $14,751,173 
16.478.33Z 5.667,458 



Grots earnings . 
Net after taxes, etc. 
S orpins for common 

stock after prior charges 

and depreciation . 3,652.448 
Dmdeodat 8 

annual!? on all 

com moo onbtandtac 2,850,471 
Sarploi OTer 8 I 

dmdend .... 801.977 

Earned per share of com. $10.25 

(12 mot 



1.293,119 



950. 157 

342.962 
$3.63 

,) (4 mot J 

oAt present market price this Bod yields 
approximately 8'j 

Lifted on Hew York, San Francisco and 
Lot Angeles Stock Exchanges 

San Francisco, A. F. HOCKENBEAMER 
California I'ice-PraidentandTrmiitrer 



62 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5,1924 




J&lfour, #uti)rte & Company 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES, PORTLAND, OREGON — SEATTLE 
AND TACOMA, WASHINGTON — VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA 

MERCHANTS 

EXPORTERS and IMPORTERS 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

Insurance Agents and Average Adjusters 

AGENTS 
HARRISON DIRECT LINE — Regular freight service be- 
tween London, Liverpool, Glasgow and with Pacific ports 
via Panama Canal. 



AGENTS 

The American and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 
British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., Ltd. 
The Yang-Tsze Insurance Association, Ltd. 
North China Insurance Co., Ltd. 
Union Insurance Co. of Canton, Ltd. 
Queensland Insurance Co., Ltd. 
New Zealand Insurance Co., Ltd, 
Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Co. 



REPRESENTED BY 

Balfour, Williamson & Co. 
London, Liverpool, New York 



Williamson, Balfour & Co. 
Valparaiso, t 'hile 



^^^^^^^3 






Ifcmgknttg $c §>Ijangl)at$anktng Okrjmrattfln 



361 CALIFORNIA STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



FINANCE 
ORIENTAL IMPORT AND EXPORT BUSINESS 



SELL DRAFTS AND CABLE TRANSFERS ON 

HONGKONG, SHANGHAI, JAPAN, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, 

AND ALL OTHER ORIENTAL POINTS. 



Established over sixty (60) years 




HEAD OFFICE, HONGKONG 



July 5, 1924 \XI> CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



63 




CANADA 



with her untold natural resources a r waiting development 
invites you to assist in this great development 

HERE LIES YOUR OPPORTUNITY: 

OPPORTUNITY FOR THE HOMESEEKER 

Fertile land, very low in price, either irrigable or non-irrigable. THIRTY- 
FIVE YEARS TO PAY. Only 7 per cent down, free use of the land the 
first year. Record crops, good markets, good climate. 

INDUSTRIAL OPPORTUNITIES 

The development of Nature's gift to Canada, her minerals, forests, water- 
power, petroleum deposits, etc., offer to Capital wonderful opportunities, 
under a stable government, insuring- safety. 

THE DEVELOPMENT OF CANADA, the best customer of the United 
States, means prosperity for both, 

THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY maintain a Bureau of Informa- 
tion which is at your service, FREE. 

CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY 



Department Colonization and Development 



29U Monadnock Building 



San Francisco, California 



&J 



^M^M^M^M'^M^M^M^'M:.^ i S^3CsXs3C«M^3C3s3CsM^M^$Cs3£s3C^3Cs# 






s*h *«jMLweias % 




(£alifornfOu>tocrti sc r. 



has been established since 1856. It is a 
journal which appeals to the elite, socially 
and mentally; its comments and criticisms 
are always fearless and independent. You 
will enjoy its regular weekly visits. 



The subscription price is $5.00 per year. 
We shall be pleased to have you fill in the 
following blank form and mail it to the 
office. 



.1924 




Please send the S. F. News Letter to my address for which I enclose five dollars for 
one year's subscription. 



«clsMSMsMslS 




64 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



lv 5, 1«>24 



GOING SOME 

(Written for The Times of Cuba) 

There was a man in our town 

Whom youth had long deserted, 
He thought he'd better go and have 

A monkey-gland inserted. 
In course of time he married. 

As folks have done before, 
And he rejoiced to hear the stork 

A-knocking at his door. 
He waited 'round expectantly. 

And said, "Pray Doctor, tell 
The latest news — I long to know 

If all is going well !" 
The doctor frowned, and mopped his brow 

And said, " 'Tis very queer. 
Your offspring's swinging round and round 

Upon the chandelier!" 

— Jane Thomas. 



— Daisy: "So you rejected that young fireman?" 

Minnie: "Yes. Do you suppose I'd marry a man who 
might leave me at any hour of the twenty-four to dance 
attendance on some other flame?" 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. Russ Building, 235 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, 
Calif. Telephone Douglas C853. Entered at San Francisco, Calif., Post 
Office as second-class matter. 

London Office : Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year. $6.00 ; Canada, one year. $6.00. 

P. G. & E. Will Sell Stock ~ 

The Railroad Commission has authorized the Pacific Gas 
& Electric Company to sell $5,000,000 par value of its com- 
mon stock at not less than $92 a share. The purpose of this 
financing is to provide funds for part payment of the cost of 
extensions, additions, betterments and improvements to the 
corporation's properties and to those of the Mt. Shasta 
Power Corporation, now operated by the local company. 

The authorized capital stock of this company totals $160,- 
000,000, divided into $79,900,000 of first preferred stock. 
$100,000 of original preferred stock and $80,000,000 of com- 
mon stock. 

A. I'". Hockenbeamer of the Pacific Gas & Electric Co.. 
thinks that the situation is a fortunate one when, despite 
the statewide water shortage and its acute effects upon the 
hydroelectric companies, that he is able to report an in- 
crease of more than $500,000 in the operating gross for May. 
an increase of $66,806 in the net earnings for the same per- 
iod, and also that the month's quota of the 8 per cent com- 
mon stock dividend was earned with $63,410 to spare. 



e eye never learns any- — "I don't know where he gets all his faults from. I'm 
sure it's not from me." 
'A es, and it's curious that the bridge of the nose is never 
crossed, and the roof of the mouth never repaired." 



— "It's funny that the pupil of th 
thing 



C II 3 1IUI II Ulll lilt.. 

No, vou're right, Hannah. You haven't lost any oi 
yours." 



■1'j^'ji Aj_:. _ ...... 



One Hundred and Thirteenth Half Yearly Report 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 



(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 



COMMERCIAL 



One of the Oldest Hanks In California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 



Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



JUNE 30th, 1924 

Assets — 

United States Bonds and Notes, State, Municipal and Other Bonds and 

Securities (toial value $25,184,661.75) standing on books at $23,156,351.53 

Loans on Real Estate, secured by first mortgages 60,512,097.36 

Loans on Bonds and Stocks and other Securities 1,381,051.01 

Bank Buildings and Lots, main and branch offices (value $1,550,000.00), 

standing on books at 1.00 

Other Real Estate (value $50,000.00), standing on books at 100 

Employees' Pension Fund (value ?446,024.41) standing on books at 1.00 

Cash on hand and checks on Federal Reserve and other banks 8,148,724.06 

Total $93,198,226.96 

Liabilities — 

Due Depositors $89,298,226.96 

Capital Stock actually paid up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,900,000.00 

Total $93,198,226.96 

GEO. TOURNY, President A. H. MULLER, Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 30th day of June, 1924. 

[SEAL] CHAS. F. DUISENBERG, Notary Public. 

A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (434) per cent per 
annum was declared, Interest COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED 

QUARTERLY, 

AND WHICH MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 

Deposits made on or before July 10th, 1924, will earn interest from July 1st, 1924. 



July 5, 1924 AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 65 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
of San Francisco 

California's Oldest National Bank 

Capital and Surplus $4,500,000.00 

Offers a complete service to those requiring hanking" facilities in San Francisco and on 

the Pacific Coast. 

FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY 

Capital and Surplus $1,925,000.00 

A Savings Bank and Trust Company. Acts as Executor, Administrator, Guardian and 

in any other trust capacity. 

AFFILIATED INSTITUTIONS. POST AND MONTGOMERY STREETS 

COMBINED DEPOSITS OF BOTH BANKS, JUNE 30, 1924— $46,697,029.45 








;'■.; 



THE SUN NEVER SETS ON 

NORTH BRITISH 

AGENCIES 



-•++.. 



Service Anywhere in the World 



North British and Mercantile Ins. Co., Ltd. 

244 Pine Street PACIFIC DIPT. San Francisco 









fSM^S«M^M>~ *ISICsSsSs:: SSS^ 



66 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 5, 1924 



CMHM^MSSMS' ■ ■ iCSMSMSr i i U ■ ^SM^IKMSMSMS! 



ROUND THE WORLD 

via SOUTH SEA ISLES 



"A voyage on the Sun-kissed sea 
And just what von would have it he ! ' ' 



' ' The way that every one would go 
If every one did only know!" 



$1200 First Class First Class $1200 



San Francisco, Honolulu, Samoa (South 
Sea Isles), Sydney, Australia, Java, 
Singapore, Penang, Colombo, Suez, Port 
Said, Alexandria, Naples, Genoa, Mar- 
seilles. (London via rail $35 extra), New 
York and choice of railroads across the 
United States (stop-overs). 



( )ceanic S. S. Co.'s steamers, San Fran- 
cisco to Sydney: trans-shipping at Syd- 
ney to favorite Java lines to Singapore; 
from Singapore splendid U. S. Govern- 
ment-built steamers of the Dollar Line 
to Marseilles or New York (New York 
to San Francisco via Panama Canal 
$140 extra). Standard service through- 
out. 



Tour may start with following: 

Oceanic Steamship Company's sailings: Sierra, July 8; 
Sonoma, July 29; Ventura. August 26; Sierra. September 
16; Sonoma. October 7; Ventura, October 28; Sierra, 
November IS; Sonoma, December 9 and sailings every 
three weeks. Excursion trips in Australia (lowest fares 
in the world i, to charming resorts in the Blue moun- 
tains, and to beaches (safe for children); excursions 
through Java, "the Garden of the East," geysers and 
volcanoes, temples rivalling India, and on through the 
Malay Peninsula (Road to Mandalay), Botanic Gardens. 
Ceylon, P^.eypt, Italy, the Riviera, and through Europe 
by train, visiting Paris and London. Write for further 
information and itinerary. 



Sydney, Australia 
and Return 

Via Hawaii, Samoa (South Sea Isles) 
$565.00 First Class; Good 12 Months 



HONOLULU 
$220 

First Class Round Trip 



Sailings to HAWAII, SAMOA and AUSTRALIA 

Every Three Weeks 

BOOK NOW! 

Oceanic Steamship Co. 



2 Pine Street 



San Francisco, Calif. 



Phone Douglas 5600 



«MScMssS^-M> ... -^gg^sl^ 



World Tours 

— easy, comfortable, economical — 
on palatial liners 

The lure of foreign lands is the charm of strange people, unique 
customs and sights that are wholly different from those we know. 

And the seven magnificent world liners of the Dollar Steamship 
Line sailing on fortnightly schedules, make the world easy to 
see and enjoy. 

They circle the globe in 110 days, stopping at each of their 21 
ports of call long enough to permit short visits to the interior. 

Or you may arrange in advance to stopover at any port or ports 
for two weeks, four weeks or longer, continuing on another Dollar 
liner exactlv like the one on which you started. 





21 World Ports 

SAN FRANCISCO 

HONOLULU 

KOBE 

SHANCHAI 

HONG KONG 

MANILA 

SINGAPORE 

PENANG 

COLOMBO 

SUEZ 

PORT SAID 

ALEXANDRIA 

NAPLES 

GENOA 

MARSEILLES 

BOSTON 

NEW YORK 

HAVANA 

COLON 

BALBOA 

LOS ANGELES 



These world liners are luxurious in their accom- 
modations: They have a homelike atmosphere. You 
live in rare comfort. The service is courteous and 
attentive. 

And the fares are reasonable beyond your expec- 
tations both for the world trip and for transporta- 
tion between ports of call. 

Ask us for complete information. 

DOLLAR 

STEAMSHIP LINE 

HV(iH MA< KKXZIK, <;. n. Ptas. Agent 
311 California St., San Prmrlifnh 



ms^ ^Tia 



I I :j , •■ "■ i ■ ■ ■ 

&*3 ^% 



P 7or we loncj tour 
^-s or the short one- 

$ CASO LINE 

^MOTOR OILS 



<3 








July 12, 1924 



Price 35 Cents 



Vallejo-San Francisco Boats 

Monticello Steamship Co. 

Fast steamers giving- frequent service between Vallejo and San Francisco 
every day of the year. Dining Room, Barber, Bootblack, News Service. — 
Automobiles, Passengers and Freight carried on all trips. 



:«Asiai 




llllllllfli 






L«SWiyjJ. "jiii • i i n t : j t , >| 

B B I I I I I I I I I I 



Close connections at Vallejo with San Francisco, Napa & Calistoga Elec- 
tric Railway for Napa, St. Helena, Yountville, Calistoga and Lake County 
resorts. 

Monticello Steamship Co. 

San Francisco Terminal: North End of Ferry Building 
Phone Sutter 371 

Vallejo Terminal: South Georgia Street Dock 
Phone Vallejo 14 



Auto Parking Station at Vallejo Terminal, 25c Per Day 



Sixty -Ninth Year 




E*Lbll*hcd July ZO. 1636 

t 0i FJJ«&^ 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

Carquinez Straits Edition 




VOL. CV 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.. SATURDAY, JULY 12, 1924 



No. 2 







- in 








jHOySSu 


... . 
: 




stli 




wEam- 1 






■ • ' ■ 





Vallejo, 1852 State Capitol of California 







^ «s|4±- 




Emerson Photo 



AERO VIEW, LOOKING EAST 



Mare Island Navy Yard in Fore- 
ground 



City of Vallejo in Background 



Page Two 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 







ft 



SOME NEW PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN VALLEJO, CAL. 
No. 1 — Grant School No. 4 — Charles F. Curry School 



No. 2— Vallejo High School 
No. 3— Bay Terrace School 



No. 5 — McKinley School 
No. 6 — Roosevelt School 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Three 



Vallejo Water Supply and Fire Protection 



By ARTHUR H. DRAUGHON, Mayor 




ARTHUR H. DRAtlfiHON 



VALLEJO'S domestic 
water supply con- 
sists of two lakes, 
tnown as Wild Horse stor- 
age reservoirs, located 
25 miles north of Vallejo 
in the County of Napa. 
Thev have an elevation 
of 1200 and 1380 feet re- 
spectively, and a storage 
capacity of approximate- 
ly one billion gallons, 
which capacity is aug- 
mented and received 
from water sheds of a 
high elevation and from 
a natural rain fall. 

Water is released from 
;hese lakes over a natural 
aeration surface and fall, 
and carried to the distributing reservoirs, located about 
three miles from the City of Vallejo, with an elevation of 
216 feet above city base, and it is admittedly one of the 
purest and best domestic water systems in the state of 
California, together with an auxiliary water supply gen- 
erated from the Suscol wells, with a capacity of approxi- 
mately one and one-half million gallons that is carried to 
the main line supply through a pipe system, and is con- 
stantly analyzed for detection of any impurities or 
alkalies. 

Furthermore, the City of Vallejo at the present time 
has purchased and acquired approximately 3000 acres of 
the Scally ranch, located in what is known as Gordon 
Valley, and which project is known as the Gordon Valley 
water project, which is now in the process of construction 
and when completed will be another source of supply equal 
to a constant delivery into the City of Vallejo of approxi- 
mately three million gallons per day, which will also be a 
water storage of the same class as to purity and rain 
water as the Wild Horse project. 

These waters are and will be delivered to the present 
reservoirs and others will probably be constructed with 
aeration and purification carried out in detail as is the 
present system, and this pure water, no doubt, contributes 
to the health, wealth and well being of the community as 
does the excellent and temperate climate, which is well 
known throughout the state of California. 



When the new water project is completed and in opera- 
tion Vallejo will have one of the best and most commodi- 
ous and pure water sources of any city of its size on the 
western coast, and is in close proximity to other sources 
that, when necessity requires, it can be economically 
acquired and developed. 

The waters from the distributing reservoirs of the 
City of Vallejo are delivered and distributed throughout 
the city's water mains at a pressure of approximately 65 
pounds, being sufficient pressure for fire hose and appara- 
tus for efficient protection and immediate connection to 
the hydrants off of the main distributing lines. 

Vallejo's fire department is manned and operated by 
51 firemen, properly organized and trained to operate fire 
equipment and to handle apparatus that is modern in 
every respect. At the present time the extensions are 
being installed on the principal business streets of a ten- 
inch water main with three hydrant facilities to each 
block, directly off the principal lines and initial pressures. 

Vallejo has at the present time governing ordinances 
and fire districts regulated by ordinances and providing 
the protection for class "A" buildings against the con- 
struction of any buildings that would tend to increase 
the fire hazard within certain limits, and the City of 
Vallejo is at the present time contemplating a salt water 
distribution system from the salt water channel from 
Mare Island Straits to further augment the facilities in 
case of fires, in addition to the very adequate system that 
they now have in connection with the fresh water supply. 
Steps are now being taken to extend the corporate limits 
of the city, and when this is done, additional fire appara- 
tus and firemen will be stationed in the annexed areas. 

All of the water systems that Vallejo now uses and 
has under construction are municipally owned and con- 
trolled. 



A stranger journeying to a dale in Yorkshire pro- 
ceeded at the railway station to engage a seat in the horse 
vehicle plying to his destination. 

Asked if he required a first, second, or third class 
ticket, he took a first class one, though he was not a little 
mystified by the request. 

However, after a five-mile run on the level, the driver 
pulled up at the foot of a tremendously long, steep hill. 

"First class passengers," he directed, "sit still ; second 
class, get out and walk; third class, get out and push." 




WESTERN DIE CASTING COMPANY 
A New and Growing Industry in Vallejo, Cal. 



Page Four 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 




No. 1 — Vallejo Lodge No. 559, B. 

P. 0. Elks. 
No. 2 — Collins Apartments. 
No. 3— Vallejo General Hospital. 



No. 4 — Redmen's Hall, Georgia St., 
Vallejo. 

No. 5— Pacific Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Five 



Commercial and Industrial Advantages 

of Vallejo 

By C. S. STANWORTH, Secretary Chamber of Commerce, Vallejo 



WHEN the commercial and industrial advantages of 
one section of a locality are described, a feeling of 
opposition is aroused in the minds of some of the 
citizens of other sections, as if their interests would be 
unfavorably affected by the development of other sec- 
tions. The roots of a tree might as well object to the 
growth of the branches. 

We see on the other side of the Pacific Ocean in India, 
China and Japan, large masses of population requiring 
food and clothing supplies ; in Australia and New Zealand, 
Anglo-Saxon communities emerging from the colonial 
state, and requiring manufacturers and machinery, and 
to supply these various needs it is no wild flight of imagi- 
nation to foresee a growth in commerce across the Pacific 
Ocean equalling the present commerce from our Atlantic 
Coast. 

How is the Atlantic Coast commerce being handled? 
From Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Norfolk, 
Savannah, New Orleans, Galveston and Port Arthur; 
ships are going and coming laden with commerce, and to 
handle this shipping these ports have over one million 
lineal feet of ocean shipping wharfage with warehouses 
and railroad facilities. 

What provision has the Pacific Coast made for hand- 
ling an equal commercial tonnage? Our ports are few. 
They comprise San Diego, Los Angeles, San Francisco 
Bay, Portland and Columbia River, the Puget Sound ports, 
and in all these ports we have built only 190,000 lineal feet 
of ocean wharfage. Railroad communications with the 
entire United States are necessary and the Sierra Nevada 
Mountains present a barrier that places an economic han- 
dicap on some of our Pacific ports. San Francisco Bay is 
more accessible to rail communication than any other 
section of the Pacific Coast, and the Golden Gate will be 
the passage way for a large percentage of this ocean 
commerce. 

Every foot of water front of San Francisco Bay, San 
Pablo Bay, the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers that 
can be made accessible to ocean shipping with railroad 
connections will be required to supply San Francisco*s 
quota of lineal feet of ocean shipping wharfage. San 
Francisco city at the end of a mountainous peninsula, dif- 
ficult of access by railroads, became the financial center 
and clearing house for commerce, due to the exigencies 
attending the production of gold, and her position both 
as a financial and shipping center is too firmly established 
to be threatened by developments in other portions of the 
bay. This is plainly shown in the commercial development 
of Oakland, due to more favorable railroad facilities. 

The momentum of Oakland's development will lead to 
the early extension of wharves along the east shore of 
San Francisco Bay, and the failure of the navy depart- 
ment to secure the water front of Alameda for non-com- 
mercial enterprises, will quicken this development. The 
Contra Costa shores of San Pablo Bay and Carquinez 
Strait have made vast strides in handling ocean commerce. 

The Solano shores of Carquinez Strait present eco- 
nomic advantages due to rail and highway connections. 
river traffic in light barges, that are not possessed by any 
other section of the San Francisco metropolitan area. 
The strong attraction of San Francisco and Oakland, due 
to San Francisco being the financial and shipping center, 
have kept back the development of the Vallejo-Benicia 



section, and with them has also retarded the growth of 
Sacramento. 

The period of rivalry between various localities of 
central California is closing, due to the rapid increase in 
population of the state, the growth of commerce across 
the Pacific and Californians, Inc. is a marked instance 
of the broader view that embraces the development of 
California as a harmonious whole, each section contribut- 
ing the part it is best fitted for in the general welfare and 
growth of our California. 

Vallejo, from her economic situation, both in regard to 
ocean shipping, to ease of communication with the rest of 
the United States, is bound to become an important unit 
in the development of Central California, and Benicia for 
the same reasons will expand until the two cities merge 
their corporate identities in one large city of Benicia- 
Vallejo. 



Helen was at her first party. When refreshments were 
served she refused a second helping of ice cream with a 
polite "No, thanks," although she looked wistful. 

"Do have some more, dear," said the hostess. 

"Mother told me to say 'No, thank you,' " the little girl 
explained, "but I don't think she knew how small the 
dishes were going to be." 




First National Bank 
Vallejo, Cal. 



Page Six 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 



The Naval Base Controversy 



Bv CAPT. LEONARD M. COX 



THE long drawn out controversy over the establish- 
ment of an additional docking and supply depot on 
San Francisco Bay has at last received a fair and 
exhaustive consideration by the highest authorized ap- 
propriating body — and has been definitely decided in the 
negative. 

At leasl the articulate minority, possibly even a 
numerical majority, of the citizens of the lower bay 
region are disappointed. They wanted the additional 
establishment and they wanted it at Alameda. It would 
seem, too, that a majority of naval officers, admittedly 
the best judges of military requirements, also desired the 
Alameda establishment. Both classes of Alameda ad- 



of peace, — more than that was not contemplated by either 
side. This, however, was purely a matter of opinion and 
in no way accounts for the stubborn opposition which these 
officers maintained throughout the controversy. As there 
seems to be some misunderstanding concerning the 
grounds of this opposition in the minds of lower bay citi- 
zens, a brief exposition may not be amiss. 

The San Francisco naval base is, and will always be, 
the entire San Francisco Bay area, with its extensive har- 
bor and its vast contributing back country. The question 
at issue was the location within that area of one of the 
adjuncts to a naval base, — a docking and supply depot 
adequate for peace purposes and capable of expansion 




Looking West Towards Mare Island Navy Yard Sea Wall. 
City of Vallejo in Immediate Foreground 



Emerson Photo. 



vocates have, during the course of the controversy, been 
charged with shaping their convictions to their personal 
or professional interests. In this respect their fate differs 
in no way from that of those who opposed Alameda. 
These charges are without foundation. Unquestionably, 
the advocates as well as the opponents of the Alameda 
project were inspired solely by a desire to achieve what 
each thought to be for the best interests of the navy and 
the country. 

Proponents of the new establishment argued military 
needs. Opponents argued far greater military needs for 
the fleet afloat and the wisdom of expending such funds 
as could be obtained upon those greater needs, retaining 
in use existing home base facilities, even though such use 
might be attended by some inconvenience. The committee 
weighed the evidence presented and, taking into con- 
sideration the fact that existing home base facilities could 
be supplemented at small cost whenever necessary, ar- 
rived at its decision in accordance with sound business 
principles. 

The naval officers who opposed Alameda were con- 
vinced that the existing plant at Mare Island could, with 
the addition of certain docking facilities on the deep 
water at the south end of the island, be made adequate 
for all naval need of the San Francisco base during times 



throughout the entire base harbor during war emergency. 
Much of confusion will be avoided by keeping in mind the 
fact that, no matter where the dock and supply yard may 
be located, the base, with its lower bay anchorage grounds, 
its district headquarters for operation, communication 
and control, its vast commercial facilities and supplies, its 
facilities for recreation, will always be San Francisco Bay 
proper. 

With a clear understanding of the distinction between 
the terms base and dock yard, let us, before proceeding to 
a discussion of the opposition to Alameda, review the con- 
ditions obtaining when the Alameda project was first pro- 
posed, and the changes which have transpired since that 
time. When the so-called Helm board recommended the 
establishment of an additional dock yard on the lower bay 
we had, with the 1916 building program well under way, 
the largest navy in the world. While there are those who 
doubt its wisdom from the economic standpoint, it is at 
least possible that the Alameda project might have been 
justified as of that time and under those conditions. 

Conditions have changed since the date of the Helm 
board report. The limitation of armament conference, 
initiated in 1921, resulted in definite agreements which 
became effective in 1923. Our fleet today is relatively 
small as compared to our fleet existing or prospective in 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Seven 



1916. As a corollary, our need for docking facilities has 
been reduced. 

The popular conception of the limitation agreements 
is that the contracting parties should not exceed the fixed 
ratios of naval strength. A little consideration will demon- 
strate the fact that refraining from exceeding the ratios 
is only half the obligation. 

Aside from a natural wish to relieve their respective 
peoples from the burden of taxes involved in the ruinous 
race for naval supremacy, the nations participating in the 
limitation of armaments conference were inspired by a 
lofty ambition to promote peace. 

Just as surely as war is invited by an overwhelming 
supremacy in naval strength on the part of one power, so 
surely will abnormal weakness on the part of one (par- 
ticularly if that one be possessed of comparative wealth) 
bring about the same jeopardy. From this it follows that, 
even if regard for our own safety does not afford sufficient 
motive, our obligation to maintain our fleet up to the 
agreement ratio is just as great — to the cause of world 
peace — as our obligation to avoid exceeding that ratio. 

The fleet, measured by contemporary standards as to 
materiel, adequate and trained personnel, and advanced 
bases, is not now of treaty strength. 

This condition should cause no undue alarm at this 
time, but we should realize it and notify our fellow coven- 
anters that we intend to remedy it. The condition is not 
the fault of the administration. It is not due to ignorance 
or negligence on the part of the navy department or of 
naval officers. It is the natural result of the post-war 
psychology of economy which obtains throughout the 
entire civilized world today. The people are tired of wars, 
tired of talk of wars, and preparation for wars. They are 
burdened with taxes and are going through a period of 
business uncertainty. The temper of the people is re- 
flected in the attitude of their representatives in congress. 
Requests for appropriations, particularly appropria- 
tions for military objects, are scrutinized with extreme 
care by congress, and it very properly demands assurance 
that projects are absolutely necessary before granting 
such requests. Congress and the people expected substan- 
tial economies from the limitation agreements, — not 
renewed requests for large appropriations for military 
purposes. 

In order to convey some idea of what is required to 
bring our navy up to treaty strength ratio, — it may be 
said — and this should be taken as merely an intelligent 
estimate by a layman — that the following constitutes the 
minimum of needs: 

First: Modernization of battleships. Increasing range 
of guns to that possessed by other contracting nations; 
providing torpedo protection comparable to that installed 
or planned to install on battleships of other nations ; se- 
curing greatest speed and greatest cruising economy pos- 
sible with present design. Rough estimate of cost, S30,- 
000,000. 

Second: Additional 10,000-ton cruisers. The number 
of light cruisers was not limited by the agreement. It is 
to be hoped that a second conference will include this 
class of vessels; in the meantime, in order to balance the 
fleet and maintain the contemplated parity, as well as to 
provide a satisfactory (to us) basis for future limitation 
negotiations, we need at least sixteen such cruisers in 
addition to the ten now available or provided for. Approxi- 
mate cost, §180,000,000. 

Third: Adequate submarine force. So far as long 
radius, cruising type submarines are concerned, our exist- 
ing strength is virtually nothing. It would probably re- 
quire some 850.000,000 to conduct the necessary design 
research and provide a suitable number of craft of this 
type. 

Fourth: Air craft. We are certainly behind France 
and England, possibly behind Japan. §50,000,000 would 
not be too great a sum for this object. 



Fifth: Hawaiian base. Possibly as much as §25,000,- 
000 is required to provide anchorage ground for the 
mobilization of our fleet in the event of war in the Pacific 
together with necessary supply and fueling facilities. 

Besides the needs listed above there are certain needs 
which can only be estimated by the department, such as 
adequate personnel to man the fleet at 100 per cent war 
complement and adequate funds for keeping the fleet at 
sea and training the personnel in gunnery. 

We are now in position to weigh the motives and argu- 
ments of those who opposed Alameda. 

Granting the difficulty of securing funds for military 
objects under existing circumstances, granting the need 
of some §400,000,000 (not all at once, of course — the de- 
partment's request for §110,000,000 is quite sufficient for 
starting the program) to bring the fleet to ratio strength, 
granting the practicability of providing such additional 
docking and supply facilities as are -required for peace 
uses at Mare Island (and the printed record of the recent 
hearings of the house naval committee is available to all), 
— granting these hypotheses, which course should we 
pursue? Should we concentrate our efforts toward per- 
suading congress to authorize a new shore establishment 
on our unthreatened continental coast? Or should we do 
the best we can with existing home facilities and go after 
the things which are absolutely essential? 

As ar as Mare Island is concerned, her real friends 
are not seeking appropriations for expansion. They main- 
tain that docking and supply facilities can be provided at 
the south end of the island, but whether they are ever 
so provided or not is a matter wholly within the province 
of the department and its advisors. 

There exists no governing engineering obstacle to the 
construction of docks at the south end of Mare Island 
and the maintenance of safe and convenient access 
thereto, except the so-called Pinole Shoal through San 
Pablo Bay. This obstacle, like the rumor of Mark Twain's 
death, has been greatly exaggerated. That there is no 
ssrious problem in Pinole Shoal from the engineering 
standpoint, that no governing consideration should be 
given it from the economic standpoint, must be evident 
to anyone who will take the trouble to read the record of 
the recent hearings. 



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SPECIALISTS — Extractions: Crowns: Self Cleansing Bridges: Porce- 
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Page Eight 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 




Panoramic View of Mare Island Navy Yard and Harbor 




Panoramic View of Vallejo and Mare Island Navy Yard. 




Panoramic View of Vallejo 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Nine 






Phoioe Br J. C. PARSONS. Civil Engineer 
V.llr. 

CopyriEhted 



Page Ten 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 



Navy Yard cAssociation of 
cTWare Island 



By E. D. WICHELS, Secretary 




E. D. WICHELS 

Secretary Navy Yard Assocfation 

of Mare Island 



THE Navy Yard Association 
of Mare Island, organized 
about two years ago and 
numbering over eighty per cent 
of the three thousand employes 
in its membership, was formed 
for the purpose of promoting the 
welfare of the Mare Island em- 
ployes as a whole, on such mat- 
ters as wages, working condi- 
tions, retirement legislation, 
additional work for the yard, etc. 
Matters affecting individuals, or 
individual trades or particular 
shop conditions, are handled by 
the respective trade unions, with 
whom no conflict is intended. The 
Association is particularly inter- 
ested in the future of the navy yard, and in maintaining 
the esprit de corps of Mare Island — which has become a 
by-word in the naval service and elsewhere. The employes 
maintain their own relief association, providing loan, sick 
and death benefits; maintain their own cafeteria and 
lunch system; and for years maintained their own ferry 
system; they established national records in the various 
Liberty Loan campaigns and in the construction of all 
types of naval vessels against the stiffest competition. 
This spirit finds expression in shop orchestras and sea- 
sonal athletic events between various departments; and 
the co-operation that exists between the officers and em- 
ployes has even brought forth commendation on the floor 
of congress. 

During its existence the association has interested 
itself in many meritorious activities, the major ones being 
cited : it inaugurated a precedent in navy department his- 
tory by selecting a naval officer, a department head at 
Mare Island, to represent them before the wage board of 
review in Washington, with marked success in having cer- 
tain principles of law more clearly interpreted; it took a 
leading part in a ferry rate increase hearing before the 
railroad commission, and in effecting a compromise with 
the ferry owners ; and recently conducted what is perhaps 
the largest contribution ever made by employes in the 
yard toward a fund for pushing improved retirement leg- 
islation in the present congress. 

It has made an extensive survey of yard and shop 
capacities, showing what the yard is doing and what it is 
capable of doing. It has and is making every effort to 
bring to Mare Island the marine work of other govern- 
ment departments, in order that a normal, non-fluctuat- 
ing force of men may be kept employed. 

The association has won the complete confidence of our 
congressional representatives at Washington, who rely 
upon it to a great extent for pertinent information within 
the scope of the association to furnish. Representing, as 
it does, practically all the employes of the navy yard, 
through an executive committee of seventeen employes, it 
is of untold assistance in passing upon matters brought 
up by the employes for communication to their superiors 
or to their congressional representatives ; these represen- 
tatives are often confused and misled by numerous 
requests from a particular unit, all perhaps advocating 
the same thing but in a most conflicting manner. Passing 
upon the merits of such requests and collaborating them 



is one of the aims of this association, and works to the 
benefit of both the employes and the legislators. 

Its assistance during wage hearings is to aid in obtain- 
ing comparable wage data, labor statistics and general 
information pertaining to the wage question in its 
entirety, and to assist individual crafts to prepare their 
data. During the present retirement hearings in congress 
it has maintained a personal representative in Washing- 
ton and has conducted a campaign of publicity which has 
been very successful. 

Elections are held annually, and membership meetings 
quarterly. The executive committee of seventeen em- 
ployes meets weekly and keeps in constant touch with all 
matters pertaining to the welfare of the yard personnel. 
The association strives at all times to perpetuate the 
striking example of complete co-operation existing be- 
tween employer and employe at this yard, and the almost 
unparalleled morale which has become local tradition. 

Its present officers are: N. E. Hanson, president; W. A. 
Barstow, vice-president; E. D. Wichels, secretary, and 
Wm. A. Herbert, treasurer. 



Phone Vallejo 919-W 
JAS. B. H. TURNER, Prop. 



McMillan 
studio 

LEADING PORTRAIT 
PHOTOGRAPHERS 

"If It Is a Picture We Make It" 

EXTERIORS, INTERIORS, 

FLASHLIGHTS, WINDOW DISPLAYS 

CATALOGUE WORK 



310 V 2 Georgia Street 
Vallejo, Calif. 



W. W. HEALEY 



NOTARY PUBLIC INSURANCE BROKER 

208 Crocker Building, Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Eleven 



Our Carquinez Straits Cover 



The News Letter has always been in love with those 
vineclad hills of the Napa Valley. Turn back to the News 
Letter of September 1884 and you will find that the 
rumored bridging of Carquinez Strait by the Southern 
Pacific Railway was hailed with glad acclaim by the 
erudite editor of that day. Truly, the bridging of this 
barrier to progress ; this barred front door of one of Cali- 
fornia's greatest playgrounds, is an epoch making event. 

We can see thousands of pretty cottages nestled 
among the vines and the orchards of Napa and Solano 
counties, all because of the fact that San Francisco's 
daughter, Oakland, already shoulder high to her mother, 
must find places for her people to rusticate and recuperate 
from the cares of keeping pace with the growth of the 
Athens of the West. But aside from that we see great 
prosperity for the good people of the north-of-the-bay 
counties. We see hundreds of smokestacks dotting the 
landscape, or should we say seascape, round about the 
confluence of Carquinez and Mare Island Straits. And 
strange as this may seem to those who in acclaiming the 
coming of those pioneers in trans-strait transportation, 
Messrs. Hanford and Klatt, have overlooked it, the bridge 
makes possible the industrial expansion of the south side 
of the strait with its farthest inland deep water, its two 
railroads and its acres of homesites and docking space. 
The industrial development of the Contra Costa shore line 
has been held back because of lack of just one commodity 
— water. And the bridge will make available an inexhaus- 
tible water supply. Whether this supply come from Eel 
River or from the various Sacramento Valley sources, the 
bridge will carry the great pipe line across and the trou- 
blesome barging and round-about ways of getting water, 



resorted to by the California-Hawaiian Sugar Company, 
the various oil companies and such, will be a thing of the 
past. So it fe by serving the motoring public ; by building 
up the back country, and no better ever laid out of doors, 
by earning handsome profits for those who invest their 
money in the enterprise, the founders of this great enter- 
prise will also increase by hundreds of millions the market 
value of that vast expanse of water front property. 

The building of the Carquinez Bridge will do no more 
for the counties of Solano and Napa than will the building 
of the Antioch Bridge for the Counties of Contra Costa 
and Sacramento and Solano. Here the bridge is at the 
front door of a great empire of exceedingly rich soil, 
already famous over the world as the producers of the 
world's supply of asparagus and now held by a handful 
of persons, firms and corporations. This vast acreage will 
undoubtedly be subdivided and thousands of homes, self 
supporting homes, will dot the landscape of California's 
Netherlands. Oh, it's a great project and a visit to the 
workings show that it is more than a project now. It is 
rapidly being completed. The Carquinez Bridge is already 
taking an obvious form, even to the layman, and the Anti- 
och Bridge as this is written looks as though it could be 
driven on for a hundred feet or so. It won't be long now 
until the itinery of every tourist who comes to California 
will include a visit to America's Greatest Highway Bridge 
and we hope that some enterprising soul will build a hotel 
on the Solano side, so that romantic honeymooners may 
wander down to the bridge in the moonlight and from its 
bridge watch the silver ripple of Juna's light upon the 
shimmering surface of beautiful San Pablo Bay. 




CENTRAL BANK 
Benicia, Cal. 



Page Twelve 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 



(D 





■ P !■ 1 



i n ii i 

mini 




PROMINENT BUILDINGS OF VALLEJO, CAL. 
No. 1 — Acme Garage 
No. 2— Paul-Ray Apartments No. 3— Knights of Columbus 

Dalton & Downey. Sacramento, Calif.. No. 4 Hotel Solano, 516 Marin St. 

owners. No. 6 — Stremmel Apartments 



No. 5— Hotel Vallejo, 328 Virginia 

St. 
Ground Floor— Office of the S. F. 

News Letter; Lewis & Snyder, 

Real Estate; Isadore Meyer, 

Vallejo, owner. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Thirteen 




PROMINENT BUILDINGS OF VAI.I.E.IO. CAL. 



No. 1 — Vallejo Public Library. Circu- 
lation 10.000 a month. Number 
Of bound volumes. 20281. Hours 
of Opening week days. 10 a.m. 
to 9 p.m.; Sundays, 1 p.m. to 5 
p.m. 



No. 2 — Virginia Theatre 

>„. :?_St. Charles Hotel. 

>,„. |_Frisch & Higgins Bide. 

No. .*>— I'nited Tire Store. KIT Marin St. 

No. 6 — Solano Ice Cream Co. 

No. 7— Masonic Hall 



Page Fourteen 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 



Industrial Development in the Vicinity 
if Carquinez Straits 



By WARREN H. McBRYDE 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS, from a geographical stand- 
point, is the center of the industrial development 
west of the Rockies, and in many important and in- 
teresting ways is unequalled by any other industrial cen- 
ter in the world. 

The Straits of Carquinez have long been crossed by 
the Southern Pacific ferry from Port Costa to Benicia, 
and incidentally the ferry boats Solano and Contra Costa 
have for years held, and still hold, the record of being 
the largest ferry boats in the world, and named as they 
are for the two counties which they connect. Later the 
Southern Pacific passenger ferry from Vallejo Junction 
to Vallejo was established, and still later the Martinez- 
Benicia auto and passenger ferry was inaugurated be- 
tween Martinez and Benicia, and in more recent years the 
Rodeo- Vallejo Ferry Company established its auto and 
passenger ferry across the westerly portion of Carquinez 
Straits. Last year permits were granted and construc- 
tion work has actually begun on the overhead bridge 
which will span the Straits of Carquinez, so in these ways 
the counties of Solano and Contra Costa have always been 
in very close contact. 

This body of water, thirty miles from the Golden Gate, 
connects San Francisco and San Pablo Bays on the west 
with Suisun Bay, the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers 
on the east. It might be likened to the neck of an hour 
glass through which passes commerce to and from ports 
throughout the wide world. At the same time it is the 
outlet for a large quantity of agricultural products from 
one of the world's greatest valleys, that of the Sacramento 
and San Joaquin Rivers. 

In this connection it is interesting to know as a mat- 
ter of fact that the bed of the Sacramento River, from 
Sacramento to Suisun Bay, is now as deep as it was before 
the days of hydraulic mining and that at least a nine-foot 
channel exists over this entire distance. This has been 
brought about through the cessation of hydraulic mining, 
which prevented further deposit of debris in the river, 
and by the confining of the flood waters of the Sacramento 
River by levies, which have been properly maintained. 

To the west of Carquinez Straits the Pinole Shoals, 
through San Pablo Bay, have been dredged so that a 35- 
foot channel is maintained, and it is of interest to note 
that when the dredging to this depth has been completed, 
for three years thereafter no dredging was necessary, 
proving that this channel practically maintains itself, due 
to the fast running current and large volume of water 
which passes through it. Over eight million tons of 
freight passed through these waters during the year 1923. 

It will thus be noted that the problem of maintaining 
a deep dredged channel has been accomplished so that 
ocean going vessels can safely navigate to the upper end 
of Suisun Bay, and river crafts, drawing as much as nine 
feet, have no trouble in navigating to Sacramento. 

Paralleling these waters, and also connecting the San 
Francisco Bay region with the Sacramento and San Joa- 
quin Valleys, are the main line tracks of the Southern 
Pacific and Santa Fe railroads. These enable freight and 
passengers to move to and from the Pacific northwest, 
the Pacific southwest, and, via the overland route, to and 
from the East. 

Again, paralleling this waterway there exists a most 
magnificent modern system of concrete highways con- 
necting the many different routes which lead to all parts 



of the Pacific Coast, as well as to the highway across 
Nevada and Utah, and to the East. 

Hydro-Electric Power 

Crossing Carquinez Straits are the high tension aerial 
cables of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company and of 
the Great Western Power Company, about a mile apart, 
connecting as they do all of the developed hydro-electric 
power of these companies north of Carquinez Straits with 
the many diversified usages for electric power of the vari- 
ous industries and municipalities in central California and 
the San Francisco Bay region. When it is realized that 
the lines of these two great companies connect with the 
California-Oregon Power Company lines in the northern 
part of this state, extending throughout Oregon, and also 
connect with the San Joaquin Light & Power Company, 
and through it with the Southern California Edison Com- 
pany, together with all of the steam generating plants of 
all of these companies, it will be seen that more electric 
power is concentrated at Carquinez Straits than any other 
point in the world. 

A number of pipe lines extend from the oil fields at 
Bakersfield to the four large oil refineries which are 
located on, or in close proximity to, Carquinez Straits, 
thus giving more fuel in the form of oil and gasoline, and 
with it the necessary lubricating oils, than is produced in 
such close proximity at any other place in the world. Gas 
and water mains also extend throughout this industrial 
area. 

The ocean fogs are dissipated before they reach this 
section of the state, and the tule fogs rarely extend this 
far down the rivers, thus giving to this part of the state 
a most ideal climate in which to work and enjoy life, the 
valley heat being tempered by the ocean trade winds. 

For the above reasons it is only natural that many of 
what are now the world's largest industries have located 
along these waters, within close proximity, and have 
grown and developed to enormous proportions. 

Of Great Historical Interest 

The early history of California includes the establish- 
ment of the arsenal of the United States army at Benicia, 
at the upper end of Carquinez Straits, and in the early 
days was under the command of General William T. Sher- 
man. The capitol of California was at this point in 1853 
and 1854. It is at Benicia that the old mail dock was 
located — the place where rails ended and the Pacific Mail 
steamers docked. 

Coincident with this was the establishment by the 
United States navy of the Mare Island navy yard, under 
the command of Admiral Farragut, and the second capital 
of the state was at Vallejo, at the lower end of Carquinez 
Straits. 

Since that time there have been many other impor- 
tant industries to locate along these straits. Among the 
first developments were the enormous grain docks at 
Port Costa, located in the '50s, when the grain of the 
Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys was transported by 
water, and later by rail, to this central point for trans- 
shipment by vessels to all parts of the world. Later the 
Star Flour Mill was located at Wheatport, now the town 
of Crockett, on Carquinez Straits. This old flour mill has 
been transformed into the new and modern buildings of 
the California and Hawaiian Sugar Refining Corporation, 
which today is the largest sugar refinery in the world and 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Fifteen 



quite frequently has more sugar stored in its warehouses 
than is concentrated at any other point in the world. 

A mile to the west is the American Smelting & Refin- 
ing Company's plant, known as the Selby Smelter, where 
more gold and silver has been refined than in any other 
refinery in the world, with an enormous production of 
lead, in addition. A mile or two still further west is the 
large oil refinery of the Union Oil Company at Oleum, 
and several miles further to the west is the enormous 
plant of the Hercules Powder Company, with its capacity 
for producing more high explosives than any other plant 
in the world, which during the recent war produced 
enormous quantities of TNT, dynamite and black powder 
for the army and navy of the United States and our allies. 
A few miles further west is the Atlas Powder Company's 
dynamite plant at Giant, and still further west we have 
the City of Richmond, which has grown from nothing, in 
1900, to be a city of 25,000 population, and is the fourth 
largest industrial city of the state. 

. A Manufacturing Center 

Here we find the terminus of the Atchison, Topeka & 
Santa Fe Railroad, with its large shops and equipment 
for building and repairing freight cars, and a short dis- 
tance therefrom the largest plant of the Pullman Com- 
pany west of Chicago, in which Pullman cars are built 
and repaired. There are also the four large plants of the 
Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company, where enam- 
eled ware is manufactured in enormous quantities. The 
factory of the Certain-Teed Products Company, for roof- 
ing, and the Santa Fe foundry are located here. Factories 
for fire brick, pressed brick, red brick and quarries for 
concrete rock, and many other industries, are located in 
this industrial city. The largest industry in Richmond is 
the refinery of the Standard Oil Company, the largest oil 
refinery in the world. 

To the east of Carquinez Straits we find the enormous 
oil refinery of the Shell Company of California, located at 
Martinez, the smelter of the Mountain Copper Company, 
and a few miles further east the refinery of the Associ- 
ated Oil Company, second in size only to the Standard Oil 
Company's refinery at Richmond. A few miles further 
east is the Pacific Coast Shipbuilding Company's plant, 
where a number of steel vessels were constructed during 
the war. Here at Bay Point is located the Coos Bay Lum- 
ber Company's plant, the largest lumber yard for pine 
lumber in the West, and a few miles further east, at 
Pittsburg, is located the largest redwood lumber yard in 
the world — the Redwood Manufacturers' Association. The 
General Chemical Company's plant is at Nichols. 

At Pittsburg we also find the enormous modern steel 
plant of the Columbia Steel Company ; large plants of the 
Pioneer Rubber Works, manufacturing all kinds of heavy 
rubber goods ; the Lanteri Ship Yards ; the large plant of 
the Great Western Electro Chemical Company, and the 
paperboard mill and roofing plant of the Paraffin Com- 
panies. In this same locality we find the large fish, veg- 
etable and fruit canneries of the F. E. Booth Company 
and the California Packing Corporation. Ninety per cent 
of the world's asparagus comes from Antioch. A few 
miles inland is the large cement mill of the Cowell Lime 
& Cement Company. 

To the North of the Straits 

Across the waters of the Carquinez Straits to the 
north is found the enormous tannery of the Kuhlmann- 
Salz Company at Benicia, and at Vallejo the mill of the 
Sperry Flour Company, one of the largest flour mills and 
grain elevators in the West. 

Within a radius of only a few miles of Carquinez 
Straits we find the following building and construction 
materials: explosives for use in the quarries, rock, 
cement, brick, lumber, steel and roofing for buildings of 
every name and nature, from residences to the largest 



industrial establishments. From the standpoint of trans- 
portation we find the materials for railroad and highway 
construction, the building of freight and passenger cars, 
wooden and steel ships. Fuel and electric power in un- 
limited quantity. Sugar and flour, gold, silver, copper and 
lead; light and heavy chemicals, rubber goods, porcelain 
ware and many other products, besides the enormous sup- 
ply of fresh and canned fruits and vegetables from one 
of the most productive sections of the West. 

The value of the manufactured products of this indus- 
trial group amounts to over §350,000,000 annually, which 
gives employment to some 30,000 persons and puts into 
circulation wages and salaries amounting to §30,000,000 
per year. 

It has been said: "A nation's material well being is 
measured by its ability to command capital for great pro- 
ductive enterprises and to develop men to build and man- 
age them efficiently." 

The industrial development of Carquinez Straits and 
vicinity has in a wonderful way thus made its contribu- 
tion to the material well being of our state and nation. 



A London taxi driver, putting on a spurt to reach a 
railway station at a certain time, ran down a cart, upset- 
ting the contents. 

A policeman, confronting the taxi driver, demanded 
his name. 

"Michael O'Brien," came the reply. 

"Indeed," said the policeman. "That's my name, too. 
Where do ye come from ?" 

"Cork." 

"And so do I. Now just stand there a moment while I 
go over and charge this man with backing into ye." 



Short Sighted Lady (in Cash and Carry Store) - 
that the head cheese over there?" 

Clerk — "No, that's one of his assistants." 



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423 Georgia Street, Vallejo, Calif. 

The Largest Stationery and Book Store 
in Solano County, Calif. 



Page Sixteen 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 




Emerson Photo 



MARE ISLAND, CAL. 
View Looking North Showing Area Available for Development 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Seventeen 



TOWNPILCRIER 




Q WHO THE DEWLART THOU 
(jUT "ONE THAT WILL PLAY 'THE 
.cJgV^Nwfc/ P EVIL - SIR MTH vou " 



They say that nasturtiums and certain other flowers 
throw out a sort of light which is readily noticeable. So 
do our city hall demagogues at times; but it is the sort 
of light that emanates from rotting fish. 



An old Irishman, who had made the welkin palpitate 
with oratory in the good old days of the Ancient Order 
of Hibernians, was observed creeping about in a dazed 
fashion among all the British flags on Market street. 
Finally he went to the receiving hospital at the city hall 
and asked for admission on the ground that he was seeing 
things which could not be. He was refused admission and, 
finally, convinced of the actuality of the dreadful fact, 
was observed weeping bitterly for hours on the city hall 
steps. 



The much disputed question as to whether a mere 
claim for exemption from service in war time upon the 
ground of alienage was sufficient to prevent his becoming 
a citizen has been settled in favor of the alien by the 
United States Circuit Court of Appeals. It went up on 
writ from the lower court and Judges Ross, Gilbert and 
Rudkin are of the opinion that such claim of exemption 
is not evidence against the applicant's good faith. It is 
an eminently sensible decision, but will be unpopular in 
some quarters. 



W. H. L. Hynes is going from Oakland to the British 
meet of lawyers in London. Edgar Peixotto is going, too. 
To the latter it will be a sort of glorious culmination. It is 
to be hoped that the former will take it as an educational 
opportunity. There are few at the bar who need it more. 



The power question is getting bothersome. Los An- 
geles is to darken, as in war time, and here they are 
urging the adoption of the light-saving device. These 
times are rather good, as they bring out the inherent 
strength in the masses and offset the debilitating luxury 
which has accompanied the late era of prosperity. 



What is all this talk about a self-governing bar? If it 
means that the public will be guaranteed against fraud 
and ignorance upon the part of so-called lawyers, very 
good. But if, on the other hand, it means that independ- 
ence and courage to stand up for an unpopular cause or 
to take the side of the unpopular and weak are to be penal- 
ized, we are not for it. It is easy to say that that cannot 
happen. On the contrary it is just what does happen. It 
is very dangerous to curtail reasonable liberty. 



What would you say of a community where crime 
increased 182 per cent in one year? And what would you 
think when told that crime increased to that degree in a 
community which already was ominously criminal? Yet 
that is just what happened in Los Angeles. Burglary 
increased 90 per cent, grand larceny increased 66 per cent, 
and mui-der increased more than 12 per cent. And yet 
they say that Vollmer vastly improved the police force! 
What would have happened if he had let it alone? 



Really it is incomprehensible how we can raise the 
people who happen to breathe our air and do what they 
do. Take the man at Napa that killed an 8-year-old boy 
with his automobile, calmly put the body out of the 
machine on the sidewalk and drove on. Can you match 



it in any of the beastly annals of human callousness? 
What are we raising? Is our education producing a race 
of unfeeling cannibals devoid of ordinary humanity? If 
so, what is the use of this civilization ? The Scotch, who 
are a clever people, have begun taking away the machines 
of the irresponsible. It sounds good. 



If you want to know the mayor at his best you should 
have seen him with all the admirals and captains the 
other day. Between ourselves that mayor of ours has a 
way with him which would do credit to a marquis at least, 
and we have seen grand dukes do a great deal worse. Such 
manners are born ; not acquired. 



A whole lot of doctors are getting their conges from 
the profession — some by the narcotic route, some by rea- 
son of their working with chiropractors. As for the nar- 
cotic business, there is a lot of hypocrisy about it. The 
profession as a whole knows more about narcotics than 
it cares to say. As for the chiropractor thing; why, the 
homoeopaths were once just as disreputable as the chiro- 
practors are now. These medical priests are scandalously 
afraid of a little heresy. 



You may remember the medieval proverb "There is 
nothing like leather". Same thing applies to Gertrude 
Atherton. Having made a success with a quite clever 
book, "Black Oxen," which was based on a modern theory 
of glandular resurrection, she sees nothing but glands 
now. Jazz is the result of glands. The adrenal glands 
are responsible for all the excitement-loving of today. 
This is over-riding the horse. Something is due perhaps 
to glands, but a good parish priest might be able to help 
out with a diagnosis. 



It is a curious thing that otherwise well informed men 
of affairs do not seem to grasp the idea that a visit to a 
warship on invitation is really a formal affair. Top-hat 
and tail-coat, these belong, and are the necessary uniform 
for the occasion. And yet some well known San Francisco 
business men went climbing on the "Hood" in serge 
jacket and white flannel trousers. The uplift of the eye- 
brows of the impassive British lieutenants was a thing 
to see. 



Nature seeks a balance. You could see that by the 
evident preference which the blonde young Britishers had 
for the dark haired type of girl who visited their ships. 
A delicate skinned, blushing British lad could be seen 
almost anywhere gazing rapturously at an olive-complex- 
ioned large-eyed Californian. It would be curious to know 
just how many international marriages have come out of 
this little trip. 





Carl Leonhardt. 


formerly of Golilen fiate Park Casino 




UNCLE 


TOM'S 


CABIN 




RESTAURANT AND CAFE 




Open 8 A.M. to 11 P.M.— Pop 


ilar Prices 


Tel 


San Bruno 116 




San Bruno. Cal. 



San Francisco Plating Works 

1349-51 Mission St., bet. 9th and 10th 
E. G. Denniston. Prop. Phone Market 2915 

We plate every description of metal work and goods with 
Gold, Silver, Nickel, Brass, Copper and Bronze in an ele- 
gant and durable manner. 

We call for and deliver work 
Automobile and Household Goods a Specialty 



Page Eighteen 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 




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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Nineteen 



KSVM 



Paramount Paragraphs 



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The higher education may make a murderer too good 
to be hung. 

* * * 

A sign for grade crossings: "Only three more yards 
to Kingdom Come." 

* * * 

Dark horses are having much more of an exciting 
time than the logical candidates. 

* * * 

You might keep your nose out of other people's busi- 
ness by holding it to the grindstone. 

If only the boll weevil, the corn borer and the cut 
worm could be persuaded to join the I.W.W. 

* * * 

Old Ben Franklin's saying should be given publicity 
at these clamorous conventions: "Well done is better than 
well said." 

* * * 

Well, any way, the automobile has helped to make 
people forget that they have legs. 

* * * 

The prevailing styles are making women look more 
and more like turtles, with their clipped heads, small 
necks, close-fitting, helmet hats and absence of waist 
lines. 

Women have done much in the past in the way of 
conserving sections of California forests for national 
parks. Now they must further some scheme of action 
whereby these forests will be saved from the fires that 
blast them annually. 

* * * 

Children must be intensely exasperating to their 
mothers at times. Meeting a friend recently who harbors 
the fond delusion that her offspring are paragons of good 
behavior, we asked her how they had enjoyed their vaca- 
tion with their grandmother. She assured us that her 
mother had been delighted with the children, and had 
been very sorry to see them go. We both started when a 
small, shrill voice piped up behind her: "Oh, yes, we had 
a fine time, but grandma said we were enough to give her 
the nervous prostrations, and she never was so glad about 
anything as when daddy came to bring us home." 

* * * 

So few people, apparently, understand how to develop 
kinship with Mother Nature. How to draw upon her ever 
abundant resources for strength and health. That is 
why there are so many different kinds of "cures" for dis- 
eases which are not cures at all ; that are not, in fact, even 
palliatives. Hard-earned dollars are spent in the new fad 
"color cure", while the patient sits or lies in stuffy offices 
with rays of colored light thrown from a man-made 
machine over his body. 

* * * 

It never occurs to these nervous and over-indulged 
humans that there may be more health and strength in 
one ray of the sun, than in all the violet rays combined, 
and that basking in his beneficent glow is what they need 
more than anything else. Go out, pale one, into the sand 
dunes and lie full length under some smooth and velvety 
hillock, under the open light of heaven ; feel the yielding 
sand under your body warm with the vital forces of life ; 
the breeze from the unconquerable ocean on your cheek ; 
the tang of fragrant herbs — baccharus, yarrow, sand ver- 



bena — in your nostrils, and realize that you are one with 
all the goodness of the good old earth. 

Frank H. Simonds tells us that "aside from Russia, 
five years of shaking down have brought an impressive 
consolidation of the Europe created at Paris. A new 
Europe is now functioning, far from perfect, but at least 
in such a fashion as to give promise of survival. Such dis- 
putes as Fiume, Upper Silesia, innumerable Balkan quar- 
rels, have disappeared from the agenda of actual political 
discussion. Everywhere there is evidence that Europe is 
settling down to the conditions created for it by the war 
and the peace settlements of Paris." 

* * * 

And then comes Winston Churchill: "Now, as ever, 
there stands the terrible overpowering issue between 
France and Germany. Unless this deadly antagonism can 
in some way be laid to rest or merged in a larger, wider 
and nobler consciousness, a future generation will assur- 
edly see Europe laid in dust and ashes. . . . It is a peril 
which should never be absent from the mind, and in 
regard to which every word should be measured and 
spoken only with bated breath." 

* * * 

Some men were talking in a barber shop last Tuesday 
(yes, men still talk among themselves in barber shops, in 
spite of bobbed heads around), discussing the Olympic 
stunts in Europe. Different nationales were boasting of 
records made in running and jumping, when up spoke an 
Irish-American: "The French or the English or the Eye- 
talians may run and jump the best," said he, "but it takes 
a son of the Emerald Isle to stand up and fight!" 



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Manufacturers of 

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Page Twenty 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 




DIRTY TOOLS 

The true significance of the senatorial investigations 
which caused such a flurry a few months ago is beginning 
to be manifest. The conviction of Gaston B. Means of 
conspiracy as a bootlegger fixes the character of one, at 
least, of the most important witnesses before the com- 
mittee. This conviction really sheds no new light on the 
character of Means, which was well known at the time 
that he testified. It is merely a public recognition of that 
which was well understood beforehand. The senatorial 
committee knew this man's reputation well. He was 
awaiting trial even at the time that he testified. He was 
allowed to indulge in guesses and gossip and to attack the 
character of men who had no chance to defend themselves 
against his slanders. All this was done for political pur- 
pose and in order to smirch the character of men regarded 
as politically dangerous to the interests of some of the 
senators. It is by no means a pretty story of contempo- 
rary political life in this country. In the reign of Charles 
II, one Titus Oates went on a career of slander and per- 
jury involving some of the most distinguished and able 
men of the time in imaginary plots and treasons. Finally, 
of course, the vileness of Oates was exposed and the story 
has lingered in English history as a disgraceful and 
utterly discreditable episode. So it will be with these com- 
mittee hearings. For the present, they have their political 
uses, as the turbulent excitement in the Democratic con- 
vention bears witness. But all this flurry will pass away 
and in the course of time will come to be regarded as a 
very discreditable performance on the part of men who 
might have been supposed to know better, but who were 
seduced by the political game into acts which are at least 
unethical. People who have to rely upon such witnesses 
as Means, show little sense of decency in prosecuting 
their case. 



THE FIRE PEST 

Time has come when the government must take 
strong action to prevent forest fires in this state, or we 
shall be confronted with loss and dangers not pleasant 
to contemplate and too great to be readily calculated in 
advance. The fact is, that we have passed the stage 
when access to the forests can be unreservedly granted. 
Formerly we had a community which was more or less 
actually familiar with country life and which knew how 
to behave in the country. Among such people the fire 
risks, always to some degree present, were at their low- 
est. That era has passed, and our population is, to an 
increasing extent, composed of town-bred people who 
know nothing of fire risks and who behave with very 
reprehensible abandon. Formerly, too, a fire would burn 
itself out in a limited area without coming into contact 
with settled regions and imperiling whole cities, as hap- 
pened at Berkeley last year and as almost happened in 
East Oakland last week. At the latter place there was 
imminent risk of many thousands being rendered home- 
less by a fire, which a shift in the wind, fortunately but 
quite unexpectedly, diverted. The risks are, of course, 
increased by the vastly greater numbers of campers 
which the cheap automobile has allowed to go on camping 
excursions for weeks at a time. A number of such people, 
we regret to say, have not developed to the point where 
they can be safely trusted with a machine, for their con- 
duct is marked by the grossest selfishness and disregard 
of the rights of others. Such people may be expected to 



be indifferent as to the results of their actions. As a mat- 
ter of fact, they are utterly irresponsible. Such being the 
case, it is the duty of the government to be ruthless in 
its preservation of life and property. No fear of being 
called "tyrannical" should have any influence with the 
government whose first and primary duty is such preser- 
vation. 



THE BRITISH FLEET 

The British fleet has come and gone. It was a visit of 
great international significance, for it was the first oppor- 
tunity that we have had since the war of voicing our 
recognition of the fact that for years the safety of the 
world has rested on the British fleet. We have seen but 
little of its power, for the fleet is a busy organization 
which goes to and fro in the world keeping the lines of 
commerce open and spreading the British peace abroad. 
Now and again we have had friendly intimations of its 
actual existence, as when it stood by us in Manila Bay, 
and only yesterday, when one of its captains visited sum- 
mary punishment on a Chinese town for killing an Ameri- 
can. Ten years ago it went suddenly into the mists of 
Scapa Flow and lay there the shield of Empire through 
the years of hell, only emerging to strike blows of incom- 
parable strength, as at Dogger Bank and Jutland. We 
saw the ensign streaming from the stern of the ships as 
they lay at anchor in our bay. That is the ensign that 
from the time of Blake has sheltered under its folds the 
greatest line of admirals that the world has ever seen. 
One after another the rest have tried to lower it, Spain, 
Holland, France, and again France and Spain together, 
and ever it has held aloft the gleam of victory. "The 
Meteor flag of England" the poet calls it. Times change 
and with the times change the modes, and the flame and 
fire of Trafalgar is succeeded by the more prosaic waiting 
in Scapa Flow. But to Scapa Flow came the German fleet 
all in good time, in full surrender, and its bones are rot- 
ting in the cold North Seas. The British fleet is, and 
always has been, a power for good, an immeasurably 
great power for peace and liberty, and so we saluted it 
and at the same time we bore in mind that our own boys 
had died fighting with the sailors of the British fleet. 



THE POT BUBBLES 

The long tense strain between Great Britain and 
France is now culminating. One way or the other, the 
matter must be decided in the very near future. It was 
to settle this that the business and commercial powers in 
Britain have submitted to the burden and humiliation of 
a working class government. It was to achieve a peaceful 
and rapid solution of the difficulties that now the liberals, 
now the conservatives, have held up the hands of Mac- 
Donald. Two weeks ago the affair seemed likely to cul- 
minate satisfactorily. A new election in France had 
brought into power a government in many respects like 
that in Britain, and a complete rapprochement between 
Herriot and MacDonald seemed the most probable thing. 
There was a rapprochement. The two premiers met and 
went over the whole field and arrived at what they con- 
sidered a satisfactory conclusion. Now the Herriot min- 
istry is in danger. Poincare has set afloat rumors that the 
Versailles treaty is threatened and that the whole plan 
of keeping Germany in an abject state will have to be 
abandoned if the two premiers carry out their program. 
The effects of this attack by the Poincare faction have 
been so marked as to threaten to upset the whole scheme, 
and MacDonald is off to Paris to try and get the French 
to see the affair from his standpoint. If he fails, or if 
the Herriot ministry falls, MacDonald will fall, too; be- 
cause the commercial and industrial powers in Britain 
are not going to maintain a labor party without some 
accomplishments on its part which will pay for the loss 
of control. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Twenty-one 



X6t»i 



w^J* 



Wheat and Chaff 



Bv NATHANIEL ANDERSON 



KGp^ei 



sr«s9Si 



A great fault with many writers is, they don't know 
exactly what they are doing, disputing, as they do, their 
own point in different instances of their text. They think, 
no doubt, they write naturally, injecting, as it were, 
whatever comes into their thought, when logic should 
reject all that does not bear directly on the subject. One 
idea reminds of another from the habit of the brain to 
grasp at what is of only apparent similarity. It is auto- 
suggestion dear to the hearts of orators, but scribes 
should be more careful. 

Many of us do not know whether we are laughing or 
crying; we write in mixed moods, and the readers get 
nothing positive from us, for, truthfully, we ought to 
score by an exact kind feeling. It approaches atmosphere 
in painting. Likewise, our words are like color ; a wrong 
choice of them, or the phrases, will throw the reader into 
an aspect not intended by the writer ; quotations of a sort 
that seem to apply are often totally out of keeping. 
Using them wrongly is one of the faults of bad style. 
Sudden efforts to be funny, that jerk the reader from 
thinking with the author of an idea, is like ridiculing the 
person who thought he showed good sense in listening to 
what is said. There should be no objection to occasional 
humor in serious attempts, but the kind of humor is meas- 
ured by the general tendency or tone of the writing, and it 
only exasperates an author's friends to regardlessly jump 
from reason to play the clown. It is inelegant, which is 
not the case of humorists, like Bill Nye and Ring Lardner ; 
they are neither elegant nor inelegant. Take Lardner, for 
instance. He keeps to his style and, on his part, would 
seem foolish if for some lack of control, in the midst of 
his fun, he moved on to classic writing. 
* * * 

Few of us on our own account take on prejudice. What 
small measure we might have, would be dropped if no 
influence were brought to bear on that to be observed of 
other races and religions different from our own. Many 
people bother little, one way or the other, about the other 
fellow, except to trade with him or live naturally with him 
in the same social state, and if less were said about "that 
Jew" or "what can you expect of a Dago?" there would 
not be nearly so much race antagonism existing. The 
worst among us for prejudice are those brought up with 
it from the cradle. I believe the head of one of the big 
telegraph companies was reared that way, and in his par- 
ticular work had no occasion to become closely associated 
with the chosen people. He told a young lady of his 
acquaintance, who mentioned she had a good friend in 
one of them: "Now, don't you go marrying a Jew!" I 
always thought Mr. M would have liked that particu- 
lar Jew himself, had he known him. 

There is another case of a Scotch landlady who had 
been told nothing about the prosecuted race in the nurs- 
ery ; their members she met afterwards only in business 
dealings, as she did everybody else, for she lived very 
much alone. A bill collector at her door told her there 
would soon be a Catholic president, and the country would 
be ruled by the Pope. Over this, really, she became very 
much excited, and discussed the subject with one of her 
lodgers. 

"Well, how would you like a Jew for president?" the 
latter asked her. 

"I don't know," she said, "but, any way, the Jews are 
Protestants, aren't they?" 



Are we ever going to have a newspaper that is one for 
those who want the news, and not much else? It is tire- 
some to the eye searching the events of the day in the 
journals as we know them. To read what happens 
throughout the year, it is necessary to handle about a 
ton of extra printed matter. 



Mrs. Henry Landes, acting mayor of Seattle, evi- 
dently out to kill graft, is a woman of action, and sets a 
moving example to men who are not. She knows how to 
make things go in cleaning up vice. Without lending 
sympathy to the prohibition law, or efforts to be too 
Puritanical, it is a bad thing when, as she pointed out to 
the chief of police, the "leading spirit of the liquor ring" 
is "a frequent and apparently welcome visitor at police 
headquarters." Such a state of affairs shows poor admin- 
istration. 

In the absence of Mayor Edwin J. Brown, the vigorous 
Mrs. Landes was put at the helm. Then she told the police 
chief to get quickly to work about the rocky affairs in 
his department; in other words, to "get busy". She waited 
a scant 24 hours and discharged him. The lady is no 
figurehead. 

Why is it all of us who have a bit of feeling or intui- 
tion grow animated when we see an open fire ? It is said 
because our ancestors sat around log fires in the open. 
We hark back to the ancient family circle, and we do 
more, because most of us remember the fireplace of home ; 
a stove, too, well kindled within, warms our hearts as it 
does our bones. It is the family sentiment, and the life 
which is the stability of the nation. There is a check on 
the doings of the wild boy, the wayward girl, who remem- 
bers with respect, brothers, sisters, father and mother in 
the fireside picture. People do not live in apartment 
houses long enough to establish the feeling of a real 
household. 



We will give Suzanne Lenglen, the tennis star, one 
more chance before we come to an awful conclusion when 
she gets sick just about the time she is to meet a formid- 
able opponent. She was accused of having a bad case of 
stage fright in failing to come to the scratch when there 
was to be a crucial test of her dexterity at tennis about 
a year ago. The other day, nearing the time to be 
matched against Helen Wills, she again quit, claiming 
enlargement of the liver. If it happens a third time, we 
shall be forced to conclude her trouble is yellow liver. 

Miss Wills, by the way, did not become champion at 
England, but she uttered not a whimper, holding up her 
reputation not only as a first-class player, despite her 
youth, but also as a very good sport. 



Some among us have such splendid constitutions that 
we can digest what good there is even in very bad food. 
It is the same with the constitution of the United States. 
It stands for a great deal ; it is so strong it bears up under 
a great load — a safeguard despite bad laws and lax 
administration. 

* * * 

Men in business are complaining of too much taxing 
and licensing and too high rents. It is getting to the point 
where only businesses of the largest kind can stand the 
strain. The small merchant should have as much oppor- 
tunity to succeed as the big one. If the working man 
deserves to be championed, so does he, and if we are not 
careful, we shall be in a worse state than England was, 
when Napoleon called it a nation of shop-keepers. We 
shall be a nation of clerks. 



Page Twenty-two 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 




ocier 




RECEPTION 

THE CALIFORNIA BRANCH of tile English Speaking Union gave 
a reception Tuesday at the Fairmont, in honor of the visiting 
admirals and other officers of the British fleet. Admiral S. S. 
Robinson, United States Navy, and his staff and resident Ameri- 
can naval officers were also complimented at the affair. Mrs. 
Joseph D. Grant, head of the committee, had charge and was 
assisted by a group of prominent women and girls. 



BUSY CUPID 

MISS ISABEL DE VIOSCA, daughter of the late consul for Mexico 
to San Francisco, and Mrs. Isabel de Viosca, was married Mon- 
day in Hollister to Mr. Joseph P. Toole Jr. Though an engage- 
ment had existed for some time, no formal announcement had 
ever been made. Present at the marriage were Mrs. de Viosca 
and a sister of the bride. Miss Laura de Viosca. The bride is a 
connection of Mrs. William Revilla of New Orleans (Miss 
Rosita Nieto y Viosca), Mrs. Farquar Laing of Farnley Grange 
England (Miss Josephine Nieto y Viosca) and Mrs. Angel 
Echevarria (Miss Marie Eloise de Nieto y Viosca). Mr. Toole 
is the son of the former Governor of Montana and Mrs. Toole. 

MISS JEANETTE SESSIONS and Mr. Milo Edwin Rowell of Fresno 
will be married on Tuesday, July 29. The ceremony will be 
held at high noon in the New Church at Lyon and Washington 
streets. The only attendant for the bride will be Mr. Rowell's 
sister, Miss Margaret Rowell of Fresno. The best man will be 
Mr. Maynard Munger of Piedmont. 

MRS. MARION MARONEY BLISS was married Tuesday to Irwin 
Scott, assistant general superintendent of the Matson Naviga- 
tion Company. The wedding was a quiet affair at the home of 
the bride's mother, Mrs. Edwin N. Short, 1951 Jackson street, 
attended by the members of the two families. The ceremony 
was read by Rev. Thomas Day and was followed by an informal 
wedding supper. 

MISS HELEN PERKINS, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William F. Per- 
kins, had the pleasure of surprising her friends at a luncheon 
party given July 3 by her sister, Mrs. Alfred Oyster, when she 
announced her engagement to Carl Stever. The wedding will be 
an event of September. Miss Perkins has been one of the most 
popular belles of society for the past two seasons or so. Mrs. 
C. C. Trowbridge is a sister, and among the kin are Mrs. Frank 
Kendall, Mrs. Alice Spencer, Messrs. P. F. Dunne and J. M. 
Masten. Mr. Stever is a sone of Mrs. Mathilde Stever of this 
city. He is a graduate of Stanford and of the University of 
Nevada. 

LUNCHEONS 

MRS JOHN HOWARD CHILD, who, with Mr. Child, recently re- 
turned to Santa Barbara from a stay of several months in New 
York, gave a large luncheon last week at the Montecito Country 
Club.' Mrs. Thomas A. Driscoll, who is visiting her mother, 
Mrs. Bacon, in Santa Barbara, was among the luncheon guests. 

MISS ELEANOR MORGAN, who is visiting her sister, Mrs. Norris 
King Davis, in Santa Barbara, was the guest of honor at a 
luncheon given last week at the Montecito Country Club by 
Mrs. Charles Thayer. 

TEAS 

MRS. JOSEPH MASON REEVES of New York, who is spending the 
summer in California, was guest of honor at a tea given a few 
days ago by her mother, Mrs. Susan Watkins, at her home in 
San Rafael. 

MRS. WILLIAM G. TURNER was hostess Monday afternoon at an 
attractive tea at the Fairmont Hotel for a group of service 
matrons. To the regret of a wide circle of friends Colonel and 
Mrs. Turner left Wednesday for station at Kansas City. 

MISS ANNIE PENTZ and her nieces, Miss Deborah and Miss Edith 
Pentz, gave a large tea at San Rafael to meet Miss Mary Pentz, 
a cousin, who is passing several weeks a guest here from 
New York. Receiving with the hostesses were Mrs. Eugene 
Plunkett, Mrs. William Horn, Mrs. Paul Jones and Mrs. William 
Hugh Freeland. 

MRS. BELLE BANNER was a recent hostess at a charming dinner 
at the Hotel Richelieu where she makes her home. Covers were 
laid for nine. 



DINNERS 

MRS. HORACE D. PILLSBURY was hostess at the Montecito Coun- 
try Club at one of the largest parties given on July the Fourth. 

REAR ADMIRAL AND MRS. EDWARD SIMPSON were hosts at a 
dinner Monday evening in honor of Vice Admiral Sir Frederick 
Field, K. C. B., commander of the British Fleet, and a group of 
officers of the British Special Service Squadron. The dinner was 
held at the Fairmont hotel, and to it were bidden, besides, a 
number of the high ranking officers in the American navy, with 
their wives and other society women. 

BRITISH CONSUL-GENERAL and Mrs. Gerald Campbell enter- 
tained at a dinner dance at the Palace Hotel Monday evening 
in honor of some of the officers of the British squadron. The 
party included, among others, Judge N. S. Field, brother of 
Vice-Admiral Sir Frederick Field, Group Captain Christie, Air 
Attache, British Embassy at Washington, and Mrs. G. H. Thomp- 
son, secretary to the British Embassy. 

MR. AND MRS. FREDERICK McNEAR entertained at a dinner 
dance Monday evening to celebrate the third anniversary of 
their wedding. The affair was attended by about thirty friends 
of the hosts. 

MRS. LEE ELEANOR GRAHAM entertained for Mrs. Harry Scott 
at dinner at Santa Barbara Monday evening. 

DANCES 

THE GENERAL COMMITTEE of welcome was ably aided in its 
multitudinous duties as hosts to the British Service Squadron 
this week, by the Entertainment Committee of Representative 
San Francisco Women, of which Mrs. W. B. Hamilton was 
chairman and Mrs. Mabel T. Johnson (director of Hospitality 
Bureau of the Chamber of Commerce) was vice-chairman, dur- 
ing the three days' visit of the soldiers of the sea. The follow- 
ing were hostesses at the dance given Wednesday night in the 
Exposition auditorium: Dr. Susan B. Hamilton, Mrs. A. W. 
Scott, Mrs. Hunter Liggett, Mrs. F. H. Ainsworth, Mrs. C. S. 
Peoples, wife of Admiral Peoples, Mrs. Beatrice Judd Ryan, Mrs. 
E. W. Crellin, Mrs. W. B. Hamilton, Mrs. Edward Simpson, Mrs. 
E. S. Breyfogle, Mrs. Mabel T. Johnson, Mrs. W. C. Neville, 
Mrs. Cyril Cane, wife of Cyril Cane of the British Consulate, 
Mrs. Sarah Lillian Coffin. 

IN TOWN AND OUT 

MRS. RICHARD D. GIRVIN and Miss Mary Eyre have gone to 
Santa Barbara to spend two months at El Encanto. 

MRS. MACONDRAY MOORE arrived home last week after an ab- 
sence of four months in Europe. 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS EASTLAND and Miss Alice Eastland have 
returned to their home in Burlingame after having passed the 
week-end in Woodside as guests of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. 
Jackling. 

MISS MARIAN ZEILE has gone to Montecito to be the house guest 
of Mr. and Mrs. Talbot Walker for several weeks. 

MISS MARION BIRD arrived last week from her home in Salt 
Lake City and is the guest of her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. Walker Salisbury, at their home in Burlingame. 

MISS GERTRUDE MURPHY', the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene 
Murphy, left last week for Lake Tahoe, where she is the guest 
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Poett and Miss Evelyn Poett. 

MRS. SEWARD McNEAR, Mrs. Joseph Mason Reeves of New York; 
Mrs. Edwin L. Griffith and Miss Mary Pauline Coppee left 
Tuesday for Lake Tahoe for a brief visit. They will join Mrs. 
William Kent, who has taken a house at the lake for the season. 

MR. AND MRS. WALTER E. BUCK have gone to Wawona for the 
mid-summer. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Van Ness Ave,, at Geary Street 

Is the most refined family hotel 
— a home unsurpassed 

ELMER M. WOODBURY, Manager 



SAN FRANCISCO 
the city 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

MR. AND MRS. ALBERT EVERS and their children are passing 
the summer with -Mrs. Elvers' parents, Dr. and Mrs. Kaaper 
Pischell. Mr. and Mrs. Evers returned recently from a visit to 
Mr. Evers' parents in Denver. 

ENSIGN PETER HILL DUNN, D. S. N., anil his bride, who was Miss 
Lelia Voorhies Scott, the daughter of Mrs. Guy T. Scott of 
Washington, D, C. arrived recently at San Diego, where they 
are to make their home and where the young officer is on duty. 

MISS KATHARINE RAMSEY and her brother-in-law. Mr. Charles 
Blyth, with his two young daughters, the Misses Marjorie and 
Barbara Blyth, left last week for Santa Barbara, where they 
will spend the month of July at El Mirasol. 

MR. AND MRS. MARSHALL DILL and their son, Master Marshall 
Dill Jr., left Friday for Ross, where they will remain until Sep- 
tember. They have joined Mrs. Dill's brother-in-law and sister, 
Commander and Mrs. Kirby Crittenden. 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE WHITTELL are taking their first long 
trip on their new yacht, having left for the South Saturday. 
They plan to go as far south as Lower California. It is one of 
the largest steam yachts on the coast. 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD H. CLARK have arrived from their home 
in New York and are at the Fairmont. They are spending much 
time in Burlingarne with their daughter, Mrs. Howard Park, 
and their son, Mr. Edward H. Clark Jr. 

MRS. WALTER HOBART and her sister, Mrs. Frederick Hussey 
are at their ranch in Nevada. Later Mr. and Mrs. Hussey will 
go north for a trip. Mr. Hobart is at his cottage at Lake Tahoe 
and Mrs. Hobart will divide the summer between the ranch and 
Tahoe. 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH 0. TOBIN and their children are the guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. George A. Newhall at Lake Tahoe. 

MRS. WILLIAM D. TUBBS and Miss Emily Tubbs arrived at Santa 
Barbara a day or so ago for the months of July and August, 
which they will pass at San Ysidro. 

MR. AND MRS. PERCY J. WALKER, Miss Marjorie Walker and 
Master Jack Walker are at Miramar from their home in Berke- 
ley for a month or so. Miss Walker is on vacation from Vassar, 
where she is a student. 

DR. AND MRS. EDWARD ERLE BROWNELL and Miss Sophie and 
Miss Harriet Brownell arrived at Miramar a day or so ago. 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM LINDLEY ABBOTT (Sallie Obear) con- 
cluded a stay at El Mirasol and motored south to Los Angeles. 

MR. AND MRS. VINCENT BUTLER (Lucy Hanchett) have been 
with Mrs. Butler's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Hanchett, for 
the Fourth of July holidays at the Hanchett home at Moutecito. 

MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL T. BERNHARD returned on the third 
after a tour of Europe, which they have been enjoying for the 
last few months, and are now established in their home in Palm 
avenue. Mr. Bernhard has numerous very interesting stories 
to tell of their travels, as they visited all the historic cities of 
the old world. 

INTIMATIONS 

MR. AND MRS. WARREN SMITH are receiving the congratulations 
of their friends on the birth of twins — a son and daughter — 
which occurred on Saturday. Mrs. Smith and her other little 
daughter, Miss Cora Smith, have been spending the summer in 
San Francisco with Mr. and Mrs. James Otis. 

LIEUTENANT COMMANDER AND MRS. ELLSWORTH HARPER 
VAN PATTEN, who have made their home in Washington since 
their marriage, will arrive in San Francisco the middle of 
August to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John McGaw. 

MR. AND MRS. CALVERT JUDKINS are receiving congratulations 
on the arrival of a son on July 4. Mrs. Judkins before her mar- 
riage was Miss Elizabeth Funke of Alameda. 

MR. AND MRS. MILLEN GRIFFITH of Ross had their young daugh- 
ter christened at St. John's Episcopal Church last Sunday, the 
Reverend H. H. Powell officiating. Miss Rebecca Mixner and 
Miss Harriett Hunt became the child's god-mothers, and Dr. 
Lovell Langstroth. her god-father. She was christened Eugenia 
Coppe. 

MRS. CYRUS PEIRCE and daughters. Josephine and Mary Eloise 
Peirce, who have been abroad for two years or so, are en route 
here. They are at Lake Tahoe for the present. 



Page Twenty-three 

MRS. GEORGE T. MARYE and her daughter, Miss II 
Balled last Friday tor New York from Europe, ami afti 
slay in Hi,. Easl will join Mr. Marye al their Burlingarne home. 

The gown worn by Mrs. Marye when she was presented in June 
al the Court of si. James was one of the innsl beautiful "!' Hi" 
many handsome costumes seen at the court. 

MRS. WHITELAW RE1D has been decorated by King George and 
has become a Lady of Grace of the Hospital of St. John of 
Jerusalem. The decoration was presented by the Kins in the 
presence of the Duke of Connaught and the Knights and Ladies 
of Justice for Mrs. Reid's services during the World War. The 
Archbishop of York assisted at the ceremonies. It is a distin- 
guished honor, especially for an American woman. 

MISS HILDRETH MEIERE will be here for the midsummer to visit 
her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Meiere. She is engaged in 
doing the murals in the Nebraska state building. 

MR. AND MRS. ALMER NEWHALL, Masters Aimer, Scott and Hall 
Newhall are passing the week-end at Bolinas, where they have 
a cottage and where they spend a great part of the summer. 
Miss Caroline Avery and her fiance, Mr. Benjamin Hayne Jr., 
are passing the week-end as their guests. Miss Avery will leave 
in August for Plainfield, N. J., where she will join her mother, 
Mrs. Jacob Van Deventer and Mr. Van Deventer. 

ST. FRANCIS 

SCORES OF INFORMAL GROUPS met during the luncheon hour 
at the Hotel St. Francis Monday and later witnessed the arrival 
of the British fleet. Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton had in her party 
Mrs. Robert Hays Smith, Mrs. Frederick McNear and Mr. Jack 
Breeden. 

MRS. CHARLES W. CLARK and Miss Helen Cheseborough lunched 
tete-a-tete. 

MRS. LAURANCE I. SCOTT was hostess to Mrs. Eugene Murphy 
and Mrs. Gerald Rathbone. 

RICHELIEU 

SINCE THE ARRIVAL OF MRS. D. LEE HIRSCHLER from Nor- 
folk, Virginia, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hirschler, 
many social events have been given in her honor. With Mrs. 
Hirschler is her handsome young son, Edwin. 

FEATHER RIVER INN 

FEATHER RIVER INN, the ideal mountain resort in the high 

Sierras, was full to capacity over the Fourth of July week-end 

and Walter Rounsevel, manager, was compelled to refuse some 

two hundred reservations. 
GUESTS REGISTERING AT THE INN included the following of 

San Francisco: Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Buckbee. Mr. E. C. Bull, Mr. 

and Mrs. M. Fleischacker, Mr. and Mrs. H. Galgianni, Geo. A. 

Webster and wife, Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Chaquette and family; 

E. Clemens Horst and family; Mr. and Mrs. Abner Doble, Dr. 

and Mrs. H. H. Searles. 

DEL MONTE 

SAN FRANCISCO PEOPLE at Del Monte over the holiday week-end 
included: Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Arnisby. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Carroll, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Folger. Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Rutherford, Mr. 
and Mrs. Win. H. Orrick, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice J. Sullivan, Dr. 
and Mrs. Grant Selfridge. Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Brady, Mr. and 
Mrs. H. W. Dakin and Miss Dakin. Mr. and .Mis. Warren W. 
Speiker, San Francisco. 

THE BIGGEST THRONGS of the year are at Del Monte and Del 
Monte Lodge. The Fourth of July holiday week-end was one 
of the gayest ever known at the fashionable Monterey penin- 
sula resort. 

MR. AND MRS. LEON" ROOS celebrated the eighteenth anniversary 
of their marriage by having a dinner party at the Del Monte. 

MR. AND MRS. HARRY HUNT, of Pasadena, who are at Del Monte 
making plans for the erection 01 their Pebble Beach home, gave 
a Fourth of July party at Del Monte for a group of friends. 

WEEK-END GAIETIES at Del Monte Lodge were enlivened by a 
series of dinner and dance parties and a private golf tourna- 
ment organized by a Burlingaine club group, including: Vin- 
cent Whitney, Geo. Nickel. Dean Witter, A. B. Swinerton, Roger 
Lapham. Warren Speiker. W. R. Roth, A. A. Wilson, H. Rose, 
William Lieb, S. Schneider and Stuart Haldron. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Bush Street, Between Powell and Stockton. San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



STAGE TRAINING 

NATHANIEL ANDERSON. Couch 

Director — Pacific Players 

THE LEGITIMATE WAY 

This is actual practice: no theory nor false methods: vital: professional 

STIDIO 506 KOHLER & CHASE BLDG.. KEARNY i4.il 



Page Twenty-four 




CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 

the board, to think up something to tickle Rolph's fancy 
as counter sop to Tim's juvenile hokum, and, if the mayor 
isn't totally spoiled by politics, it's for him to laugh at the 
sycophancy of it all. 



Bv ANTISTHENES 



O'Dowd on Wall Street Candidates 

"O'Kare, did ye see phwhere the Dimmycratic convin- 
tion wint agin John Davis because he is attorney fur J. 
Pierpont Morrgan?" 

"Yis, Oi see that, O'Dowd, an' it wuz the Great com- 
moner, Willum Jennins, phwhat made the most av the 
racket about it. But, Oi think he's roight, at that, man, 
fur the poor payple kin niver expict annything from Whall 
sthreet." 

"So, O'Kane, Oi see ye're loike the rist av the be- 
noighted citizens av this grreat counthry; ye're thinkin' 
Willum Jennins is agin Misther Davis because he's got a 
job in Whall sthreet! Will, it's the loikes av ye the poli- 
ticians want to kape ignorint, so ye can blather away wid 
the rist av the crrowd in favor av the candedate who is 
pure av the taint av Whall sthreet gould!" 

"But, O'Dowd, Whall sthreet is no frind av the poor 
payple — which Oi am, — an' phwhoy shouldn't Oi be fur 
the man who's agin thim robbers? Oi'm proud av it, 
O'Dowd, to be agin thim." 

"But, O'Kane, Oi ask ye this: Phwhoy pick out Whall 
sthreet, an' it only wan av the sthreets phwhere all the 
money is ? If ye're goin' to lambaste the rich min, phwhoy 
the divil d'ye selict jist wan av thim? Sposin' Bryan runs 
fur prisidint ; he's a wilthy man, O'Kane, an' a dom fool 
if he cud make money an a tip frum Whall sthreet, an' 
not do it, an' — he's no fool — yit, ye, an' others loike ye, 
wud wote fur him because he sez: 'To hell wid Whall 
sthreet', as if Whall sthreet wuz the only place phwhere 
ye cud make money ar have it taken away frum ye! 
O'Kane, that's not phwhoy the diligates an' the big polly- 
ticians are agin a man loike Davis. Raymimber, Oi'm not 
sayin' Oi'm fur Davis, but jist thryin' to show how the 
suvrin payple is always gettin' fooled. Davis is a smart 
man, John, ar Whall sthreet wudn't be givin' him a foine 
job, an', maybe he's loike manny smart min an' won't take 
arders frum annywan. Now, s'posin' he wuz elicted, an' 
wan av the p'litical bosses who wants somethin' fur the 
gang which isn't roight, cums to him an' sez: 'Misther 
Prisidint, we want ye to do so an' so', an' because he's a 
smart man, O'Kane, an' raysons it out that he shuddent 
do so an' so, he sez to the boss: 'Oi can't do it, boss, be- 
cause me rayson tills me it's not roight an' not good fur 
the payple'. Thin, how wud ye expict the bosses to git 
annything out av a man loike that, an' phwhoy shud 
the bosses worrk to elict him an' they knowin' they cudn't 
git innything back in return? O'Kane, Oi tell ye, it's not 
the riches, but the smartness an' the silf-will av the can- 
dedate, that the politicians aren't wantin'. In these harrd 
toimes, no wan is turnin' up the nose at a dollar, an', a 
dollar frum Whall sthreet is the same as wan frum 
Doheeny, ar the railroads, ar anny av the carporations, 
an' none av the byes is sthoppin' to figger much phwhere 
the dollar cums frum — there's no toime to sthop, O'Kane, 
an' so manny arround riddy to grab it." 



It's all so infantile, we wonder how adults fall for it: 
Tim Riordan, deposed president of the board of works 
and delegate to the Democratic convention, recently sent 
this sop to Mayor Rolph: an offer to put forward the 
mayor's name as a presidential candidate ! Now, it's up to 
Colonel Stanton, who took Tim's place as president of 



According to report, J. Stitt Wilson has applied for 
United States citizen papers. He has been mayor of Berke- 
ley, an American city, for two years, ran for governor and 
congress, and, of course, voted like the rest of us. These 
acts entailed his swearing he was a citizen of the United 
States, but such a minor item apparently did not smite his 
Socialist breast. Now, what'll be done to him? Nothing; 
we're a lenient bunch ; Stitt will be joyfully received into 
the fold ; again we shall exemplify the undignified attitude 
of seeking the alien in lieu of the alien's craving the 
sacred franchise. 



Some of the special writers for the big San Francisco 
dailies at the Democratic convention are earning their 
hire, but at the expense of their readers, who expected 
something amusing, interesting or instructive from them 
after all the advertising broadcasted anent their appoint- 
ment. But maybe they're sending in copy as good as 
writers of former convention antics and the fault lies with 
us: possibly we have put away the things of a child and 
refuse to be moved by forced draught literary efforts. 



In the events the American teams win in that Paris 
Olympiad, there'll be no question of their having won. 



One Littleton, former United States naturalization 
officer, is acquitted of malfeasance in office ; the aliens to 
whom he was accused of selling citizenship papers, and 
on whose testimony he was tried, and acquitted, are to 
serve jail sentences ! Acquittal and conviction on the same 
testimony! Justice treads a devious course. 



There is a sign out on Sloat Boulevard announcing the 
extension of the municipal railway, and which is labelled 
as being built by O'Shaughnessy, Ost & Healy, Engineers. 
Why not put "By the City of San Francisco" ? Why the 
private advertisement on city property to boost the stock 
of a trio of engineers ? 



One lasting benefit that would ensue were Al Smith 
nominated would be the quashing of the assinine notion 
that a Catholic can not run for president. Indeed, 
Leatrice, the benighted idea is quite prevalent. 



An American employee working under the British flag 
is killed in China; English warships subject the Chinese 
authorities to sundry indignities because of the incident 
and back up their demands with loaded cannon. A Jap 
cuts down the American flag in the United States embassy 
compound; we shall rattle a dull sabre, put saluting 
charges in our guns and be tickled to death at the Japan- 
ese government's resolution of "regret" ! We are eminent 
pacifists, nations realize it and we'll be the recipient of 
lots of these hokum "regrets" unless we exhibit a bit of 
backbone. 



Even the inanimate has its up and downs; Oakland's 
one million dollar auditorium rises and falls an inch or so 
now and then, and slips sideways and forward as much as 
twelve inches on occasions. Nothing stagnant about "My 
City Oakland". 



According to the annual report of Charles G. Morrill, 
California superintendent of criminal identification, crime 
has vastly increased in this state during the fiscal year 
just ended. Seventeen judges were executed in Russia 
some time ago because of over-leniency and other things, 
and it is reported, crime has since taken a decided flop. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Twenty-five 




MAN'S GREAT TASK 

By EDWIN MARKHAM 

Man comes from orbits strange and far, 
And he goes onward with a star 
A-throbbing in his brain. You ask, 
What is his purpose, what his task? 
'Tis to grasp firmly life's crude clay — 
Save this part — cast that part away, 
Then mould it to a shining whole: 
Man's task is to complete the soul — 
To fire it with the social sense, 
That man may build God's Providence — 
May build a highway, end to end, 
Down which God's mercies may descend. 
— American Poetry Magazine. 



DOMESTIC HARMONY 

The handkerchiefs are in the drawer — 
Yes, that is what top drawers are for ; 
The shirts lie straight here in the press. 
Come now, with your quaint crookedness ! 

You'll not find shoes upon the floor — 
No, that is not what floors are for ; 
Shoes form, on the shelf, an even border. 
Come now, with all your dear disorder ! 

How good it is that you have me 
To lay things out symmetrically — 
How wonderful that I have you 
To come and put them all askew ! 

Grace Fallow Norton in Poetry. 



BEFORE QUIET 

I will think of water-lilies 
Growing in a darkened pool, 
And my breath shall move like water, 
And my hands be limp and cool. 

It shall be as though I waited 
In a wooded place alone : 
I will learn the peace of lilies 
And will take it for my own. 

If a twinge of thought, if yearning 
Come like wind into this place, 
I will bear it like the shadow 
Of a leaf across my face. 

— Hazel Hall in Poetry. 



KNOWLEDGE 

I have known sorrow — therefore I 

May laugh with you, friend, more merrily 
Than those who never sorrowed upon earth 

And know not laughter's worth. 

I have known laughter — therefore I 
May sorrow with you far more tenderly 

Than those who never knew how sad a thing 
Seems merriment to one heart's suffering. 

— Theodosia Garrison. 



HOTEL 

St. FRANCIS 

Dancing During Tea, Monday 4 to 6 

Rooms for Mah Jongg and Bridge 

Parties on Reservation Without Charge 

Management Thos. J. Coleman 



VACATION TIME IS 
FLASHLIGHT TIME 

Renew your batteries and bulbs before going away 

HETTY BROS. 

Headquarters for 

FLASHLIGHTS— BATTERIES— BULBS 

Free Flashlight Battery with every $3.00 sale or over 
during months of June and July 



At Your Service 

Frequent trains to Sacramento. Observa- 
tion car trains leave San Francisco 7:20 and 
9:00 a. m. and 4:40 p. m. 
Dining car on 4:40 p. m. train 

San Francisco -Sacramento R.R. 

THE SCENIC ROUTE 




Every Woman Should 
Look Her Best 

Keep her hair trimmed, shingled or bobbed at 

COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

815 Clement St., 360 Geary St., San Francisco 

2331 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley 

Established 28 Years 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



a/^x 


MARY HERETH CAROLINE JONES 


^F^\v 


Luncheon is Served from 11:30 to 2:30 


* and.** 


and Tea from 3 to 5 


334 Sutter Street Douglas 7118 



"Mayerle Glasses" 

RELIEVE EYE STRAIN AND 
CORRECT ASTIGMATISM 

Scientific Eye Examination 
29 Years Exclusive Optical Practice in 
San Francisco 




960 Market St. 



Page Twenty-six 



iS®>* 



I Comments on Foreign Art 



y-^e>:? 



airs 



;:(2^in 



rr«i2>3J 



Premier Herriott of France has had but a poor chance 
of it among his friends and enemies. He has found him- 
self face to face with a strange stubborness across the 
channel and the Britishers have shown no real willingness 
to understand the French viewpoint, which is, or should 
be, in reality the world viewpoint. The Britishers have 
complacently agreed with him as to all points except as to 
continual occupation of German territory, in the Ruhr or 
out of it. The Britisher wants no occupation of territory 
and he wants the bars let down to himself so that he may 
trade. His devotion to the interests of the world at large, 
so conspicuously shown during the war, has now melted 
into nothingness but his devotion, on the other hand, to 
British industrial and trade domination of the world has 
increased as the devotion to the world at large has 
decreased. Herriott has found himself inevitably in the 
same position as Poincare with the difference that Poin- 
care usually had a united support, while poor Herriott 
finds himself with a lack of support among those who 
should be his natural supporters and, of course, the enemy 
are after him to balk his efforts at every turn. It is more 
than likely that Poincare will return to office and suc- 
cessfully finish the job once entrusted to him of being a 
good bad debt collector. 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 

NATURE SOCIETY 

The California Nature Society met in the Auditorium 
of the Golden Gate Branch of the Y. M. C. A., Friday 
evening, July 11th, and was addressed by Mr. Louis Saw- 
yer. The subject of the evening was "The Study of Na- 
ture at First-hand." 



"Then Why Art Thou Silent," McGregor? 

Home life is a great factor in the development of good 
citizenship ; yet it is impossible to develop the best that is 
in a people or encourage them to make homes within the 
boundaries of the city without providing frequent and 
rapid transportation. 

The suburban dweller, once he takes a train for his 
home, is not troubled with the transportation problems, 
even tho the trains be crowded during the rush hours; 
but the city dweller is confronted with a most serious 
problem in that he must get to and from his work within 
a reasonable time and without serious inconvenience. 

San Francisco is not immune from this condition. In 
fact, the lack of adequate transportation facilities is one 
of the contributing factors to the stifling of the growth 
of the city, for prospective residents are deterred from 
settling here because of the lack of a unified transporta- 
tion system providing rapid transportation from the cir- 
cumference to the center of the city. 

Several years ago the people authorized the Board of 
Supervisors to negotiate with the owners of the private 
company with a view to fixing a price on their property 
for the purpose of purchasing it, and subsequently they 
authorized the Board of Supervisors to purchase the 
property, paying for it out of the earnings of the lines 
thus to be acquired. 

Negotiations have been entered into; the Railroad 
Commission has set a valuation on the properties of the 
privately owned and operated company, but thus far the 
negotiations have been futile, as no agreement has been 
reached for the purchase of the lines. 

And in the meantime, no word is heard from Mc- 
Gregor. 




On May 28th the Kiwanis Club gave an 
elaborate luncheon in Vallejo to the members 
of the Club and to some G. A. R. friends. On 
y*gg?'' page 36 of this issue is a picture of the 
Kiwanis Club International, taken in front of the Y. W. 
C. A. Building. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; S7.50 per month 

Douglas 243 — Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



MR. MOTORIST 

Don't be indifferent as to your motor oil. 
Use a quality of oil — 

MONOGRAM 



Phone i.;u field 3026 



Hours 10 to 1 and 2 to 6 



Palmer Graduate 



DR. W. N. CLAYTON, Chiropractor 

Western States Life Buildintr. 995 Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Mt. Tamalpais 



& Big Trees of Muir Woods 
THREE TRAINS DAILY 



MT. 



TAMALPAIS & MUIR WOODS RAILWAY 
712 Market St., Phone Garfield 4560 



MYRTLEDALE HOT SPRINGS 

"The Wonder of the Pacific Coast in the Napa Valley" 

Modern Hotel — Geyser Heated Rooms — Natural Mud, Steam, Sulphu 

Baths — Swim mine and Amusements. 

R. ROY LEVEIRA, Prop., Calistopa, Cal. 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

WHY 

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Located in the Valley of the Moon, close to General Vallejo and Jack 
London's homes ; nolf links close by ; sulphur water swimminc pool, 
65x85. and private tub haths; fireproof hotel. If you want health and 
rest, give us a trial. Write for booklet. T. H. CORCORAN. Proprietor. 
See Peck-Judah Acua Califte. Sonoma Co. 



Open Every Day frort 



a. m. to 9 p. 



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4536 



The Most Popular Restaurant in San Francisco 

65 POST ST.. NEAR MARKET ST.. PHONE KEARNY 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners, SI. 25 

Meals Served a la Carte — Also Regular French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



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Sundays and Holidays, $1.25 


SERVED 


35 New Montgomery Street 

Phone Sutter 8668 


Opposite Palace Hotel 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Twenty-seven 



The Inner Room 

By LISBETH G. FISH 

My house, it has an inner room 
Shut from the light away, 

And oft it seems a place of doom 
Without the light of day. 

But in that hidden room I hide 
Safe from demands that claim, 

Forget the critics that deride, 
Nor crave what men call fame. 

My soul, it has a room apart, 

Where only fancies play, 
And where I hide my tired heart 

From all the world away. 

And like the calm of cloister gray 
Or cell on mountain height, 

It lifts my load of care away, — 
I go with loins girt tight. 

— American Poetry Magazine. 



A wealthy American girl was attending a social func- 
tion in England. 

"You American girls have not such healthy complex- 
ions as we have," said a duchess to the girl. "I always 
wonder why our noblemen take a fancy to your white 
faces." 

"It isn't our white faces that attract them," responded 
the American. "It's our greenbacks." 



AT THE OLD CURIOSITY SHOP 

Among other interesting antiques at this quaint shop 
in Tillman Place, is a brass carved Hanakah wall candle- 
stick with several branches, from a Jewish temple; a 
walnut gate table, old English, made in the year 1650 ; a 
wonderful antique rosewood dresser, hand carved; and a 
Sheraton rosewood buffet, beautiful enough to grace the 
most pretentious home. One can visit this place and prowl 
around in peace, without the unwelcome attentions of 
clerks, unless they are called for. This is one of the many 
attributes of the Old Curiosity Shop which endears it to 
the art lover. 



Judge — What's your name, occupation, and what's the 
charge ? 

Prisoner — My name is Sparks, I am an electrician, and 
I am charged with battery. 

"Put this guy in a dry cell." 




Compensation, General, Liability, Plate Glass, 
Accident and Health 
Fidelity and Surety Burglary Automobile Insurance 

Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR, Manager 

105 MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



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Page Twenty-eight 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 



THE CROCKER NATIONAL BANK 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 



CONDITION AT THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS 
JUNE 30, 1924 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts P2fi.055.265.31 

U. S. Bonds and Certificates 12.878,672.02 

Other Bonds and Securities 85b.2JK.91 

Capital Stock in Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco... 226.000.00 
Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit 2.656.313.80 

Cash and Sight Exchange 13.424.542.58 

S56.990.942.62 

LIABILITIES 

Capital * 2.000.000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 7.523,762.78 

Circulation 1,986.500.00 

Letters of Credit 2.858,625.48 

Deposits 42,622.054.36 

S56.990.942.62 
OFFICERS 
WM. H. CROCKER. President 
JAS. J. FAGAN, Vice-Pres. A. C. READ. Asst. Cashier 

J. B. McCARGAR, Vice-Pres. W. D. LUX. Asst. Cashier. 

WM. W. CROCKER. Vice-Pres. J. A. ROUNDS. Asst. Cashier 

F. G. WILLIS. Vice-Pres. and E. T. HARRISON. Asst. Cashier 
Cashier GEO. J. KERN. Asst. Cashier 

D. J. MURPHY, Vice-Pres. J. F. SULLIVAN. Jr., Asst. 

G. W. EBNER, Asst. Cashier Cashier 
B. D. DEAN. Asst. Cashier 



H. C. SIMPSON, Manager For- 
eign Dept. 



H. H. HAIGHT. Asst. Manager 
Foreign Dept. 



G. FERIS BALDWIN. Auditor 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
WM. H. CROCKER R. S. MOORE 

TEMPLETON CROCKER CHAS. E. GREEN 

JAS. J. FAGAN S. F. B. MORSE 

GEORGE W. SCOTT J. B. McCARGAR 

WILLIAM W. CROCKER A. G. GRIFFIN 

ATHOLL McBEAN 



Investment Service Awaits Your Call 

Our list contains the choice of Eastern and Western bond 
offerings, state, municipal, school, irrigation and indus- 
trial securities. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the issuance, purchase 
and handling of investment securities. 

Let us solve your investment problems. 

Anglo London Paris Company 

SAN FRANCISCO. 1 Sansome St. LOS ANGELES. 817-18 Calif. Bk. Bide. 
OAKLAND. 709 Syndicate Bldg. NEW YORK. 2 Wall St. 



Municipal and Public Utility Bonds 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

Mills Building, San Francisco, Phone Douglas 2244 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Pioneer Steam Carpet Beating Works 

Sewing and Relaying of Carpets a Specialty. Special 
Attention to Carpet Dyeing. Class C Fire-Proof Building. 



353-357 Tehama Street 



Telephone Douglas 30*4 



DR. BYRON W. HAINES, Dentist 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary, Phone Douglas 2433 






financial; 



PIERRE N. BERINGER 

Trade With Mexico 

If a special writer dwells insistently on a subject his 
readers usually thing him a crank and dismiss, as un- 
profitable, the thoughts he has attempted to plant in 
their brains. I think this must be true of my readers, on 
account of the way in which I have insisted that Califor- 
nia and San Francisco should attend more strenuously to 
the development of their export and import trade, as far 
as the Republic of Mexico is concerned. 

Now comes the information that of all the Latin- 
American countries Mexico has become our very best cus- 
tomer, with the exception of Cuba, which still leads. In 
1923 business with Mexico ran high onto the millions of 
dollars and Mexico has sold us millions of dollars of raw 
products. We in turn sold to Mexico millions of dollars of 
raw and finished products. 



California's Share 

What was California's share in these millions? I do 
not as yet know, but I am satisfied that the share coming 
to us was not one half what it should have been had the 
exporter and the manufacturer heeded what I have been 
saying to them through these columns. New York, quite 
naturally, obtained the lion's share, and there is no very 
good reason why this should be so. Let the Californian 
manufacturer and exporter look to it that our part in 
export and import transactions for 1924 is materially 
increased. It can be vastly increased and it should be. 
* * * 

American Inventions 

It used to be said that California produced more 
inventors, who invented more practical things than did 
people in any other part of the country among a like num- 
ber of people. I do not know if the statement holds good 
at this time, but the California inventor is offered an 
unequalled chance to let the world at large know what his 
invention may be by sending an exhibit, or drawings, of 
his or her invention to the Exposition Committee of the 
American Institute of the City of New York, whose 
address is 47 West Thirty-fourth street. The institute has 
established a permanent exhibit. 



Efficiency of Operation 

The rail lines of the United States cut operating costs 
by 820,000,000 less in 1923 than in the previous year. 
This cut was not due to lack of traffic but to the fact that 
employees are just that much more efficient than in previ- 
ous years. The Southern Pacific has shown an increasing 
efficiency in its employees, and in February, March, April 
and May successfully broke all of its previous records for 
the heaviest average gross tonnage per train and the 
heaviest gross locomotive load. 
* * * 

The Big Bridge 

A newspaper of San Francisco recently offered a prize 
to any one of its readers who would send in an acceptable 
slogan which might be used in connection with the big 
bridge soon to span the Golden Gate from Fort Point to 
the Marin shore. I suppose the judges must have received 
many thousands of suggestions, but the slogan finally 
adopted is a distinct disappointment. Any slogan should 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

be applicable to this bridge at all times. It should not be 
trivial. It should not refer to what is to be but to what is 
and it should be dignified and impress itself indelibly on 
the memory. That bridge is really the eighth wonder of 
the world and many of the writers of slogans quite 
apparently know nothing at all of its size nor of the 
impression that will be created on the beholder or they 
would not send in silly effusions to be used as slogans. 

* * * 
A Solid Institution 

People speak about the Bank of England, or the Bank 
of France, or of other large governmental or semi-govern- 
mental financial institutions, without much knowledge of 
the functions performed by the banks spoken about. The 
earliest banking institution established in Europe was 
the Bank of Venice. This was launched for business as 
early as the year 1171. The bank was designed to operate 
as the fiscal agent of the government. The Bank of Genoa 
was established in 1407. For centuries this was one of 
the principal banking organizations of Europe. It was 
the first to issue circulatory notes. The Bank of Amster- 
dam, established in 1607, had a most useful life and it 
was not until the French troops plundered it in 1794 it 
was discovered that its successful financial operations 
were made on reputation alone. Its supposed capital of 
$50,000,000 had disappeared nearly fifty years before. 

The Bank of England 

Is one of the most resourceful and powerful financial 
organizations which has ever been devised. It issues 
nearly all of the paper money for England and Wales. It 
has fifteen millions of pounds sterling as a base for the 
issues and there is also a vast deposit of actual coin, as a 
further guarantee of the validity of its notes of issue, this 
being handled in much the same manner as the gold cer- 
tificates of the United States of North America. The 
banking department is as private as any banking orgam 
zation. The bank of issue is an arm of the government 
machinery. The bank receives from the state fifteen mil- 
lions of pounds in currency, which is in turn loaned to the 
government and on which the bank receives three per 
cent interest per annum. The bank's rate of interest, since 
1865, has been from ten to two and one-half per cent. The 
usual annual dividend has been ten per cent. The Bank 
of England has ramifications all over the world. Its in- 
fluence is felt in business and in shipping circles every- 
where, and it has been one of the greatest factors in the 
development of the vast world merchandizing of Great 

Britain. 

* # * 

The British Fleet 

The coming to our port of the Hood and her sister 
ships in their tour of the world is really a great event in 
more than one way. The Hood, as we should know, is the 
largest war vessel ever constructed and as such should 
be of vast interest to us all, but the more important part 
of the event is found in the fact that the effects of having 
had this visitor will go a long way in still further dispell- 
ing the strange prejudicial feeling which adversely exists 
in the minds of so many of our fellow citizens regarding 
the Britishers. Of course, we cannot at one fell swoop 
wipe such feelings from the map and the fact that large 
numbers of Irish have not yet come to know that Ireland 
is an independent nation and that a much larger number 
of Germans and near-Germans harbor a concentrated and 
silent hatred of the British helps to keep our adverse 
prejudices in good working order. I am happy to say. 
however, that the number of sensible people apparently 
is really growing in the United States and we may hope 
that in a few hundred years, more or less, the memories 
of the Revolutionary war will not be quite as lively in the 
American mind as they are today. 



Page Twenty-nine 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been Increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

Assets $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 446,024.41 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave, and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (434) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a 
series of experiments covering a 
period of years we are now offering 
the Motoring public an Enameled 
paint job guaranteed for two years. 
Surface may be cleaned with coal 
oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is 
invited, or may we have our repre- 
sentative call? 

CALIFORNIA SIMONIZING & PAINTING CO. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 

Prospect 3418 — Phones — Prospect 3419 

What Best Serves the Public Best Serves Us 




I 

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1 *" 
pit* V. f 





FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING 
MOVING 

SHIPPING 



Wilson Bros. Co., 

INCORPORATED 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin 

and Gough 

Telephone Park 271 



The Name PIONEER 

on a box of office stationery, wheth- 
er it be typewriter paper or manu- 
script cover means complete satis- 
faction. There is a grade for every 
need. Ask your printer or stationer 
to show you samples. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & 
TOWNE 

Established 1866 
41 First Street San Francisco 







BLANCO'S 

O'FARRELL AND LARKIN STREETS PHONE FRANKLIN 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m) .75 

Dinner. Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays . $1.75 



Page Thirty 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 




PLEASURE'S W/IND 



OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

Tom Moone- 



Curran 

There pre ample reasons why 
"Romance," this week at the Curran, 
had its hundreds of nightly repeti- 
tions in London and its hundreds of 
nights in New York. The first is Doris 
Keane, star of the play; another is 
the play itself. One sits enthralled 
through the three acts of "Romance," 
and, unexpectedly, finds more of tears 
than of joy in the unravelling of a sin- 
gular story. 

Doris Keane's portrayal of a great 
opera singer, who loved too well but 
unwisely, is a revelation, especially 
when one takes thought that her lines 
are rendered in assumed foreign ac- 
cent, which, necessarily makes the 
task a more difficult one. At times her 
rendition is strongly reminiscent of 
Bernhardt, the immortal tragedienne. 
The play treats of a grand opera 
prima donna, Cavellini, enacted by 
Miss Keane, who has the world at her 
feet because of her wonderful ability ; 
the theme is an old one — love — 
though redressed in startling situa- 
tions, but it teems with passionate 
episodes, capped by the desire of the 
feted operatic star to find real haven 
in the abode of a single pure love. 
Cavallini's life is, outwardly, filled 
with the adoration of men, but the 
one man to whom she would forever 
bind herself is not found until, at a 
gay reception to her in the mansion 
of Van Tuyl — ably portrayed by John 
Steele — she meets a young cleric, Tom 
Armstrong, and instant mutual fas- 
cination is the result. Niles Welch, in 
the role of churchman, is good, par- 
ticularly in portions of the last act, 
but a certain hesitancy at times in his 
acting detracts from the enactment 
of a part replete with splendid oppor- 
tunities. If there is a minor imperfec- 
tion in the splendid acting of Miss 
Keane it is a certain indistinctness in 
her enunciation when she recites 
almost whispered lines — this is evi- 
denced by those numerous "What did 
she say" attitudes at times among 
her big audiences. The play is by Ed- 
ward Sheldon and is produced by 
Louis Owen Macloon, who has em- 
bellished it with wonderful costumes 
and gorgeous stage settings. How- 
ever, Miss Dorris' dressings are a bit 
exaggerated at times and subtract 
from her appearance. It is predicted 
"Romance" will have a long tenure at 
the Curran. 



Strand 

An adaptation from Louis Joseph 
Vance's novel, "The Lone Wolf," be- 
ing shown at the Strand this week, is 
an ultra-melodramatic picture. From 
beginning to end it is filled with ten- 
sely sensational situations centering 
around criminal life in Paris. Jack 
Holt plays the debonaire master crim- 
inal with Dorothy Dalton in the lead- 
ing feminine role. Persons of unusual- 
ly powerful imaginative inclinations 
should thoroughly enjoy it. The com- 
edy, "The Telephone Girl," is a relief 
from the tenseness engendered by the 
principal picture because of its very 
absurdity. Rudy's Manhattan orches- 
tra presents a very good musical pro- 
gram and special mention should be 
given the saxaphone soloist. Several 
interesting views of the British 
fleet's arrival, combined with the 
"World's News," add much to the ex- 
cellence of the program. 



ORPHEUM 

"Everything Will Be All Right," is ; 
this is a holdover revue by Harry Car- 
roll at the Orpheum this week and is 
alone worth the price of admission 
plus war tax. Zelma O'Neal is a 
primal favorite and "Zelma" does 
some wonderful dancing. In fact, each 
in the revue might be picked out and 
labelled "artist." Frank Davis and 
Adele Darnell, in "Caterpillars," are 
manufacturers of laughs, while Harry 
and Emma Sharrock, in a combina- 
tion of mystic and slapstick, "Behind 
the Grand Stand," keep the congrega- 
tion continually wondering and laugh- 
ing. The American tenor, John Steele, 
in a repertoire of beautiful songs, 
some of his own composition, is an 
artist and responds generously to a 
dozen encores. It is refreshing to wit- 
ness the audience's acclaiming of his 
high class selections especially in this 
period of jazz craze. Doner and 
Berkes in "Maybe? Who Can Tell," 
are clever dancers and include an 
Apache act in their number which is 
realistic, while Gordon and Rica, 
abetted by an elongated bicvcle, pro- 
vide a comedy feature. Entirely, the 
Orpheum program this week is ex- 
cellent. 



It will be remembered that "The 
Goldfish" was played in San Francisco 
by Marjorie Rambeau, and at that 
time it was one of the hits of the year. 
The story is by Gladys Unger, the 
screen version has been directed by 
Jerome Storm, and it is said to be just 
the sort of light comedy in which 
Miss Talmadge excels. In the support- 
ing company are Jack Mulhall, Jean 
Hersholt, Za Zu Pitts, Edward Con- 
nelly and a splendid company of fav- 
orite players. 

^ Among the short subjects will be 
"The Chase," a scenic drama that has 
been accorded a wonderful reception. 
It is a story of the daring ski jumpers 
in and around Moritz, Switzerland. 

On the stage Fanchon and Marco 
will present "So This Is Powell 
Street." 



WARFIELD 

On Saturday of this week Constance 
Talmadge will open in her latest com- 
edy success, "The Goldfish." 



Cameo 

Did you ever see a man in a truck 
dash madly down a hill, plunge into a 
shack, leap onto another man's back, 
beat him up and rescue the lady of 
his heart, all by himself? 

Well, that's what you could have 
seen this week at the Cameo, for Jack 
Hoxie was there in a wild western 
play called "Ridgeway of Montana," 
and he takes the part of a western 
rancher who is literally chased by a 
pampered young city girl who labors 
under the handicap of being "born 
rich." 

Some mighty fine riding is shown 
as well as good acting, and scenery; 
in fact, the writer, after reviewing 
"problem plays" ad nauseum, heaves 
a sigh of relief when entering the 
Cameo's hospitable doors, and thinks: 
"Now for fresh air, mountains, trees, 
rivers, ocean, wonderful riding, ac- 
tion and more action!" 

This play is a sort of modern sec- 
ond edition of "The Taming of the 
Shrew" written around the lives of 
cattle rustlers and their victims— if 
you can imagine such an incongruity 
— and "Aline," the heroine, succumbs 
as meekly in the end to her husband 
as did Shakespeare's "Katherine." 

The Gump family were also here, 
and we find the Gumps much funnier 
on the screen than in the pages of the 
daily newspapers. Andy, as usual, 
does some strange stunts garbed only 
in his night shirt, and Andy in his 
night shirt is a sight for the gods. 
We would recommend pajamas, if he 
keeps this up. 

Tom Cooper is as melodious as 
ever. This Saturday comes "The 
Guilty One," with Agnes Ayres. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Thirty-one 



The Second Novel 

By VERE HUTCHINSON 

The first novel of this young sister 
of A. S. M. Hutchinson, "Sea Wrack," 
was published last year in America, 
and a very unusual reception was 
accorded it by the critics. Looking 
over the collected reviews, one word 
recurs again and again ; it is "Power- 
ful." There is a sense of power in 
Vere Hutchinson's two novels, in the 
new one to the full as much as the 
first. There is drama, intensity, color, 
fire, strong onward sweep of action— 
and an astonishing sense of the long 
rhythm of life, unexpected wisdoms 
concerning inward recesses of the 
heart of man. This from a young 
woman, scarcely more than a girl. 

Her new book is romance — typical 
pirate romance, with a glorious flavor 
of the sea. A young Englishman, 
brought up by a fragrant — sweet old 
maiden aunt, his mother dead, his 
father unknown to him, on the very 
birthday when his staid old employer 
ceremoniously admits him into the 
shipping firm he works for, is kid- 
naped under hair raising circum- 



"The 1924 
Bathing Beauties 



A page of Mack Sennet's 
newest charmers will please 
your eye in next Sunday's 
rotagravure section, and, 
while Sennet seems to have 
cornered much of America's 
feminine beauty, there are 
some from abroad who are 
worth looking at, as you will 
find by glancing over the 
page entitled 



"In the 

Old Country" 



There are some unusual pic- 
tures featured in "A Week in 
America," some very interest- 
ing "Art" studies, some at- 
tractive scenics in "The Call 
of the Wild," and a striking 
marine frontispage,"A Veter- 
an of the Seven Seas." There's 
lots of pleasure awaiting- you 
in The 



Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



stances by a man who claims with 
much show of truth to be his father. 
The man is a strange character with 
wierd beauty and passion and a fa- 
natic fervor of perverted religion. A 
Wesleyan who had known John Wes- 
ley, he has been wronged, as he con- 
siders the matter, by a "papist," and 
he sails the high seas as the avenger 
of God, despoiling the ships, maiming, 
killing, torturing the persons of the 
"papists." 

The boy, dazed at first, has had 
crime fastened upon him which shuts 
him off completely, he is led to think, 
from escape. Moreover, something 
wild awakes in him ; he ruffles, swag- 
gers, kills, curses, drinks with the 
rest. But most of all he is enthralled 
with the tall-white-winged ship. An 
enormous glamour of ships and the 
sea is about the book, as the sense of 
its terror, strength and beauty was 
over "Sea Wrack." There is more of 
its beauty here in the new book; the 
author's sense of it enables her to 
communicate to her great fellowship 
deep thrills of their most secret, 
sacred enthusiasm. The plot element 
is strong, and the love story is far 
from hackneyed in its working out. 
All told, it is intrincically just an ade- 
quate romantic tale, told with an im- 



mense unspent energy and power, 
colored with a glowing imagination, 
enriched with qualities that lifts it 
clean outside what would be its or- 
dinary classification. 

The Century Co $2.00 



A Great Oil Plant 

The Associated Oil Company has 

at Avon, in Contra Costa County, one 
of the most modernly equipped re- 
fineries in the United States, repre- 
senting an investment of over §6,000,- 
000, giving employment to 250 men 
and women. The Associated selected 
Contra Costa County as a location for 
their refinery largely because of the 
excellent transportation facilities af- 
forded, both water and rail, making 
possible the maintenance of the com- 
pany's extensive distributing system 
and the prompt handling of wholesale 
shipments, domestic and export. 

The Associated's refinery has a 
capacity of 30,000 barrels of crude oil 
per day and complete equipment for 
the manufacture of gasoline, distillate 
kerosene and high grade lubricants 
for every purpose. 



We are paying A CONVENIENT LOCATION 

4T / Ol Sutter St. Just ni>»ve Montgomery 

1/ I (108 Sutler St.) 

/4 /0 SAN FRANCISCO 

on Rv*jui<>liAs a 1""9 Grant Avenue 

Savings Accounts mamnci. Third St. nnil Tnlou Ave. 



We are paying 



Savings Aeeonnts 



The French American Bank 



Commercial — Savings 



Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Statement as of .Tune 30, 1024 



75.84t.SG 



RESOURCES 

Cash on Hand and in Banks....? 1/ 

Coin and Currency In our vaults 
and I deposits with The Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank and au- 
thorized deposits pies, 

Loans and Discounts 12.698,900.94 

First Mortgage or Real Es- 
tate a n«i i roans on approved 
collateral nnd to Commercial 
Institutions. 

United States, Municipal and 

Other Bonds 3.137.810.15 

Bonds of the Government of 
I he i nited States, states and 
Cities and other carefully se- 
lected Bonds. 

Federal Reserve Bank Stock.... 

This represents the Invest- 
ment in shares of the above 
institution. 

Bank Premises 

An income producing property 
of an estimated present value 

in excess of amount at which 

carried. 

Safe I deposit Vaults 

Furniture and Fixtures 

These accounts represent fur- 
niture, fixtures and eciuip- 
ment of ich are car- 

ried at a nominal amount. 

Letters of Credit, etc , 223.603.10 



LIABILITIES 

Due Depositors .. $16,246,098.25 

Secured by our resourci 

of Credit, etc 206,651.28 

Bills Payable . . None 

•Due to Stockholders: i 



Capital . L.260 1 

Surplus . . 4M0.onn.00 

Undivided 



1.070.797.55 



Total R $18,432,547.08 



19,500 00 



505.809.88 



27.7Sl.7t; 
13.300.00 



•The amount due stockholders is their guar- 
antee to depositors and assures them of the 
continuance of a conservative and secure 
policy on the part of the management of 
the Bank. During the many years this Bank 
Ive it has endeavored to give to 
an efficient, courteous and un- 
derstanding service and welcomes new ac- 
counts. 



Total 3 547.08 



We are paying 



LEON BOCQUERAZ AL.PHOXSE BOUSQUET We ore paring 



'4/6 



on 
s:i\ ini;s Accounts 



President 

J. M. DTJPAS 

Vice-President 

J. A. BERGEROT 

V ice-President 

W. F. DUFFY 

Vice-Pres. and Cashier 



Secretary 

J. IRILARRY 

ant Cashier 

CHAS. L. EBXER. JR. 

■ i nt Cashier 

W. A. SANDERS 

Assistant Cashier 



'4/0 



Savings Arronnt"* 



Page Thirty-two 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 



Why Alameda Lost the Naval Base 

By C. S. STANWORTH, Commander U. S. Navy, Retired 



IN 1916, when the Helm board recommended the requi- 
sition of a site at Alameda for the construction of 

another navy yard, it was deemed impracticable to 
maintain a ship channel across Pinole Shoal of greater 
depth than twenty-five feet, except at excessive cost of 
maintenance ; congress had adopted a program of con- 
struction that contemplated a fleet of forty capital ships, 
drawing mere than thirty feet; political conditions might 
necessitate the assembling of the en- 
tire fleet in Pacific waters, and an- 
other navy yard besides Bremerton 
was necessary to maintain the capital 
ships in efficient condition. 

In 1917 we were at war and all our 
energies and money were devoted to 
specific war projects. At the same 
time congress approved a project for 
a thirty-foot channel across Pinole, 
the work was completed by 1919, and 
it was found that the cost of original 
dredging and maintenance had been 
over estimated. The various army en- 
gineers from 1919 until 1924 declare 
it feasible and practical to maintain 
Pinole Channel at any depth and 
width. 

Previous to 1917, the reports of 
district army engineers stated that 
the channel across Pinole Shoal was 
required for naval purposes, but the 
increase of commercial shipping, 
especially to the Contra Costa shores 
of Carquinez Strait, was so marked 
after 1917, that the reports of army 
engineers state that Pinole Channel is 
required for commercial vessels, and 
congress authorized the deepening of 
the channel to thirty feet, five hun- 
dred feet wide and a survey to deter- 
mine the cost of further deepening to forty feet. 

In 1919, after the feasibility of a channel across Pinole 
Shoal allowing capital ships to pass over had been demon- 
strated, Captain L. M. Cox recommended the south shore 
of Mare Island abutting on Carquinez Strait, three thou- 
sand feet wide, as suitable for additional battleship docks 
and supply warehouses. 

In 1922 the conference on limitation of naval arma- 
ments reduced the number of United States capital ships 
to eighteen battleships and two airplane carriers. 

The main reasons for accepting the Alameda site, 
viz: inaccessibility of Mare Island to vessels of draught 
exceeding thirty feet, the great number of capital ships 
which would constitute the United States battleship fleet 
had disappeared in 1924, although some naval officers 
failed to see the significance of the important changes. 

The navy department submitted a "Historical Outline 
of Efforts to Obtain Alameda Naval Base," and in this 
brief gave the military reasons for adopting Alameda, and 
these military reasons were introduced in the testimony 
of the various admirals, accompanied by statements of 
military disadvantages of the Carquinez site. These 
claimed disadvantages were fog, excessive currents in 
Carquinez Strait, muddy waters clogging condensers, lack 
of anchorage grounds, and disabled battleships not being 
able to cross Pinole Shoal. 

It was claimed that there was more fog in San Pablo 
Bay as shown by comparative fog horn hours at Car- 
quinez light and Oakland mole light. Fogs cause ground- 



*m~ ^^ 


l£ 


m* 




► 



occurred in San Francisco Bay, in neither San Francisco 
or San Pablo Bays are the navigational risks due to fog 
sufficiently great to affect marine insurance. Fog may 
delay the fleet entering or leaving San Francisco Bay, and 
records of fog horns at Bonita Point show over eight hun- 
dred hours yearly average, Alcatraz Island over five hun- 
dred hours, and Mare Island light one hundred and thirty 
hours. As the fleet would assemble in San Francisco Bay 
preparatory to leaving, it is evident 
that delays will be occasioned only by 
fog conditions in Golden Gate. 

Excessive Currents. The Coast 
Pilot for the Pacific Coast gives the 
average current in Carquinez Strait 
and near Goat Island as the same, 2.1 
knots. In East River, opposite New 
York navy yard, congested with traf- 
fic, but one of the principal naval 
docking yards, the average current is 
4.2 knots. 

Muddy Water Clogging Con- 
densers. When asked for actual inci- 
dents to bear out the statements 
made, extracts from ship's logs were 
given, only one of which referred to 
Pinole Shoal, and that was in 1914, 
before Pinole Channel was dredged. 

Lack of Anchorage Grounds. It 
was pointed out to the committee 
that Bremerton and Mare Island are 
the only navy yards that would have 
anchorage off the dry docks ; that the 
anchorage for the fleet would always 
be in San Francisco Bay. 

It was shown to the committee that 
Alameda was within range of modern 
gun fire from the open sea, and that 
the presence of a principal naval 
docking yard at Alameda would invite 
a surprise bombardment of San Francisco and Oakland by 
an enemy fleet using the military objective of Alameda 
naval base as the excuse for a general bombardment. 

The navy department disclaimed the idea of any 
enemy ships venturing east of our advance naval base at 
Pearl Harbor, yet claimed a military advantage in Ala- 
meda being fifteen miles nearer Golden Gate, enabling 
the United States fleet to dash out. The navy department 
claimed that if a battleship was disabled in action so that 
she was drawing over forty feet of water she could not 
pass over Pinole Shoal. If the nearest fleet action will be 
west of Pearl Harbor, two thousand miles distant, the 
advantage of being fifteen miles nearer Golden Gate is 
absurd, while no battleship so disabled as to be drawing 
over forty feet of water, will travel over two thousand 
miles to seek a harbor. 

The main ship channel when completed will be forty 
feet deep at low water with a 5.2 foot tide, which is 
neutralized however by the frequent ocean swell. To bring 
a disabled ship drawing over 40 feet through this channel 
would be hazardous. Bonita Channel has forty-five feet 
of water, but is dangerous to navigate, and a battleship so 
water logged as to draw over forty feet of water would 
roll heavily when beam to the swell in Bonita Channel. 
So the problem of the disabled battleship is to get into 
the Golden Gate. 

Once inside no commanding officer or dock master 
would attempt the docking of a battleship so injured until 
temporary repairs had been made, sufficient water pumped 



C. S. STANWORTH 
mander U. S. Navy. Retired 



ings and collisions, and while accidents due to fog have out, to bring the battleship to a better trim. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Thirty-three 



No military reason could be shown for preferring the 
Alameda site to the site at Carquinez. An attempt was 
made to show that there would be an economy in handling 
supplies for the fleet at Alameda, and the statement was 
boldly made that supplies could be handled at Alameda 
and save a million dollars a year. But when Admiral 
Peoples, who made this statement, was questioned, he 
had not worked out the maintenance of either Alameda 
or Carquinez, and his figure of one million dollars' saving 
for Alameda was a figure of speech and not derived from 
any estimate. 

Again efforts were made to show that the handling of 
supplies interfered with industrial activities at Mare 
Island navy yard. A modern warehouse for stores is 
needed at Mare Island navy yard, to replace temporary 
structures, but to refute the claim that supplies interfered 
with industrial activities, the efficient work done during 
the war crisis was brought out, also that the work on the 
President Pierce, then going on, was at less cost and 
ahead of the estimated time. 

The house naval affairs committee was firmly im- 
pressed with the idea that no military need existed for the 
construction of Alameda naval base, and that the money 
spent on the navy should be to maintain in high efficiency 



the present fleet, to build new cruisers and submarines to 
bring up our relative strength to the 5-5-3 ratio. This the 
navy department also stated was the prime requisite, and 
should be given priority over building shore stations. 



Two farmers had been enjoying a festive evening. 

They had a drive of five miles before them, and it was 
a very dark night, but the horse knew the way. Side by 
side they sat in the cart and went along at a spanking 
pace. At length they swung round a sharp turn in a most 
alarming manner, missing an obstruction by an inch or 
two. 

"Gently, George; gently round the corner, old man," 
murmured Bill. 

George gave a yell. 

"Good heavens!" he cried, "aren't you driving?" 



Brown had just been introduced to a man who 
stuttered. 

"Did you ever attend a school for stammering?" he 
asked. 

"No," replied the other; "I just picked it up." 




MARE ISLAND CENTRAL INDUSTRIAL SECTION 
Looking Northeast towards Vallejo 



Emerson Photo 



J 



Page Thirty-four 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 



l$e Romance of California Industries 



Introduction 
By REGINALD BERKELEY 



"Our business is unsteady. The mercantile business is 
very fluctuating. Changes in occupation are frequent, and 
in wealth rapid. We are speculators by our very position. 
Slow and sure plans are unsuited to us." 

The above was not written yesterday nor within the 
last half century, but it might have been, without much 
exaggeration. It is, indeed, a not seriously inaccurate 
description of the business community today. More by 
accident than design, new industries are established; 
casual experiments that may or may not be developed, 
according to the success or failure of the initiative steps. 
And herein lies the romance of the upbuilding of our 
commerce and industry, the reason why we of the West 
are — to our chagrin — so rarely taken seriously, the reason 
why the absence of a decade assures so many surprises 
for the returner. The dead come to life, their tenements 
occupied by the erstwhile strong and lusty. 

It is matter of common talk that it was the American 
who projected light into the dark ways of the Pacific 
Coast, of California in particular. Like most common 
talk, this is the child of Ignorance by Imagination, as sub- 
stantial and as evanescent as the fogs we shall always 
love, say the critics of the city of dreams what they will. 

Wondrous the changes wrought in the whirligig of 
time, and if it were possible to obliterate the records of 
history, it would be difficult to persuade the San Fran- 
ciscan of today that Russians were the pioneers of trade 
on this coast. There was a California myth before the 
days of Peter the Great, and this state of ours was in all 
likelihood the island limned on the brain of that states- 
man when he sent Bering forth in quest of "an island of 
fabulous richness," believed to exist with others in the 
sea discovered over four centuries ago by Balboa. For it 
was more than a hundred years after Bering's accidental 
discovery of Alaska before the maps showed California 
as a part of the mainland of this continent. Drake knew 
no better when he christened Northern California "New 
Albion," and raised himself to the throne as king, and 
the Spaniards always carefully camouflaged the facts of 
geography. The first approximately dependable chart of 
the Pacific Coast was the work of Captain Cook, when 
seeking the (unfound to this day) supposed northeast 



ST. MARY'S ACADEMY 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 

FOR PARTICULARS ADDRESS 

SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School Under the 
Direction of the Sisters of St. Dominic 



TUSTIN RADIO 

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SUPPLIES — Special Radio Apparatus Built to Order 

Service — Repairing — Inspection. We specialize in 

installing Radio Receiving Sets in phonograph 

cabinets, which insures a continuous entertainment. 



Phone Garfield 6972 
Our New Location, 428 Sutter St. 



San Francisco 



passage from the Pacific to the Atlantic. To him, more 
than to any other, the world owes the key to the jealously 
guarded kingdom of "New Spain." And the beginnings 
of trade in California were the work of sea pirates, en- 
gaged in a dangerous series of attacks on a "Keep out" 
sign. 

The real pioneers were, as aforesaid, the Russians, 
and their first object of attack was the coast of Alaska, 
in whose icy waters was born the infant Curiosity, the 
later bride of Devilry, from whose womb has sprung a 
host of hardy adventurers, engaged in the most marvel- 
ously successful hunt for treasure that the world has 
witnessed since the older civilizations made way for the 
one that is our boast today. 

It was the survivors of Vitus Bering's ill-fated, yet 
truly epoch-making adventure who, landing at Petropav- 
lovsk with a few skins of "sea beavers" which they ex- 
pected to sell at any old price, got the surprise of their 
lives when the local merchants literally fought for their 
possession, making unbelievable bids. The dangerous seas 
around the Aleutian Islands were soon swarming with 
boats as crazy as their desperado crews, engaged in catch- 
ing the sea otters that had for centuries multiplied in the 
gigantic growths of brown sea weed on the shores of the 
mainland and the islands. The area of exploration gradu- 
ally extended round to what is now known as British 
Columbia, and Captain Cook's trading of furs in China, 
in 1779, after his annexation of Canada a year earlier, 
coupled with his stories of the strange beasts whose habi- 
tats extended as far south as San Diego, inflamed the 
cupidity of European traders, and were the direct cause 
of the end of Spanish dominion in this California of ours. 
Madrid owed its early hold on California to the Russian 
trade in furs, the first mission having been established 
in 1769 at San Diego by request of the Spanish authorities 
to establish Spain's rule southwards in view of the north- 
ern inroads. Trade fathered the missions, the lust for 
gold dealt them their death-blow. 

It was not, indeed, until 1787, until the wealth of the 
Pacific Coast waters was known to and being exploited 
by all the other nations of the world, that our countrymen 
took any definite steps, in the shape of concerted efforts 
to secure a share of that wealth, the greater portion of 
which is now their greatest prospective asset. Even then, 
California was forbidden territory ; despite passports and 
letters of introduction to the Viceroy of New Spain, secret 
orders were issued to capture Captain Kendrick, who, 
with Captain Gray, had started out from Boston, if they 
ventured to reconnoitre the port of San Francisco on their 
way to Alaskan waters. Some trade in raisins, figs, salt, 
brandy, and a few other commodities was being carried 
on as early as the seventeenth century between California 
and Europe, but it was entirely in the hands of the 
Spaniards and Mexicans. In the fur trade, even these 
proverbially uncommercial peoples anticipated our folk 
by a couple of years, waking themselves somewhat late 
in the day to its possibilities. The Spaniards found out, 
however, that success involved the study of such problems 
as the proper curing of skins, and study of that kind was 
beneath the gentlemen they were. As late as 1792, Van- 
couver found the local Indians steering their sea courses 
in rush boats, the building of the simplest kind of modern 
craft being beyond the power of their instructors in many 
other interesting arts. Mills for grinding the wheat that 
in those days grew wild in California, were not. Today 
we could furnish the mills, but we do not seem able to 
grow enough decent wheat to keep them busy. 
(To Be Continued) 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Thirty-five 




By KEM 

"It seems that the publisher, striving in keen compe- 
tition, aims to see how many, not how worthy, books he 
can publish in a given period. He is responsible for that 
class of retail customer who now considers a book that 
is three or four weeks old behind the times." — Simon L. 
Nye. 

At the recent bookseller's convention Simon L. Nye 
in his address made a plea for "fewer and better books," 
asserting among other statements that "nowadays, and 
almost without exception, a book that has been published 
three months is practically dead, forgotten, awaiting its 
removal to the bargain table." Here is a list of "best 
sellers" for May, 1924, very much alive, and all, with the 
exception of three titles, are within the three months' 
limit, basking in their newness, the results of their ad- 
vertising, and their still fresh looking jackets. The three 
excepted have been out since January, and are still going 
strong : 

Best sellers during May: 

1. So Big, by Edna Ferber. (Doubleday.) February. 

2. Heirs Apparent, by Philip Gibbs. (Doran.) March. 

3. The Plastic Age, by Percy Marks. (Century.) Jan- 
uary. 

4. Bardelys, the Magnificent, by Sabatini. (Hough- 
ton.) April. 

5. Told By An Idiot, by Rose Macaulay. (Boni & 
Liveright.) February. 

6. Mistress Wilding, by Sabatini. (Houghton.) 
March. 

7. Interpreter's House, by Struthers Burt. (Scrib- 
ners.) March. 

8. Recompense, by Robert Keable. (Putnam.) March. 
With but few exceptions the best sellers of last May 

are now forgotten, and it remains to be seen if any of 
the above will possess a longer life. "So Big" and "The 
Plastic Age" are full of human interest and they may 
keep going indefinitely on the big sea of modern fiction. 
Many are the predictions being made now that "So Big" 
will be the fiction winner of the next Pulitzer prize. Percy 
Marks, author of "The Plastic Age," won fame with his 
novel, but lost out at Brown University because, accord- 
ing to "The Brown Jug," he "exchanged ideas with the 
students instead of valentines with the faculty," so he is 
now coming to California, where he will write his next 
novel. The students regret his loss, but California gains 
a successful author. So the adage about an ill wind still 
holds good. 

Right Off the Chest, by Nellie Revell. is one of the 
books that is different. The introduction is by Irvin S. 
Cobb, who tells us Nellie Revell lived an active, eventful 
life as a newspaper worker and press agent for great 
amusement enterprises ; that she was the first woman 
press agent in this country and one of the best ones; 
that during her four years of seemingly hopeless invalid- 
ism at St. Vincent's, in New York, suffering with a broken 
back, "she radiated courage and love — the bravest living 
creature I ever saw in my life." 

It is the record of these four years "in the world, but 
not of it," that Nellie Revell gives us in this book. In a 
serio-comic manner she tells us of these hospital experi- 
ences, of all her gifted, witty or notable visitors; of her 
doctors, who told her she could never do this or that from 
smiling to walking, and how she finally got well: the 
result, as she explains it, of "the result of mass thought, 



the combined effort of all those rooting for me." The 
book is interesting, like its author, full of inspiration for 
any one on the sick list, of smiles for the readers, who 
like funny stories and the pictures, and of information 
for any one who cares for closeups of scores of noted men 
and women, prima donnas, chorus girls, movie actors, 
leaders in national affairs and beggar boys off the street, 
who all came to visit or wrote or sent appropriate gifts 
to this gritty friend they loved so well. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can 
be obtained 



at PAUL ELDER'S 



AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 



239 Post Street 



San Francisco 



CASA DE MANANA 

La Jolla, California Opens July 3rd 

Southern California's Newest and Most Beautiful All Year-round Resort 
Hotel. Eighteen-Hole Golf Course. Tennis, Horseback Riding, Ocean 
Bathing. Finest Climate in the United States. Temperature ranges 
from 55 to 85 — Delightfully cool all summer. Write for illustrated 
folder. 

W. W. BROWN, Manager 
Casa de Manana La Jolla, Calif. 

FEATHER RIVER INN 

Blairsden, Plumas County, Calif. 
California's Ideal Mountain 
Resort — Opens June 14th 

The Golf Course opened 1921, is one of the best courses in California — 
9 holes. 3050 yards, fine grass greens. Jim Smith, Golf Professional. 
Finest lake and stream trout fishing in the state. Horseback riding, 
Hiking, Motoring, Swimming, Bowling, Tennis. Fine Orchestra — Danc- 
ing every evening. Excellent motor roads from all directions. For rates 
and reservations and illustrated folder, address. Feather River Inn. 
Write for California's Ideal Tour 
Both Hotels Operated by Van Noy-Interstate Co. 
WALTER ROUNSEVEL. Mgr., Feather River Inn. 




San Francisco, Napa and Calistoga Railway 
Napa, California 



Page Thirty-six 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 




KIWANIS CLUB INTERNATIONAL, VALLEJO, CAL. 

and Invited Guests, Members of the Farragut Post No. 4, Department of California 

and Nevada G. A. R. at Luncheon, May 28, 1924 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Thirty-seven 



Own Your Home 




HIGHWAY HOMES 

Most Desirable Home Addition of 

VA L L E J O 



LEWIS ftf SNYDER, Owners 



234A Virginia Street, Vallejo, Cal. 



Page Thirty-eight 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 




Happy are Hie men 
who start the day 



with- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1.800.000 Cups Were Served at the Panama 

Pacific International Exposition 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 




MOTOR OIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
IhenewHEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



i elands 



'Our new process does it? 



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'Tne\bice of "a Thousand Gardens" 

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1140 Geary Street ^P?* Tel. Franklin 3685 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobiles 

Oxy - Acetylene Weldinjr — Blocksmithinjr 

H. W. Culver M. Dabcrer E. Johnson 



Ei<m.hli*K»d 131* 



Kelvinator 

Electric Refrigeration 

FOR THE HOME 




Arrange for a Kelvinator equipment for your 
ice box. It does away with ice and the muss, 
makes ice cubes for your table, freezes sher- 
bets, puddings and salads. 

WATERIIOUSE-WILCOX CO. 

523 Market St., S. F. Tel. Sutter 1538 




THE BEST 
EVIDENCE 
IN THE WORLD 



PRICE 
PUMP 



The best evidence that the 
PRICE PUMP will meet your 
particular needs is the fact that 
it has been meeting the needs 
of thousands of other farm 
owners for nearly a half cen- 
tury. This fact alone should 
be sufficient reason for you to 
get complete information about 
the PRICE PUMP. 

Write for Catalog 

G. W. PRICE 
PUMP & ENGINE CO. 

Manufacturers 

Members Western Irrigation Equipment 

Association 

1350 Folsom Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



IT 
W 




N. w CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 




(Qoch car ojberafed ^ 

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chauffeurs 
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This means that you can 
dispense with all worries 
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when using our cars. Our 
drivers are careful and 
they never violate your 
desires for safety. 




Phone Franklin 217 

1629 Pine Street 

San Francisco 



w^MH^ 



Be Photographed This Year 
On Your Birthday 




Studies in all 
Oakland 
•108 14th St. 



Principal Cities of California 

San Francisco 
41 Grant Ave. 



Arthur C. Thornton 

GENERAL INSURANCE BROKER 

Fire. Liability, Automobile. Surety Bonds, I 

Losses Given Personal Attention 

519 California Street 

Phone Sutter 326 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Thirty-nine 



The Hibernia Savings & Loan Society 

(HIBERNIA BANK) 

Market, McAllister and Jones Streets, San Francisco 

Statement of Condition, June 30, 1924 

ASSETS 

l—BONDS OF THE UNITED STATES ($11,000,000.00), of the State of 
California and the Counties, Cities and School Districts thereof ($20,- 
279,765.65), of the State of New York ($894,000.00), of the City of New 
York (81,139,000.00), of the State of Nevada ($100,000.00), of the State 
of Oregon ($51,000.00), of the County of Lane, Or. ($200,000.00), of the 
County of Douglas, Or. ($147,000.00), of the County of Bergen, N. J. 
($140,000.00), of the County of Jackson, Or. ($84,000.00), of the County 
of Clackamas, Or. ($73,950.00), of the City of Cleveland, Ohio ($105,- 
000.00), of the City of St. Paul, Minn. ($100,000.00), of the City of Jer- 
sey City, N. J. ($50,000.00), of the City of Portland, Or. ($50,000.00), of 
the City of Dayton, Ohio ($25,000.00), the actual value of which is $34,364,946.60 

2— MISCELLANEOUS BONDS, comprising Quasi-Public Corporation 
Bonds and Real Estate Mortgage Bonds ($3,099,000.00), the actual value 

of which is 3,037,852.50 

3-CASHONHAND 2,863,132.26 

4 — PROMISSORY NOTES and the debts thereby secured, the actual value 

of which is 38,853,415.26 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts, owned by said Cor- 
poration, and the payment thereof is secured by First Mortgages on 
Real Estate within this State, and the States of Oregon, Nevada, Wash- 
ington and Utah. 

5 — PROMISSORY NOTES and the debts thereby secured, the actual value 

of which is 468,510.00 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts, owned by said Cor- 
poration, and the payment thereof is secured by pledge of Bonds and 
other securities. 

6 — ( a ) — REAL ESTATE situate in the City and County of San Francisco 

($2,912.00) , and in the Counties of Monterey ($63,615.33) , and San Luis tint* 

Obispo ($91,888.81), in this State, the actual value of which is 158,416.14 

(b) THE LANDS AND BUILDINGS in which said Corporation keeps 

its offices, the actual value of which is l,UoZ,U45.Dl 

TOTAL ASSETS $80,808,318.27 

LIABILITIES 

1— SAID CORPORATION OWES DEPOSITS amounting to and the actual 

value of which is — $75,445,4Zo.o5 

2— RESERVE FUND 5,5 6 2,894.4 2 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $"80,808,318.27 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

By J. O. Tobin. Vice-President. 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

By D. J. Buckley. Acting Secretary. 

State of California, ) 

City and County of San Francisco. \ '^' 

J. O. TOBIN and D. J. BUCKLEY, being each dulv sworn, each for himself, says: That said J. O. TOBIN is 
Vice-President and that said D. J. BUCKLEY is Acting Secretary of THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SO- 
CIETY, the Corporation above mentioned, and that the foregoing statement is true. 

J. O. TOBIN, Vice-President. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1st day of July, 1924. 
CHAS. T. STANLEY. 
Notary Public in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, State of California. 



D. J. BUCKLEY, Acting Secretary. 



J 



Page Forty 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 




CENTRAL COMMERCIAL & SAVINGS BANK 
Nearing Completion, Vallejo, Cal. 





The Vallejo Commercial National Bank and the Vallejo Bank of Savings 
of Vallejo, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Forty-one 



cAnother Big Ship Canal for U. S. 

By ROBERT MORGAN, In Popular Mechanics 



SURVEYS have been completed and a report is being 
prepared for presentation to the federal government 
for another of the world's large ship canals, to be 
located in California, and to connect Sacramento, the capi- 
tal of the state, with the Pacific Ocean by way of San 
Francisco Bay. The canal will be 35 miles long, 150 feet 
wide at the bottom, 350 to 360 feet wide at the surface of 
the water, and 30 feet deep, capable of floating all but the 
very largest of deep sea vessels, and is designed to con- 
vert Sacramento, which is 90 miles from the Pacific, into 
an ocean port. Out of Sacramento, on steamboats, barges 
and schooners, are shipped every year 1,000,000 tons of 
products of the grain ranches, fruit orchards, vegetable 
farms, and mines of 29 counties. This production is valued 
at $95.95 per ton, the most valuable — and the largest — 
river traffic in the new world in proportion to the length 
of navigability of the stream, which is about 200 miles. 

All this large volume of shipments has to be re-han- 
dled at San Francisco, Oakland, or other deep sea ports 
on San Francisco Bay, and the cost of this trans-shipment 
is so great that the saving in this one item alone by the 
bringing of deep sea tonnage direct to the Sacramento 
wharves will pay the cost of the ship canal in about ten 
years. In addition to this, the deep channel with the silt- 
bearing waters of many streams cut off, will eliminate the 
present expensive dredging of the channel of the Sacra- 
mento River, which has to be kept up continuously the 
year around. There are 3,000,000 acres of arable land, 
suitable for cultivation and available for irrigation, in the 
Sacramento Valley, tributary to the river and the City of 
Sacramento. Of this great area, only about 25,000 to 30,- 
000 acres are in production. It is believed that the intro- 
duction of deep sea shipping to the heart of this valley 
will bring about the early cultivation of these other acres. 
How much arable land lies idle in the remaining counties 
tributary, by rail and water, to Sacramento, it is impossi- 
ble to estimate. 

For 55 miles of the 90 which separate Sacramento 
from the Pacific Ocean, there is deep water — from 40 to 
80 feet — so that only 35 miles of the canal need be exca- 
vated, and these through soft delta land, with no compli- 
cated engineering problems, and no difficulties to overcome 
other than the walling out of the silt-bearing streams, and 
the establishment of crossings for railroads and highways. 
Under the direction of the ship canal committee of the 
Sacramento Chamber of Commerce, which is the prime 
mover in the plan, a complete survey has been made of the 
canal route, and estimates have been made for presenta- 
tion to the national government in an effort to obtain 
federal aid. If, for any reason, such aid is not forthcom- 
ing, the City of Sacramento and the 29 tributary counties 
will proceed with the construction of the canal, which will 
be publicly owned and operated, as will also the large 
turning basin and the port facilities to be established at 
the Sacramento end. 

The cost of excavation is estimated at 8825,000 to 
$1,000,000, the comparatively low cost being due to the 
soft earth to be moved and the absence of stone from the 
course selected. Much of this course lies through sloughs 
and bayous, which in some places, will have to be deep- 
ened, in others widened, and in some left virtually as they 
are today. The waterfront facilities, including the turning 
basin on the San Francisco waterfront, will cost from 
81,000,000 to 81,500,000. depending on the prices of labor 
and materials. The proponents of the plan believe that 



the maximum figure for total cost will be within $3,000,- 
000, a comparatively insignificant sum. 

The route of the new canal, which is longer than the 
Welland Canal, as long as the famous Manchester Ship 
Canal, and wider and deeper than either, will not follow 
the course of the Sacramento River, which is maintained 
at a minimum depth of seven feet for barge and shallow 
steamer traffic, but runs two-thirds of its length south 
from the City of Sacramento, and then turns west of 
south, through Georgiana Slough and into the wider and 
deeper San Joaquin River a short distance above Antioch, 
which, incidentally, also will become an important deep 
water port for the San Joaquin Valley, when the canal is 
completed. This route was selected as the best after an 
exhaustive survey of several proposed routes. It will start 
at the southern part of Sacramento City, follow substan- 
tially the line of the city drainage canal to Snodgrass 
Slough, thence down the latter channel to a point near its 
junction with the Mokelumne River. Thence it will cut 
through to Georgiana Slough. At this point the natural 
channel will be abandoned and a straight cut made into 
the deeper waters of the San Joaquin River. The low 
water depth of the San Joaquin at the proposed point of 
entry is 31 feet, and all the way down to Antioch this 
depth is maintained as a minimum, though much of the 
water is 60 to 80 feet deep. The depth off Antioch is 54 
feet, but a short distance below this place the river 
divides into several channels which shoal, in places, to a 
depth of only 18 feet. 

The canal is to be constructed in five sections of vary- 
ing lengths, a total of 35 miles. Of this, at least 14 miles 
are in river and slough channels, which already are in 
use by river craft, and will require only so much excavat- 
ing as may be necessary to straighten bends and to in- 
crease the depth to 30 feet. The other 21 miles will be in 
original excavation, but in soft earth. 

Investigation by the ship canal committee shows that 
the large majority of ports of the world are not accessible 
In vessels drawing more than 30 feet of water, and that 
considerably more than half these ports offer only 27 
feet of water. The record of bottoms entering and leaving 
San Francisco Bay shows that 45 per cent of the deep sea 
traffic to and from that port is borne in vessels of 20-foot 
draft or less, and that 80 per cent of it is carried in ships 
that draw not more than 25 feet of water. Thus it 
appears that a ship canal offering 30 feet of water would 
be able to handle more than four-fifths of the traffic which 
now comes and goes to and from San Francisco. 

The plan adopted for the new ship canal provides that 
ii( water shall be admitted to the canal from either the 
Mokelumne or the Sacramento Rivers, except through 
gates that will prevent the ingress of sand, silt or debris. 
To so exclude the sands and silt of these streams, locks 
will be required at the head of Georgiana Slough; other- 
wise, the canal will be at tide level. Protective works also 
will have to be constructed at the point of entry of the 
canal into the San Joaquin River, and estimates of these 
have been included in the figures of the cost of the com- 
pleted waterway. 

Traffic this year on the waterways which will, in part, 
be replaced by the ship canal, will total approximately 
•SI 00,000.000 in value and will considerably exceed 1,000,- 
000 tons in volume. The growth of this traffic in the past 
decade has been enormous, since it amounted, in 1910, to 
only 400.000 tons. When the canal is completed it is esti- 
mated that this traffic, both in volume and in value, will 
be increased by at least one-third. 



Page Forty-two 



CARQTJINEZ STRAITS EDITION 



^Fe Thriving City of cTWartinez 



By CATHERINE BEAM 



MARTINEZ, the seat of the §300,000,000 County of 
Contra Costa, is situated on the eastern end of 
Carquinez Straits, thirty-five miles from San Fran- 
cisco and is, as well as a city of homes, fast becoming a 
prominent industrial center. 

The oil industries have located their refineries in Contra 
Costa County, with Martinez in the center. The Shell 
Company of California and the Associated Oil Company 
have their refineries in Martinez, and the Union and 
Standard Oil Companies are located a few miles to the 
west. 

Martinez harbor provides a means of transportation 
for the ocean-going vessels of all types, some of which 
are daily in dock at one of the Martinez wharves. Any 
boat that can pass through the Panama Canal can dock 
at the Martinez municipal wharf, or any of the industrial 
wharves in Martinez harbor. In addition Martinez is pro- 
vided with two transcontinental railroad lines, two hydro- 
electric power lines, three crude oil pipe lines connecting 
the refineries with the rich California oil fields, and has 
easy access to the thickly populated centers of labor 
markets. Martinez has, therefore, become an industrial 
center. The Shell Company of California, the Associated 
Oil Company, the Petroleum Products Company, Mountain 
Copper Company, and recently the Chipman Chemical 
Company, have located their plants in Martinez, provid- 
ing a permanent pay roll annually to Martinez' other 
business institutions. 

The Bay Specialty Company, wholesale manufacturers 
of electric lighting fixtures, have their plant in Martinez 
with a trade to jobbers throughout the United States. The 
Alhambra Natural Mineral Water Company has its bot- 
tling plants also in Martinez, being connected direct by 
pipe line from its natural mineral springs, supplying 
Alhambra products to northern California cities. The 
Calac product of ciders, vinegars and apple juices, oper- 
ated by the Upham Brothers, the John Swett & Son, 
manufacturers of the well known "Swett Grape Juice," 
are all plants in the Alhambra Valley, just south of 
Martinez. 

The residential portion of the city is couched in a 
valley lying between rolling hills covered with natural 
shrubbery. Every street within the city limits has been 
paved with a permanent pavement its full width and curbs 
and gutters provided. The city owns its water system with 
a source of supply contracted with the owner of wells in 
the Ygnacio and Pacheco Valleys. With permanent build- 
ings, housing both the city and county government, with 



civic buildings that are a pride to the community, and 
with attractive homes throughout, Martinez claims the 
right to be called the "Ideal Home City." 

The Alhambra Union High School, with its recently 
completed 8200,000 buildings, the Martinez Grammar 
School with three well constructed buildings and the 
DeLaselle Institute of the Christian Brothers provide 
machinery for the adequate school system of the com- 
munity. Churches of practically all denominations are 
maintained. A beautiful building of the Women's Club 
House, on the bank of the Alhambra Creek, which runs 
through a portion of the city, is nearing completion and 
will provide another community gathering place. 

Attractive industrial sites are available, both munic- 
ipal and privately owned. The municipality owns approxi- 
mately forty acres of water front, available for industrial 
plants, at reasonable rentals. There are privately owned 
sites within a radius of a few miles of Martinez suitable 
for both large or small industries. 

To the south of Martinez lies the notable and pic- 
turesque as well as fertile and productive valley of Alham- 
bra, the home of the late John Muir, noted naturalist, and 
the late John Swett, the eminent educator. The valley is 
famous for its fruits, orchards, dairy interests and home 
attractions. The valley produces fruits of the finest qual- 
ity, the orchards being prominent factors, aiding in the 
growth of the territory and furnishing an abundance of 
fresh produce to the residents of Martinez. Almonds, 
olives, walnuts, peaches, pears, apricots, cherries and 
other products thrive, with shipments worth thousands 
of dollars annually. The finest cherries on the market 
usually come from Alhambra Valley. The shipment of 
pears alone, which command the highest prices of Cali- 
fornia fruits on the New York and eastern markets, total 
approximately one hundred cars annually. 



PLEASANT TRAVELING 

The roadbed of the San Francisco, Napa & Calistoga 
Electric Railway is one of the cleanest roadbeds in the 
state. The cars pass through a country of vineyards, 
which at this time of year are in full leaf, and the whole 
trip is a most delightful one. It is the quickest route to 
Calistoga, reaching all points in the beautiful Napa Val- 
ley, passing through Napa and St. Helena and terminat- 
ing at Calistoga, from which town the auto stages leave 
for the various summer resorts and springs in the north- 
ern part of the state. 




THE WATER FRONT, MARTINEZ, CAL. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Forty-three 




Page Forty-four 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 



SS ?w- t 


JUmMl 


,"--■ 






































m 


«*«• T 


*M 


^fyrriMi 












^^i 





BENICIA HARBOR 



Benicia, California 

San Francisco's Inner Deepwater Harbor 

33 miles inland 



Where deep water vessels from "Round the Horn" first met stages to the gold fields and the interior 
Where San Francisco Bay Deep Water Meets Uninterrupted Transcontinental Rail 

Where the Factory Builder and the Shipper has : 

DEEP WATER DELIVERY FOR FOREIGN PRODUCTS 

CHEAPEST RATES ON RAW MATERIALS 

CHEAPEST OVERHEAD FOR MANUFACTURING 

CHEAPEST POWER NEAR POWER PRODUCTION 

LOWEST TAXES OF ANY TERMINAL MANUFACTURING TOWN 

BEST WORKING CLIMATE IN CALIFORNIA 

ATTRACTIVE FREIGHT DIFFERENTIAL TO INTERIOR 



THE UTILIZATION OF THESE NATURAL ADVANTAGES; TRANSCONTINENTAL 

RAIL AND DEEPWATER HARBOR, IS THE SOLUTION OF 

SAN FRANCISCO'S MARINE CONGESTION 




CARQUINEZ STRAIT— SILVER GATE FROM BENICIA 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Page Forty-five 



MARTINEZ-BENICIA FERRY 





,j 




lie 


TfWEH 

^1 V"^*< 


> 






: .^ t| 









Going South, Turn Left at Cordelia 

The quick way to Oakland and San Francisco via Franklin Canyon 
Highway. Avoid 26 miles' congested city traffic, save 26 miles' travel via 
Dublin to San Jose and all points south. THE SCENIC ROUTE. 



SCHEDULE 
(Effective May 1, 1923) 



Leave Benicia 



Leave Martinez 



6:40 

7:20 

8:00 

8:40 

9:20 

'9:40 

10:00 

10:20 

10:40 

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*6:40 
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*7:20 
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10:20 
•11:00 



•Holidays and Sundays 
Lunch Room on Boats 



E. GLENDON. General Manager 

BENICIA. CALIF. 



J 



Page Forty-six 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 




Street Scenes in Pittsburg 



Prosperous Pittsburg 



Nestled in a picturesque setting on the rich lowlands at 
the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers 
with the headwaters of San Francisco Bay, and with the 
rugged Mt. Diablo overlooking it from a height of 3,849 
feet on the south, Pittsburg enjoys all of the advantages 
of an ideal geographical location and an ideal California 
climate. 

Served by the main transcontinental lines of the South- 
ern Pacific and the Santa Fe Railways, the San Fran- 
cisco-Sacramento electric railway, and with ocean-going 
and river steamers loading at its wharves, its command- 
ing position at the gateway between the great interior 
valleys of California and the great cities on San Francisco 
Bay insures the development and growth of this modern 
city. 

The climate at Pittsburg is mild and healthful, and is 
devoid of extremes. The mean annual temperature is 
about 60.9, and the weather report for the year 1922 
shows 293 clear days and 72 cloudy days. It is a me- 
dium between that of the coast and of the interior valleys 
of California. 

Pittsburg has fine business streets, good banks, excel- 
lent shops, modern hotels and theaters, and its residence 
sections are built up with pretty, modern California bung- 
alows surrounded by beautiful lawns and shrubbery. 



During the last few years several large industrial 
plants have been established here ; notably the Great 
Western Electro-Chemical Company, established in the 
year 1916, since time it has been running twenty-four 
hours a day; the F. E. Booth Company cannery, which 
is the second largest asparagus packing plant in the 
world; the California Bean Growers' Association ware- 
house; the Redwood Manufacturers Company, which em- 
ploys six or seven hundred men a year ; the S20, 000,000 
Columbia Steel Corporation and the Pioneer Rubber Mills, 
a $3,000,000 corporation which furnishes employment for 
from three to four hundred people throughout the year. 

Pittsburg has several first class hotels, among them the 
Hotel Los Medanos, one of the best hotels to be found in 
cities of size comparable with Pittsburg in all of the 
West. The combined assets of its two banks are $2,- 
250,000. 

Pittsburg has a population of approximately 7,000, and 
owing to the progressive business and industrial activ- 
ity in this district, is growing rapidly. It has excellent 
fire and police protection, three large, modern school 
buildings, with the best recreational facilities. On the 
whole, Pittsburg as a manufacturing or factory city is 
not coming; it is here. 




Hotel I.os Medanos 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR 



Page Forty-seven 




HidVejyou 

HEdRPIT? 



A woman was very ill. Her doctor brought a specialist 
to see her. She had warned her sister to hide behind a 
screen in the drawing room, in order that she might over- 
hear their opinion when in consultation after examination. 

When the doctors came into the drawing room the 
specialist said: "Well, of all the ugly looking women I 
ever saw, that one's the worst." 

"Ah," said the local doctor, "but wait till you see the 
sister." 



Two young men supposed to be busily employed in a 
hardware store while the proprietor was out were recently 
startled by the appearance of their employer while they 
were engrossed in a game of cards. The employer was 
indignant. 

"How is it," he demanded, "I scarcely ever find you 
fellows at work when I come in ?" 

"Well, sir, I'll tell you," volunteered one of the men ; 
"it's on account of those rubber heels you wear." 



Mother: "Didn't I tell you to notice when the milk 
boiled over?" 

Mary: "Yes, mother. It was a quarter past four." 



A medical authority says: "If your feet ache go to a 
dentist." That's all very well, but if our teeth ache are 
we to understand that the chiropodist claims the job? 



Kerrigan: "Do yez belave in dhrames, Riley?" 

Riley: "Oi do." 

"Phwat's it a sign uv if a married man dhrames he's a 
bachelor?" 

"It's a sign thot he's goin' to mate wid a great disap- 
pointment — whin he wakes oop." 



A commercial traveler, staying at a small hotel in 
Glasgow, wished to catch a very early morning train to 
London, and asked the landlady for the loan of an alarm 
clock. 

She produced the desired clock and remarked, "We 
don't often use it, sir, and sometimes it sticks a bit, but if 
it doesn't go off, just touch that little hammer and it'll 
ring all right." 



"But she says she has given you no encouragement." 

"Did she say that?" 

"Certainly." 

"She told me that her uncle was going to leave her a 
fortune, and that he had one foot in the grave. If that is 
not encouragement I'd like to know what you call it." 



Prof. Ruston — "How dare you swear before me!" 

Milly Marianao — "How the h did I know that you 

wanted to swear first?" 



Violet Vibora — "I'm telling you for the last time that 
you can't kiss me!" 

Larry Lawton — "I knew you'd give in Anally." 



Mistress: "So you have been married before, Mrs. 
Smith?" 

Charwoman : "Yes, ma'am, three times ; and if it 
pleases 'eaven to take this one, I know where I can lay me 
'ands on a fourth." 





403-310 
ONE LIGHT 



SALES A G EXTS 

WARE GLASS COMPANY 

1066 Mission St., San Francisco, Calif. 

BRANCHES 

794 So. Central Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

No. 3 Armour Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 



Manufactured by BAY SPECIALTY CO., Martinez, California 



Page Forty-eight 



CARQUINEZ STRAITS EDITION 




Central Industrial Section Mare Island, Cal., Looking Northeast 



Home of the California Transit Co. 

1919 Market Street, Oakland, Calif. 

Maintenance and Construction of Its Equip- 
ment and Modern Six- Wheel Motor Coaches 



*d 





W1H H n HM,«3 ■;«■;! 



hSZZISh MMn m| 

■ ■i 





!ir!5I 




Dependable, safe transportation. Hourly departures to Vallejo, Napa, Vacaville, Sacramento, Lodi, 
Stockton, Livermore, Tracy, Manteca, Modesto, Merced and way points, into 

LOS ANGELES and SAN DIEGO— DAILY SERVICE 

OAKLAND DEPOT, 366 FOURTEENTH STREET 




GOLDEN GATE AUTO FERRY 

Between Sausalito and San Francisco 

Offers fast and comfortable transportation for all automobile journeys to the wonderful North Bay District. The following schedule is now effective: 

LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO 





LEAVE SAUSALI' 


ro 


4:30 A.M. 


12 :30 P.M. 


8:00 P.M 


5 :30 A.M. 


1:00 P.M. 


8:30 P.M 


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1:30 P.M. 


9:00 P.M 


6:30 A.M. 


2:00 P.M. 


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7:00 A.M. 


2:30 P.M. 


10:30 P.M 


7:30 A.M. 


3:00 P.M. 


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8:00 A.M. 


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12:30 A.M 


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5:00 A.M. 


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1:30 P.M. 


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Special 20-minute service Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Holidays and such other times as traffic requirements make necessary. 

GOLDEN GATE FERRY CO., Telephones: Graystone 550 and 551 and Sausalito 50 

The scene of California's greatest development during the next decade and the two vital factors : The Carquinez and Antiocl 
Toll Bridges. 




For information regarding an investment in these bridges address 

AMERICAN TOLL BRIDGE CO., 525 Market Street, San Francisco, California 



THE SHORT WAY FERRY 



Shortest and Most Direct 
Automobile Route Between 



SACRAMENTO, Sonoma, Napa, Oregon and Oakland, Los Angeles, SAN FRANCISCO 



Save Time Save Mileage 
Save Money 

Ample service will be provided at 
all times. 

Steamers "Issaquah," "San Jose" 
and "Vallejo." 

Excellent Dining Service 
RODEO-VALLEJO FERRY CO. 

Avcn J. Hanford, Manager Rodeo, California 



PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

One mile east of Rodeo, at the State 
Highway and adjoining "Oleum." we have 
constructed a new wharf as our Contra 
Costa county terminal and have named it 
"SHORTWAY." 




TIME SCHEDULE 

3o. Vallejo— Daily Lv. SHORTWAY— 

•6:15 A.M. *G :30 A.M. 

6:45 A.M. 7:00 A.M. 

7:15 A.M. 7:30 A.M. 

7:45 A.M. 8:00 A.M. 

8:00 A.M. 

Prom 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Boats Leave Every 20 Minutes 

7:45 P.M. 8:00 P.M. 

8:15 P.M. 8:30 P.M. 

8:45 P.M. 9:00 P.M. 

9:15 P.M. 9:30 P.M. 

9:45 P.M. 10:00 P.M. 

10:15 P.M. 10:30 P.M. 

10:45 P.M. 11:00 P.M. 

•11 :16 P.M. •11:30 P.M. 

•11 :46 P.M. »12 :00 P.M. 

•Sundays and holidays only. 

Extra Trips During Heavy Traffic. 






KSTABLISIIK1) JULY 2l>, 1850 




PRICE 10 CENTS _ $5.00 PER YEAR 

California Advertiser y^H^ 



SAN FRANCISCO 



gfsM^^^M^X 



SATURDAY, JULY 19, 192 



Table of Contents 



*8 



VISIONS OF VIGILANTES: by J. M. Scanland. Criminal Con- 
ditions in the Angelic City. 

TREAT 'EM ROUGH: Mussolini daubs the democracy with filth, 
and then says there is nothing fit to rule but "force." 

O'DOWD ON DAVIS. MONEY AND THE KU KLUX: Antis- 
thenes continues to air the political views of the philosophic 
Irishman. 

CONSCRIPTION FOR WORK: We conscript for war: why not 
for fire fighting? 

WHEAT AND CHAFF: by Nathaniel Anderson: this new writer 
has been the recipient of several letters of approbation relative 
to his work. 

Soc j ety Financial Pleasure's Wand 

Library Table Have You Heard It ? 






The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

Assets $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 446,024.41 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4 J^) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Investment Service Awaits Your Call 

Our list contains the choice of Eastern and Western bond offerings, state, 
municipal, school, irrigation and industrial securities. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the issuance, purchase, and handling of 
investment securities. 

Let us solve your investment problems. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



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One Sansome 

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817-18 California 

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NEW YORK 

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Compensation 

General 

Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Fidelity and 

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Burglary 

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Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 



Travelers Checks 



for those contemplating CANADIAN TOURS 

may be purchased at 

450 California Street 
Telephone Douglas 2783 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 



(Over 600 branches in Canada) 



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Write for California's Ideal Tour 
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Opens July 3rd 

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FIREPROOF STORAGE 

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SHIPPING 



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EiUbllttiid July 10. IfH* 




TIB 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




Vol. cv 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY 19, 1924 



No. 3 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. Russ Building, 235 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, 
Oaiif. Telephone Douglas C853. Entered at San Francisco, Calif., Post 
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■ — In spite of his grape juice proclivities, there is still some 
"kick" left in Bryan. 

— We forget how old fashioned most sins are, when we 
rail at the youths of today. 

* * * 

— A political platform is no stronger than its weakest 

plank. 

* * * 

— In political discussions, we all feel free to express our 
wildest opinion, without the fear of being called crazy. 

* * * 

— Of course we all agree that to err is human, unless 
the other fellow makes the blunder. 

* * * 

— Ultimately the one who makes trouble has more trou- 
ble of his own than those for whom he made trouble. 

* * * 

— One sex of what we call the "lower animals" (Iocs not 
kill the other for love. They leave that for human beings. 

* * * 

— Did you know that South Africans like ice cream so 
well that they are making a study of American methods of 
manufacture? 

* * * 

—And that the native "flappers" in far off and remote 
Samoa bob their hair and give it the fashionable auburn 
tint with a wash made from the leaves of a wild plant? 

* * * 

—You know it was Henry Van Dyke who said that 
woman's participation in politics gave the country only 
twice as much of the same thing." 

* * * 

— Lowell said : "Talent is that which is in a man's power; 
genius is that in whose power a man is." 

* * * 

— Clemence Dane says: "1 do not believe that any work 
if genius has been produced by one human creature with- 
out another human creature being concerned in the act of 
•reation." 

* * * 

— A good part of the time human beings are doing their 
Itmost to impress on someone the idea that something or 
>ther is true when it is not. To a great extent, this is what 
\<- call "business " 



— Respective ages of certain delegates at the Democratic 
convention are 80 and 82. About time for these antiquated 
ones to take to the chimney corner, what? We wonder if 
there were any more of the same vintage? If so, possibly 
that's what accounts for the slowness of the whole affair. 

* * * 

— Students of Tokio give a demonstration demanding 
prohibition for Japan, urging that a "dry" regime is neces- 
sary for solving the Japanese-American immigration prob- 
lem ! If their prohibition enactment works out as success- 
fully as our's. we forsee their diplomats and officials in a 
state of beatific befuddlement ! 

* * * 

— That little country, Denmark, is the second richest 
country in the world, as her national wealth in proportion 
to the number of her population is larger than that of any- 
other country in the world, England excepted. The total 
population is, approximately, three and a half million. 

* * * 

— Frank ( i. Carpenter, the veteran travel writer, speaks 
of the remarkable intellectual progress of the Fillipinos and 
the growing literary production of the islands. Manila now 
has a number of publishing enterprises, producing books 
in both Spanish and English. The sale of books and maga- 
zines published in the United States and England is also 
steadily increasing. Standard authors sell best, and there 
is a healthy demand for the best biographies, histories and 
works on science, business and economics. 

* * * 

— It is estimated by the National Industrial Conference 
that property to the value of fifty-five billions of dollars 
escapes taxation. This total represents more than one- 
sixth of our national wealth, the property consisting of 
"church land and buildings, schools, cemetery associations, 
scientific laboratories and observatories and other societies 
whose activities are not for the purpose of gain." (?) In 
some states temperance societies are not taxed, though they 
have accumulated large amounts of pn perty. What puz- 
zles us is the need of "temperance societies" when we think 

we have prohibition? 

* * « 

— "Whatever out defects, there is no taking away from 
us the proud boast that to a degree beyond all previous 
experience in the whole world, we are widening the gap 
between what a man's wage amounts to and the cost of the 
bare necessities of life. As President Coolidge says: 'The 
rewards of labor engaged in commerce, transportation and 
industry are now such as to afford the most liberal par- 
ticipation in all the essentials of life. What this tremen- 
dous opportunity now held by the wage earner, if justly 
and wisely administered, will mean to the well being of 
the nation is almost beyond comprehension.'" — Saturday 
Evening Post. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



July 19, 1924 




When politicians take up the pen and 
"Treat 'Em Rough" venture into the dangerous waters of 

political philosophy they lav up for 
themselves troubles in plenty. The pen is mightier than the 
sword in a sense which is not usually read into the fami- 
liar proverb and. by its revelations of that which has been 
hidden, strips off the last tatters of mystery with which 
the politician has shrouded himself. If the soul is great, 
the pen reveals it. as was the case with the late Woodrow 
Wilson. If the soul is small and the mind is ignorant, the 
pen also reveals it. as has happened recently with the new 
idol of the cynical, Benito Mussolini. He has written a 
brochure in which he flatly takes up the old Machievellian 
doctrine as laid down in the "Prince." The doctrine which 
has been safely buried for a hundred years and more and is 
now revived by the Italian premier is the fundamental 
teaching of that text book of absolute monarchists and au- 
tocrats. Mussolini daubs the democracy with filth and says 
that there is nothing fit to rule but "force." This is a nice 
doctrine, within six years of the close of the war! Dean 
Inge, the very able Dean of St. Paul's Cathedral, takes 
Mr. Mussolini gently down the line and shows him that 
he is a poor, ignorant sort of a dictator and that real dic- 
tators like Cromwell and Napoleon had no such illusions. 
Napoleon maintained that a government could not rest on 
force; there must be "imponderables," such as honesty and 
justice inseparable from even a tyranny. One of the chief 
opponents of Mr. Mussolini having been murdered, the 
great man is no better off for the brochure which he has 
written to establish a reign of force. The noble, democratic 
King of Italy is in none of this mess. He saw Mussolini 
come in; he will probably see him go out. It is one of the 
misfortunes of the present day that men who are not fitted 
to be rulers become so. and society may in the long run 
have reason to regret the promoted proletarians who have 
been imposed on the nations by an irrational populace. 



We have been fortunate in having Dr. 
Dr. Irving Fisher Irving Fisher address us on the mat- 
ter of "stabilizing the dollar." There 
is nobody in the world more fitted to discuss such mat- 
ters. His position in the world of theoretical economics 
is of the highest. He has advised almost all the European 
governments on the currency question and has had much 
experience of all sorts in this country, for his department 
at Vale is almost, if not altogether, essential to any stu- 
dent of modern economics. His intellectual achievements 
have brought him into the closest touch with some of our 
greatest. Presidents Roosevelt. Taft and Wilson have, each 
in turn, sought his aid and comfort in affairs of state. We 
are mentioning this to show that the views of such an au- 
thority cannot be treated with indifference. His books re- 
veal the widest and the deepest possible grasp of the gen- 
eral realm of economics. His business connections and his 
weekly index figures of commodity prices on the other 
hand pro\ e him to be as expert in actual affairs, as he is 
deep and cultured. But all this does not mean that what 
he says is to be taken without reservation and that we are 
to regard his utterances on finance as pontifical. Quite the 
other way. There are certain things on which the scholar 
may be wrong and the commonsense of the ordinary man 
quite right. The whole purpose of the arguments of Dr. 
Irving Fisher goes to the stabilizing of the dollar, that is to 
making the value of money a permanent sort of thing. This 
is no new idea. Many people have it in mind and take one 



view or another on the question. We have here in San 
Francisco, an able new exponent of the same idea, in a 
modified form. Mr. David Atkins, who would apply engi- 
neering principles to the solution of the question. Some- 
how or other, however, the financial and business world 
maintain themselves under a currency system which may 
seem to be illogical and even ridiculous. We all maintain 
ourselves, in the same way. against all reason and deduc- 
tions of philosophers. Therefore, in spite of the ability of 
Professor Irving Fisher, and his rival brother economists, 
we are inclined to think that under the changes and chances 
of a modern free system stabilization of the currencv is 
not really practicable. 



After a very long and arduous 
The Democratic Candidate and at times ridiculous con- 
vention, the Democratic Party 
has nominated a man of prominence and character in the 
person of J. W. Davis, formerly U. S. ambassador to Brit- 
ain. In this capacity he was a great success and perhaps 
one of the most successful and popular of all the list of 
distinguished persons who have at one time or another in 
our history filled that position. The news of his nomina- 
tion has been received with great acclaim across the water. 
That is a fine testimonial to bis personal powers of attrac- 
tion and to his social adroitness and adaptability to a cere- 
monial position, for the British post implies all of that. 
There has been much adverse criticism in some quarters 
due to the fact that Mr. Davis is a corporation lawyer and 
i- associated in the conduct of some of the great service 
corporations. This does not strike us as very fair criticism. 
A man who reaches the place of leading counsel for a great 
corporation in these times, must of necessity be possessed 
of gifts eminently useful to the chief executive officer of 
a great nation. To have reached such a position implies 
an ability for steady application and a power of dealing 
with concrete problems, notably those of an economic and 
legal nature. To attack the candidate therefore on the 
ground of his employment as a corporation attorney is not 
only ridiculous from the practical standpoint, but carries 
with it an implied accusation of insincerity which is in- 
sulting. We should long ago have passed the stage when 
such accusations can be made against our public men. Con- 
sidering all the confusion of the convention and the injec- 
tion of so much that does not belong to such meetings, the 
conclusion arrived at in the nomination of J. W. Davis 
i-- therefore a matter on which the convention can well be 
congratulated. Apart from any merely political considera- 
tion, his candidacy is admirable. 



The forest fires which have been 
Conscription for Work raging, until they assumed very 

dangerous proportions and threat- 
ened some of the most beautiful and characteristic portions 
of the state, have subsided for the present. Now there is 
a fear that the lessons which might ha\ e been learned from 
them to our future gain, will be forgotten. Men are pro- 
verbially careless until peril actually assails them. The for- 
ests must be preserved, even if access to them has to be 
most strictly regulated, and when the conflagration occurs 
the man-power to fight the fire is not always available. This 
was so in the recent fires. It will be so in the future, un- 
less arrangements are made to meet the contingency. Out 
of all the talk with reference to these fires, one sensible 
suggestion was offered — that conscription of man-power be 
made to meet the occasion. Why not? When we are faced 
by war. even where the field of operations is many miles 
away, we do not think twice about conscripting our man- 
power for purposes of destruction. Is there any reason at 
all why we should not conscript our man-power at home 
for purposes of defense against the calamities which may 
threaten us in times of peace? Organization for destruc- 
tion carries also with it the inestimable virtues of loyalty 



I ulv 19, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA \DVERTISER 



and self-abnegation. Organization for salvation can be 
made no less productive in the very nature of things. To 

teach a young man that lie must face an enemy with in- 
trepidity for the sake of the community is a duty; is it any 
less a duty to teach our young men that they must be ready 
to face fire also for the sake of the community? Think of 
the inestimable value to any community of the organized 
force of its youth conscripted for the sacred duty of pre- 
serving life and property! If there could come out of all 
this loss a recognition of the claims of society and the con- 
scripting of youth for the preservation of that society we 
should have made a great gain out of an apparent material 
loss. 



THE NEW YORKER SAYS A FEW THINGS ABOUT 
MARKET ST. RAILWAY PURCHASE 

( )ur friend from New York swathed her silk scarf about 
her neck in the approved four-in-hand fashion, tilted her 
hat lower over one eye. slipped on her gauntlet glove on 
her left hand, clasped the other carelessly in her right, and 
caught up her swagger stick. 

"Your dotty transfer system has done one thing for me," 
she remarked. "It has compelled me. in many instances, to 
walk! Now, I come from a long line of canny Scots, and 
while I like to spend money in some directions, I am most 
penurious in others. I hate to put out an unnecessary nickel 
in transportation, when it is the fault of your city govern- 
ment that things are in their present state of complication 
and inconvenience, as regards street car lines. So, when I 
have to change from one of your lines to another, without 
a transfer. I just leg it! Perhaps to walk off my impa- 
tience at such conditions! At any rate, the walking is 
doing me good, and I have lost ten pounds that I didn't 
need. So 'it's an ill wind,' etc. But say, why don't you 
people get busy, and do something about buying the Mar- 
ket Street Railway?" 



NEW PRESIDENT OF THE STOCK EXCHANGE 

The San Francisco Stock Exchange feels that it has elect- 
ed, in the person of Eustace Cullinan, a man whose keen 
interest in the development of his city and state, qualifies 
him in a special manner to carry on the work and guide tin 
expansion of the exchange. Aside from this. Mr. Cullinan's 
experience in public affairs, bis profession, banking and 
business connections as a practicing attorney, place him 
in a position where he can be of inestimable service to the 
San Francisco Stock Exchange. Mr. Cullinan in a state- 
ment issued just after his election, promises that his aim 
will not only be to extend the service rendered to this city 
and state, by the exchange, but to instill an appreciation 
into the public mind, of the value and character of that 
service. 



— A motorist gave an old fanner a ride in his car. It 
was years ago. and the farmer, who had never seen a car 
before, was tremendously impressed. To impress him still 
more, the motorist put his foot on the accelerator, and 
for six or seven miles they tore along like the wind. Then 
something went wrong with the steering gear and they ran 
into a tree. 

But no harm was done. The farmer and the motorist 
alighted on a bank of moss. The car seemed unhurt. 

"That was fine." said the farmer, as he got up and filled 
his pipe. "We sartinly went the pace. Tell me this, though 
— how do you stop her when there hain't no trees?" 



—"How long is it going to take to get through with 
this case?" asked the client, who was under suspicion of 
housebreaking. 

"Well." replied the young barrister, thoughtfully, "it'll 
take me about two weeks, but I'm afraid it's going to take 
you about four years." 




STEEL-GRAY LINES 
To a Lady 

I give you tribute, setting it in praise: 

Your deadly eyes and hair, 
And features molded well since Saxon days, 

The will so sheltered there; 
The marvellous cool mind, so sure to draw, 

By instinct older far, 
Men to your power; and then, by instant law. 

To raise the shielding bar. 
To Another 
Strange, such antipathies, perceptions true 

Should go to waste, my dear. 
From you, who note with such an airplane view. 

Despite, mistrust and fear. 
Take this for comfort — you, so timorous 

To raise the "dormant beast" — 
The women who have most to fear from us. 

Fear us the least. 

A Comforter 

The cloud-floor moves in one unbroken mass, 
The air seems burdened with a sense of doom. 

Heigho, my lass! 
With fire and food and candle in the room, 
I know this much; that gloom is only gloom, 
And not itself misfortune. It will pass. 

On Failure 

False counsellors of old! 

I low foolishly they told 

That one could learn from failure, being bold. 

What can a man in depths behold? 

(hie victory shall teach 
More than life's failures reach 
For all their sum. each multiplying each. 
the strange power-- we fools beseech! 
In the Village 
One may live down disgrace. 
If nnl\ one may live 
Sufficient space; 
failure being relative. 
But poverty prolonged? 
Whether outlived or no. 
Life's self is wronged; 
We who have seen it. know. 

— Edmund Dorset, in Poetry. 



LOVE'S SADNESS 
\s final gentians are to one who dies; 
Or gathering bird- in changing Autumn trees 
( >r dwindling murmur of the Fall's last bees; 
Or idle blue of Indian Summer skies: 
\ last brief loveliness to darkening eyes... 
Even so. even so, to my sad heart are these: 
Your delicate grace, your love, your silences. 
Your eves' soft laughter, your quick heart's dear 

sighs. 
For O my Love, we are runners in a race 
Through meadows that we may not pause to know 
Nor pluck the arbutus underneath the snow 
And at the goal, with shadow-hidden face 
Death stands. Sleep's misty laurel to bestow. 
And shall we even know one last embrace? 

— E. Merrill Root, in The Wanderer. 



6 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER July 19, 1924 



§ioa§ 



to 



By J. M. Scanland 



Importing a Chief of Police 

THE expected has happened, but not so soon as was 
expected : The Chief of Police of Los Angeles, Mr. 
Aug-. Vollmer, has resigned, effective August 1. Several 
months ago I wrote to the News Letter that the Chief 
would quit when "his time was up!" This did not require 
much mental acumen, for the conditions were such that 
the end may have well been written on the street-corner 
sign posts. In the back-ground, through the general wave 
of crime, is outlined the thing that appears when a city 
becomes too corrupt and defiant of the law — a Vigilance 
Committee. Within the past several years there has been 
several changes in this office, the Chief usually lasting a 
year, or less. Finally, as it did not seem that anything good 
could come out of the Angelic City, it was decided to im- 
port a Chief. Accordingly, Mr. Yollmer was visited in the 
College City of Berkeley, and asked to take the office. It 
was a case of calling upon Cincinnatus at his play. With- 
out closely examining into existing conditions, or insisting 
upon certain needed changes, Mr. Vollmer accepted the 
crown. 

From the moment of his arrival his troubles began. There 
was a certain officer, who about controlled the Department, 
and at the same time was under criminal charges. An at- 
tempt was made to oust him, but it failed, and he holds 
office today. He opposed every reform movement Vollmer 
made. In addition, the Mayor and his legal (or political) 
adviser were opposed to the "imported Chief." There was 
opposition in the ranks and in the detective department. 
They gave a luke-warm support — just enough to save them 
from removal from office. However, the Chief has, within 
the past six months, removed about 100 policemen, some 
of whom, it was shown, were ex-convicts, and others were 
accused of crimes ranging from boot-legging to brutal as- 
saults on women. There was, naturally, a very strong op- 
position from the gamblers, and the criminals, generally. 

Volmer Orders the Town Cleaned Up 
When the Chief issued his first order to "clean up the 
town," which meant to arrest all criminals and close the 
thieving dens, there was consternation among those social 
outlaws. They had "run the town" so long, that they were 
at first stunned at such a positive order. True, similar or- 
ders had been issued by former Chiefs in newspaper inter- 
views, which, of course, were not intended to be enforced. 
But, when the "reformer," Vollmer, showed that he really 
meant it. his path was blocked from several sources. "Wire- 
less messages" were sent out, and when the raiders arrived 
at an exclusive gaming den, they found — nothing. Well 
known thieves paraded the streets, as usual, the detectives 
failing to find anything against them. Yet. robberies be- 
came more numerous. The police force has been increased 
by 300 within the past year, and still crime increases. The 
Chief told his detective force that it was their business 
to know whether gaming houses were open or not. If 
they did not know what is generally known, they were in- 
competent; and if they did know, and permitted them to 
remain open, they were incompetent and criminal. That 
gaming houses are still running is an open secret. 

A member of the City Council charged, in open session, 
not long ago, that $5O0O was paid daily by these houses, 
collectively, for "protection." It was also publicly charged 
that burglars and highway robbers paid twenty per cent 
of their haulings for "protection." These charges may not 



be true, but it is true that such houses do exist, and that 
crime increases. Convictions are also fewer, in proportion 
to the increased number of crimes. This is charged to the 
fault of the judges, bribed juries, and failure of the police- 
men to furnish the evidence. 

Police Force Increased, and so has Crime 

Not (inly has the police force been increased, but their 
pay has been increased, and crime is more rampant than 
before. The disorganization of the Department is partly 
responsible for this; or. rather, the opposition to the Chief. 
Seeing that their Chief is "tied," and thus prevented from 
carrying out his reform plans, their eyes are turned to 
the "star" that may supplant the Chief ; or, rather to the 
stars who oppose his plans. This disorganization has ex- 
isted nearly a year — ever since Mr. Vollmer dawned upon 
the Angelic, misgoverned, city. 

In an interview as to his resignation. Chief Vollmer said : 
"The City of Los Angeles would go to the dogs if the 
Crime Commission should go out of existence!" But, the 
increase of crime shows that the Crime Commission has 
done very little. More crime is committed now than be- 
fore the Commission came into existence, nothwithstand- 
ing the increased number of policemen within the past few 
years. No doubt the Commission has done something to 
check the wave, but it has not been stayed. Something 
more drastic and heroic is needed, and it is whispered that 
the Ku Klux Klan may find it necessary to don their robes 
and hoods and make their nightly rounds. Another sug- 
gested remedy is the formation of a regular Vigilance Com- 
mittee, similar to those that purified San Francisco and Los 
Angeles in the early days, and when conditions were not as 
bad as now. Of course, such extreme measures are to be 
avoided, if possible, but it does not seem probable. Chief 
Vollmer further stated that "after making a survey of the 
conditions, he decided to resign." That is, he considered 
the condition as hopeless after he had tried it for nearly a 
year. 

This is a severe indictment of a city with a population 
of 1.000,000 people, and claiming to be the foremost in 
prosperity, civilization, and in all that goes to make a city 
great. The figures show that there are more crimes com- 
mitted in l.os Angeles, in proportion to population, than 
in any city in the United States. And. it is further shown 
that there are more crimes committed in the United States, 
proportionally, than in any other country in the world. 



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lulv 1". 1934 



Wl> CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




By ANTISTHENES 
O'Dowd on Davis, Money and the Ku Klux 

"" VK/ ELL, O'Dowd, the Dimmycratic convintion wuz a 

m success. Oi see — Oi mane they nominated some- 
wan to run fur prisidint." 

"Vis, O'Kane, they did that, an', more thin that, the Dim- 
mycrats will go into the Novimber foight wid better chances 
to make a good foight thin iver before." 

"Thin ye think they'll win, O'Dowd?" 

"Oi'm not savin' they will, O'Kane, but Oi'm savin' 
they'll be more injoocement to foight a good foight thin 
iver before in the histhory av the party. O'Kane, ye can't 
foight these days widdout havin' the money, an' Oi think 
they'll be lots av money spint on both soides but more on 
the Dimmycratic thin on the Raypublican soide." 

"But, aint the Dimmycrats poor min, O'Dowd, an' thin, 
how kin they spind it an' they not havin' it?" 

"O'Kane. they's always min enough who'll put up money 
fur a good cause. In the first place, John, Misther Davis 
is a man frum Whall sthreet phwhere all his friends, Pier- 
pont Margon an' the rist av thim, are. Now, comin' frum 
there, O'Kane, — an' blood bein' thicker thin wather — 
Whall sthreet wont stand by and see wan av its min suffer 
fur the lack av funds to foight wid, wud it?" 

"Oi knew a man wanst be the name av Davis a long 
toime back, O'Dowd, but Oi guess it's not this wan, 
phwhat?" 

"An' loikely it's not, John, he being rich and yer havin' 
nothin'; but this Davis was wanst Imbassedoor to England, 
an' that remoinds me as how all the Englishers in this 
counthry an' over there will be fur him an' contreebute to 
his campaign. Fur, Oi raymimber whin he wuz the Im- 
bassedoor, the byes over there were findin' it harrd to till 
him frum wan av their own — so loike wan av thim he wuz. 
He wore the knee britches an' the shart coat loike the hist 
av thim. an' this counthry an' England were grreat friends 
in those days whoile he wuz over there, because he kipt 
thim that way, bein' a man av peace." 

"Rut, not a cint av money will come from the Ku 
Kluxes, O'Dowd, an' Davis not savin' a worrd fur thim 
in the whole convintion. phwhat?" 

"An' divil a wurrd did he say agin thim, ayther, O'Kane. 
so Oi guess the Kluxes as have it will contreebute to him. 
seein', from that he didn't talk agin thim. he must be wid 
thim. So, Oi'm guessin' it'll be a great foight, an' wid Wil- 
lum Jennins Bryan prayching fur Davis, because he's fur 
him now although, in the convintion, he called him a Whall 
sthreeter an' ither things, an' sid he wud niver be fur him. 
Rut as Higgins wanst said: 'Party shud come before prin- 
ciple', so t >i s'pose that's phwhat Willum Jennins is think- 
in' whin he sez he is now fur Davis." 

"Well. O'Dowd, Oi'll not wote Dimmycrat the comin' 
Novimber, because av all this money and because the con- 
vintion didn't go agin the Ku Kluxes." 

"An' phwhat'H ye wote fur, thin?" 

"Oi'll wote Raypublican. O'Dowd." 

"< ('Kane, if yer doin' it because a\ the money an' the 
Kluxes, ye're a dom fool. The liss sid av the Kluxes the 
betther. fur sich things throive whin ye make somethin' 
av thim; both the Dimmycrats an' the Raypublicans will 
use Kluxes. ar money, ar Soviats, ar the divil himself to 
git elided — it's the way i\ a ra\ public — but, somehow at 
other, iverything turrns out all might in the ind. an' the 
sthars an' Sthripes go au a-wavin'. an' we sthill have the 
grreatest counthry an the face av the earth." 



Oh, Mr. Assessor! 
With the capture of Big Bill O'Connor, the daylight ban- 
dit, we are reminded of a strange situation and one fraught 

with possible angles difficult of explanation: Lately, two 
jewelry stores, one out on Fillmore street and the other 
down on Post. were, according to the shrieking headlines 
of the dailies, robbed, the former of $20,000 and the latter 
of $100,000 — both presumably by Big Tim — and — now. the 
enigma : The sensational recital of fabulous losses was 
mere advertising, or, Mr. Ginty, Assessor, erred in making 
the assessment on these properties, or, business lately must 
have been miraculously good with these firms, or, some- 
body lied! For : 

In a sworn statement of the store stock possessed a very 
brief while ago and inscribed on the assessment roll of the 
City and County of San Francisco, the Fillmore street out- 
fit stated they possessed a meagre $1800 worth of stuff; 
likewise, in the sworn statement of the Post street estab- 
lishment, they swore they possessed but $20,390 in stock; 
therefore, from $1S00 worth the Fillmore street concern 
jumped, in the brief span of time 'twixt sworn statement 
and robbery, to $20,000, whilst the Post street gem house 
aviated from $20,390 to $100,000, and, we'll say, in these 
nip and tuck and shooting-the-wolf-from-the-door times, 
these are a duo of large jumps, eh? 

Therefore, as we sang in the beginning, the published 
reports of these robberies must have been : hokum adver- 
tising; or, Mr. Ginty, Assessor, must have been jollied in 
taking the assessment; or, business must have been bounc- 
ingly good; or, last. and. maybe, somebody told a big fib! 
Mr. Assessor, is it possible you can solve the riddle? 

— The capture, in this city, of "Big Bill" O'Connor, so- 
called prince of day lighters, after a gun fight with our de- 
tectives, will not put a stop to the leaky mouths who are 
constantly berating our police and all things municipal; 
nor will the serious wounding of two police officers last 
week when they were capturing a desperado. There is a 
class of beings who knock because they're built that way; 
they never are specific in accusing, but use blanket invec- 
tives and thus may not be liable to be held to account as 
calumniators. We'll always have them with us, for, to 
date, no antidote has been found for some pests. This 
paper congratulates the big majority of police who hold 
their own safety trivial in comparison with performance 

of dutv. 

* * * 

— That defective glands caused a mania to kill in Nathan 
Leopold and Richard Loeb, Chicago University murderers, 
will be testified to by Dr. Clayton E. Wheeler. California 
specialist, according to report! Rather, isn't it defective 
laws, and defective-conscienced doctors with a mania for 
large fees, that are the contributing cause in some cases? 



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^^t^ 334 SUTTER STREET Doughu7ll8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 19, W24 



s g 

Wheat and Chaff 1 



By Nathaniel Anderson 



gssswsssKsa 



SENATOR WALSH of Montana, said in his speech on 
assuming permanent chairmanship of the Democratic 
national convention, speaking of the Republican adminis- 
tration that "The new President was surrounded by a group 
of mercenaries, whose sinister purpose he was, from his 
kindly nature, loathe to suspect and. for one reason or an- 
other, unable to discern." Senator Walsh's language is 
mild. Evidently he is kindly, too. But he went after those 
men not long before, and he said further in his speech at 
the convention. "What a galaxy! Forbes, Fall. Daugherty. 
less Smith. Mannington, Felder. Darden, Kramer, with 
Roxie Stinson and Gaston B. Means in the background." 

As to this Means, he has been accused of a great deal 
of viciousness in his methods of procedure as a spy in the 
department of justice; he justified his name, using what- 
ever "means" at hand, the accusations run. whatever means 
he could invent to pry into secret papers of no matter whom. 
to "get something'* on somebody, not much difference who 
it was. Mr. Walsh's committee of investigation, congress and 
the Democratic party, have been reviled for using this man 
as a witness in rooting out the truth of the oil mess. Means. 
who by the way has since been sentenced to a term in jail, 
for unlawful acts, in a liquor deal we believe, was too low 
a person from whom to extract facts that might reflect on 
the character of others high-placed, but he had been good 
enough to hold a position that gave him the nation's sanc- 
tion to use his dubious methods of wrecking careers as 
secret service agent of the government. 

After all is over and a new administration gets in. or the 
old one stays there, it will be quite all right for the bal- 
ance of us poor human mortals if the like of the whole 
affair does not happen again ; and if they — meaning one 
party or another — lower the taxes and the price of goods, 
or lay out a way to make it easier to get the wherewithal 
to reach the higher cost of articles, or the lower purchas- 
ing price of the dollar — whatever it is. 
* * * 

— It is not necessary to read the older history of the 
Jews to wonder why there is prejudice against them ; nor 
must we stop to think how silly it is that they are pursued 
with hatred by many who are their very namesakes. Doubt- 
lessly these persons think themselves hundred per cent 
Christian, as well as hundred per cent American, but they 
forget that to be the former they must believe in the rich 
blood of the Hebrew, considering they took for their re- 
ligious leader a son of their kings. 

To be discussing this subject at all in the year l'>24 is an 
astounding fact, because the Jews, to tell the truth, are 
really greatly confused with other races in this country; 
thev are part of its higher social scale as well as of the 
masses. They mixed with the aristocracy of the nation 
before it became a republic. They are indissolubly of the 
nation whether intermarried with other people or not. 

It is odd to read the names existing in the social scale 
of the early days showing how naturally they were then 
accepted, and at the same time scan the daily papers to- 
day to learn the Jews are railed against as they were way 
back in the middle asjes. 

The "Republican Court" mentions many Jewish names, 
showing that the descendants of Abraham were Americans 
by right long ago, mixing with the best of their country- 
men, who submitted them to no religious test. There was 
the beautiful and witty Miss Franks, of Philadelphia, and 
her sisters Abigail and Phila, the latter, at a guess, named 
after her city, the first capital of the American country. 



These girls all married English army officers, but there were 
others who did not. Then the story of Haym the Jew is 
apropos. They say he lent the revolutionary forces sixty 
million dollars, none of which he ever got back. 

— Now that we have the word "normalcy" instead of 
normal conditions. Ave wonder if it was invented because 
the politicians were tired of promising better times in two 
words. What do they mean by normalcy — is it anv good? 
It's a rum noun to say. and must we also follow the other 
fellow who says "but it don't mean anything"? Just to 
talk from neutral ground as from one who only wants less 
taxes and generally an easy way of existing with honest 
effort, let no names of parties be mentioned in repeating 
the accusation that "Amid all this deceptive cry of econ- 
omy let it be remembered that this (name omitted) party. 
during its less than four years of control, has expended 
more than $''.052,000,000 more than did the I omitted) ad- 
ministration during the whole five years immediately pre- 
ceding the war." No doubt, in a few years more, whoever 
handles the country's money, after we have been duly ca- 
joled with the juggle of figures, by the administration or- 
dained for the next accusation, we shall be enlightened 
with another long row of figures that will make us ask, 
as Flagstaff queries, about Honour: "What is the word 
Normalcy?" Let us hope we shall not be compelled to 
get self-satisfaction, as the fat knight does in answering 
himself, saying. "Pouf — air!" 

* * * 

— On June 6th a news item read that Bryan decided for 
Mc \diMi. but strange to say. the Democratic convention is 
over, and Mr. McAdoo is not the Bourbons' candidate for 
President of the states united; and if he had been, what 
with the Commoner going ' round the country making 
speeches for him. what with his other handicaps concern- 
ing oil. Doheny. big fees, and not a very gratifying record 
as administrator, he surely would never have been the 
choice of the populace. Now comes Dudley Field Malone 
with a letter to Mr. William J. Bryan saying that for the 
sake of all concerned, as well as for himself ( Bryan), Mr. 
McAdoo's champion should walk out of the Democratic 
party, and leave it alone. He ought to let "the people" 
alone, also. 

— Headline says, "Italy Premier Reform Speech Brings 
Cheers." The dictator of Italy, whose absolute power is 
waning, is liable to entirely lose his grip on the country 
on account of the rather awkward position he has made 
for himself. He promises a constitutional government, and 
says he will check all illegally assumed and superimposed 
authority of the Fascist! — his own party, whose members 
carried him in triumph to the premiership on their should- 
ers. Mow is he going to curb his very own, who decreed. 
almost at the point of the sword, that they shall rule with 
him at their head more than as the head of the govern- 
ment? When they misbehave themselves how can he keep 
the rest of the people on his side and have their backing 
since he has later found it necessary to decree against too 
much criticism of his government by the newspapers? 



— Lawyers, it seems, are soldiers of fortune. They fight 
here and there, as lie their interests. They are mercen- 
aries by training if not by instinct. Perhaps they feel when 
all is done, that is. when they are in their old age. that 
justice has been averaged up 1>\ the higher Magistrate, but 
it is going a long way when one of their number turns 
author to write a book that the testimony of alienists is 
worthless, and then switches hack to his other profession 
of lawyer to defend for a large fee a couple of murderers 
on the hope of freeing them as insane by the testimony ol 
alienists. It's beinsr done. 



July 19, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 






— The squire was walking through the village one day, 
wearing a very shabby coat, when he met a friend. 

"Surely you are ashamed to be seen in such a dreadful 
coat ?" said the friend. 

"Certainly not." replied the squire. "Ever) body knows 
me here." 

A week later the squire was in Birmingham, still wear- 
ing the old coat, when he chanced to meet his friend, who 
again commented upon his untidy appearance. 

"What does it matter?" was the reply. "Nobody knows 
me here." 

* * * 

— An old negro living in Memphis was taken ill and called 
a physician of his own race to prescribe for him. But the 
old man did not seem to be getting" any better, and finally 
a white physician was called. 

Soon after arriving he felt the negro's pulse for a mo- 
ment and then examined his tongue. "Did the other doc- 
tor take your temperature?" he asked his patient kindly. 

"I don't know, sah," he answered feebly. "I hadn't missed 
anything but my watch as yet, boss." 

* * * 

— The only son had just announced his engagement. 
"What? That girl! She squints!" remarked his mother. 
"She has absolutely no style," added his sister. 
"Red-headed, isn't she?" queried his aunt. 
"I'm afraid she's fidgety," said grandma. 
"She hasn't any money," put in his uncle. 
"She doesn't look strong!" exclaimed his first cousin. 
"She's stuck-up!" asserted his second cousin. 
"She's an extravagant thing!" interposed his third cousin. 
"Well, she's got one redeeming feature," said the son, 
thoughtfully. 

"And what's that?" asked the family in chorus. 
"She hasn't any relations." was the quiet reply. 

— A spiritualist, who also was something of an orator, 
visited a town where a skeptical scientist lived, and deliv- 
ered a lecture one afternoon, the lecturer's desire being to 
convert the scientist to his belief. The audience was large. 
including the scientist, who had attended by special invi- 
tation. 

The next day the spiritualist called on the scientist with 
hope that his effort had been successful. "What did you 
think of my lecture?" he asked. 

"Well," replied the scientist, "1 couldn't sleep all last 
night, and I lay it to your talk." 

The spiritualist was highly flattered. "1 knew my ar- 
gument would make you think," he said. "Is it not SO? 

"I am not so certain about that. Whenever I sleep dur- 
ing the day 1 cannot sleep at night." 

* * * 

— Lucy had been accustomed to romp about in her py- 
jamas with a little playmate before going to bed, but the 
new nurse did not believe in that sort of thing. 

"It's not proper for tiny girls to be seen in their pyjamas." 
she said, "and you must tell Ivy so." 

When Ivy, from the adjoining flat, knocked on the door 
that evening and called out: "Can 1 come in. Lucy?" Lucy 
answered, sadly : — 

"No; nurse says I'm not to be seen in my 'jamas." 

Then there was a second of hast) but evidently deep 
thought on the part of Lucy. 

"It's all right now. Ivy. I've got them off. You tan 
turn in," she announced, brightly. 



— Jones was coming for the first time to see how his 
worthless son. who had been sent out on a farm to work, 
was behaving himself. He met the owner of the farm and 
immediatel) became anxious to learn whether or not his 
son had proved a success. His first question was: 

"1 low's the boy gettin' along?" 

"\\ ell." said the farmer, "he broke two spade handles 
yesterday and one today." 

"What, workin' so hard?" 

"No, lcanin' on 'em." 



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10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 19, 1924 






(nNANOAp 



By P. N. Beringer 

VERY few of us are aware of the fact that the Bank of 
France is owned by the people of the country and that 
of the citizens of France most of them own a few shares 
of stock and that this is one of the most potent reasons 
why France is so very strong and why no matter how hard 
a struggle is made to depreciate the franc, the bank has no 
difficulty in holding up the value. Ever since the days of 
Napoleon the Great the bank has stood as the strongest 
of all governmental institutions as against the disintegrat- 
ing influence of radicalism. 

* * * 

Democratic Nominations 

The democratic party, after a long session in convention. 
has nominated its ticket for the presidency and the vice- 
presidency. Those nominated are fine Americans. The re- 
publicans have nominated their ticket and in no wise, so 
far as has come to light, are the nominees deficient. Both 
parties have named respectable and tried men. It is not 
often that such conditions do exist and no party man or 
simple citizen has any reason for worry over what may be 
the result of the election. Charges will be made against 
the candidates and as to their probable policies after elec- 
tion, basing these charges on their previous business affil- 
iations. The democratic candidate, for instance, has already 
incurred the malice of the Hearst papers and is accused of 
being "tainted" by Wall Street. On the other hand, the 
republican candidates are supposed to have been smeared 

with oil in the tea-pot affairs. 

* * * 

Tainted Candidates 

As a matter of fact, it is probably true as can be that 
neither of the presidential candidates is tainted in any re- 
spect. Mr. Davis is accused of having, at some time in the 
past, represented Wall Street parties in a law suit. He is 
also accused of having acted as attorney for labor unions 
and of having acted in the same capacity in the defense in 
court of certain radicals. So. those people who build their 
political convictions on gossip may therefore take their 
choice as to the political taint they may favor most. 

But, the country is safe. 

* * * 

Postal Business 

The San Francisco Post Office operates 24 regular sta- 
tions and 56 contract stations. It is the central accounting 
office for 14,449 third and fourth class post offices in the 
state of California. The motor vehicle department handling 
the city transportation of mails employs a total of 65 in 
the operation of its fleet of 86 vehicles. It operates 35 Fords. 
17 Commerce, and 30 Denby trucks. The office has. at the 
present time, a force of 834 regular clerks employed, 495 
regular carriers, augmented by the part time service of 107 
substitute clerks and 107 substitute carriers. The post- 
master, Mr. James E. Power, has shown a great capacity 

as an executive ever since taking office. 

* * * 

Trade and Shipping 

The Matsoh Navigation Company will have, when the 
vessel now being built by the William Cramp and Sons 
Ship and Engine Building Co., at Philadelphia, is completed, 
the largest, fastest and finest appointed vessel on the Pa- 
cific for the Hawaiian run. The contract is the most im- 
portant placed in recent years. She will have a 76 foot beam 
and will be 578 feet in length. The passenger carrying ca- 
pacity will be of 600 first class and this together with the 



crew will make about 850. The speed will be about 21 knots 
and she will make the trip between this port and Honolulu 

in four and one half days. 

* * * 

Appropriations 

It is of interest to know that Uncle Sam has not forgotten 
us in the matter of expenditure of moneys for improve- 
ment of our rivers and harbors but, at the same time. I 
regret that the amounts are not larger. For instance, San 
Francisco Harbor will have $300,000; Oakland $350,000; 
San Pablo Bay and Mare Island Strait, $200,000; Suisun 
Bay Channel. $13,000; Petaluma Creek, $37,000; San Rafael 
Creek. $30,000; Crescent City Harbor. $45,000; Novo Har- 
bor, $500; San Joaquin River. $26,000; and Sacramento 
River. $95,000, and all of which goes to show that some of 
the work that is absolutely necessary to be done will have 

to be left undone. 

* * * 

Our Rivers 

Last week's issue of the SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 
LETTER showed conclusively the importance of the Sac- 
ramento and the San Joaquin rivers to the rest of the state 
and how much of the state depended upon their develop- 
ment for its future prosperity. Anyone, after reading that 
issue of this paper will quite naturally wonder at the small- 
ness of the appropriation for the improvement of the Sac- 
ramento or the San Joaquin rivers. This should indicate 
to the San Francisco resident, or any of those living and 
doing business in any of the cities in the bay district me- 
tropolitan area, the necessity of the strongest kind of team 
work for the purpose of obtaining the right kind of ap- 
preciation as to the work necessary to be done on the Sac- 
ramento and the San Joaquin rivers in the near future. Our 
welfare depends on these improvements to just as impor- 
tant an extent as does that of the agricultural and indus- 
trial interests such improvements will serve on the rivers 

named. 

* * * 

Insurance 

The friends of W. A. McKee. who for so long a time was 
connected with the automobile insurance department of the 
Roval, Queen and Newark office, are rejoicing in the fact 
that he is now the special agent for the department for the 
bav counties 



OFFICES 

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A Strictly First-Class Office Building 

Agent Room 411 



Municipal and Public Utility BONDS 

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NEW YORK 



July 19, 1924 
It is something to be 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



proud of tu be something mure 
than just a successful business man. and to have ideas that 
while business-like are. when put into practical use of a 
great value to the country. Mr. William B. Joyce, the chair- 
man of the National Surety Company, is advocating the 
creation of a two million dollar national honesty campaign 
fund to check the present crime wave. He wishes to ex- 
tend and make nation-wide a campaign of "honest courses" 
in the public schools throughout the United States. The Na- 
tional Surety has been conducting just such a campaign 
ior the last two years. Its activities have naturally been 
hunted on account of the expense. The National Surety 
Company has issued a text book on the "Practical Wisdom 
of Honesty." 

* * * 

Increase in Farm Values 

San Joaquin County gives one an idea of how much farm 
values have been enhanced in a very short time. The county 
today is assessed for nearly a million dollars more than i't 
was last year, and this advance has been mainly in lands 
devoted to asparagus growing. Of course, a corresponding 
increase in values is shown elsewhere. 

* * * 

Pacific Mutual 

The Pacific Mutual News for July is one of the very best 
magazines ever issued by this most enterprising company. 
Its articles and illustrations are of the most illuminating 
kind and the magazine would be an ornament to any li- 
brary and from it the individual may glean much useful 
knowledge not only as to insurance but as to general tonics 

* * * ' " 

Safety First 

According to Isaiah Hale, the Safety Superintendent of 
the Santa Fe, if the automobile drivers would observe a 
few simple rules the number of accidents would be greatly 
reduced in number. He advocates the following:— "Slow 
down when approaching a railroad crossing. A train can- 
not be stopped in a few feet while an automobile can. Look 
both ways and listen. Be more careful when there are two 
or more tracks. Take the safe course. In case of doubt, 
stop before reaching the track." 

* * * 

Giant Kiln Shipped 

One of the most unusual freight shipments ever handled 
in the West was recently moved by the Southern Pacific 
from Los Angeles to Lompoc, California. The novel Cargo 
consisted of a huge kiln. 125 feet in length and weighing 
175 tons. A special train of six flat cars was used to trans- 
port the shipment. The kiln is to be used in burning 
Keiselguhr or diatomaceous earth used in the manufacture 
of potter) . 



Comments on Foreign Affairs 

THI-: parley at Paris between MacDonald and Herriott 
has had no visible effect except to strengthen Herriott's 
position in France and weaken the English Premier's, as 
regards the rest of the world. No French Premier may turn 
against a solid constituency unless he courts political de- 
struction. And, as far as "the policy in France regarding 
Germany generally or the Ruhr in particular is concerned, 
there is but one opinion. 

Far away in Brazil there is a revolution which had in- 
ception in Sao Paolo and then attempted to reach Santos. 
A great many have been killed on both sides. A cable des- 
patch says that more than six thousand have been killed in 
the bombardments that have been going on. The effect in 
this country, which uses most of the coffee grown near 
Sao Paolo and Santos, is shown in an enhanced price of 
coffee. Coffee men here in San Francisco do not place much 
belief in the stories that reach us as to the gravity or the 
extent of the revolution. So far there has been very little 
information of any kind reaching this country and giving 
us any idea of the causes that have been responsible for 
the armed uprising. It is well for the American to remem- 
ber that Brazil is a vast country, and a well governed one, 
and that a revolution in Sao Paolo does not mean that 
much discontent or revolutionary feeling exists in the 
country generally. 

Mexico is making rapid progress to a regeneration and 
this is showing itself by a general spread of the school 
system of the country and by the aggressive policies adopt- 
ed by the government through its consular and business 
agents abroad. The government has returned to the poli- 
cies started by Diaz with a view to building up the coun- 
try internally and externally. Much, of course, depends 
on the man who will now sit in the presidential chair. 



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Herb Co.. Ulfi Market St., San Francisco.— Ad- 
vertisement. 



£l«tluA^ 191* 



Kelvinator 

Electric Refrigeration 

FUR.THE HOME 




Arrange for a Kelvinator equipment for your 
ice box. It does away with ice and the muss, 
makes ice cubes for your table, freezes sher- 
bets, puddings and salads. 

WATERHOlSEWILCOX CO. 
523 Market St. S. F. Tel. Sutter 1938 



12 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 19, 1924 




BUSY CUPID 

MISS BETTY SMITH, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Clay Smith of this city, and Mr. John Stuart Hardin ot Bal- 
timore and Atlanta were married last Friday in the East. The 
news comes as a surprise to the friends of the bride as no 
engagement announcement had been made. Miss Smith and 
her parents went East a fortnight ago and told no one of the 
approaching marriage. The wedding is the result of a ro- 
mance which began a year ago when Miss Smith was visiting 
in Philadelphia and Baltimore. The ceremony was held at 
Belle Terre, the estate of Mr. and Mrs. Percy L. Neel, at 
Merion, Pennsylvania. Miss Kathryn Masten of this city and 
Miss Sarah Neel of Philadelphia were the bride's only atten- 
dants. Mr. Howell Jackson of New York was the best man. 
Mr. Hardin is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Melville Coxe Hardin 
of Atlanta. He served as a first lieutenant overseas during 
the war. He is a graduate of Vanderbilt University. The 
young couple will reside in Philadelphia. 
MR. AND MRS. JAMES H. ROURKE announce the marriage of 
their daughter. Miss Mary Eileen Rourke, to Marshall A. Ball, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Ball of Longridge Road, Oakland. 
Both are well known in San Francisco. The Rourke-Ball wed- 
ding took place July 9, the ceremony being read at St. Francis 
de Sales Church across the bay. Several hundred friends from 
both sides of the bay attended the wedding. 
MISS MARGARET WEBSTER, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred- 
erick D. Webster of this city, will be married to William 
Norris King, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick King, July 23, 
at the Webster home in town. It is to be a small, simple 
wedding. Several parties that had been planned have been 
cancelled owing to Miss Webster's indisposition. Meantime 
the engaged couple are busy furnishing their home on Cali- 
, fornia and Powell street. 
MISS KATHRYN ANN SHATTUCK, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ar- 
thur E. Shattuck of Berkeley, and Mr. Adrian Wilbur Van 
Brunt of New York, will be married on Friday afternoon. 
August 1, at 4 o'clock. The ceremony will be held at the 
bride's home. The. approaching marriage will ally two of 
the oldest families in America. The bride's family dates back 
1 to William Shattuck, who was among the English Puritan 
emigrants to first colonize Massachusetts in the vicinity of 
!i Boston in 1630. The bride's great-grandfather, the late Judge 
D. O. Shattuck, a California pioneer of the days of "forty- 
nine." was the first judge of the Superior Court in San Fran- 
cisco in 1851. 

LUNCHEONS 
MRS. ROBERT MILLER entertained at an informal luncheon 
Tuesday at the Burlingame Country Club. Mr. and Mrs. Miller 
are spending a month in Burlingame at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Bernard W. Ford, the latter of whom left the close 
of last week for a trip to Santa Barbara. 
MR. AND MRS. LAWRENCE McCREERY. who returned last 
week from Honolulu, gave a luncheon Sunday at the Burl- 
ingame Country Club. 
MRS. NION TUCKER gave a luncheon last Friday at her home 
in Burlingame complimenting Mrs. William H. La Boyteaux 
and Mrs. George Barr Baker. 
MISS RUTH KEARNY is in California from her home in Paris, 
visiting her various relatives. She was the guest of honor at 
a recent luncheon given by her cousin, Mrs. Lewis Hanchett. 
and another party given by the Misses Margery and Nancy 
Davis. Miss Kearny will return home in the early fall. 
MRS. CHARLES FARQUHARSON had a few friends in Tues- 
day for luncheon and bridge as a compliment to Mrs. W. H. 
La Boyteaux of New York, who is here for the summer. Mrs. 
Farciuharson's party was at her apartment at Stanford Court. 
MISS FRANCESCA LEERING will give a luncheon party on 
Monday, July 21, as a farewell to Miss Frances Stent, who 
is accompanying her parents abroad this month. The Stents 
leave on July 21. 
MISS JOSEPHINE GRANT, while at Santa Barbara with her 
guest, Miss Luiscita Wood, was entertained by Mrs. Horace 
D. Pillsbury, who gave a luncheon for the girls at the Monte- 
cito Country Club. 
MISS EDNA TAYLOR entertained at an informal luncheon on 
Sunday at the Menlo Country Club. In her party were her 
fiance. Mr. Bliss Rucker, Mr. and Mrs. Jerd Sullivan and one 
or two others. 
MRS. WILLIAM BOWERS BOURN entertained at a luncheon last 
Thursday at "Filoli" in San Mateo in honor of Mrs. Philip 
Van Home Lansdale. who is spending the summer in Burl- 
ingame. 



MRS. JOHN KITTLE, who has been entertained at a number of 
parties since her arrival in Ross from her wedding trip, was 
the guest of honor at a buffet luncheon given last week by 
Mrs. Millen Griffith at her home. 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE NEWHALL gave a large picnic one 
day last week at Lake Tahoe. where they have an attractive 
summer home. The guests included other members of the 
group of summer residents, among them the Moffltts, Popes. 
Hobarts and Drums. 

MRS. GEORGE BARR BAKER of New York was hostess at a 
large luncheon at the Burlingame Club last Sunday when she 
entertained for Miss Doris Keane, the actress, and Miss Gladys 
Unger, the playwright and author of "The Goldfish." 

MRS. PARMER FULLER entertained at an informal luncheon 
at her home in Burlingame, complimenting Miss Alice Ayer. 
Miss Ayer, with her sister and her mother, Mrs. Harold Aver, 
arrived recently on the peninsula for the summer months 
and are established in the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Leigh 
Sypher in El Cerrito. 

HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

MRS. ROBERT HAYES SMITH, Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran and 

Mrs. James Jackman made an attractive group at luncheon 

Monday. 
MRS. J. D. GRANT. Mrs. Samuel Knight, Mrs. Dixwell Hewitt, 

Mrs. Gerald Rathbone and Mrs. Eugene Murphy lunched 

tete-a-tete. 
MISS JOSEPHINE GRANT had as her guest Miss Dorothy Wood. 

daughter of Governor General Leonard Wood of Manila. 
MRS. ERNEST F. FOLGER Mrs. Dalton Mann, Miss Elena Fol- 

ger and Mrs. Stuart Haldorn formed another group. 
MISS AILEEN McINTOSH. Miss Mary Julia Crocker. Miss Jane 

Carrigan and Miss Alice Requa were a group of debutantes 

at lunch Monday. 

niiJDGK 
MRS. FRANK HOWARD ALLEN had some of her friends in 

for the afternoon at her home in Ross Tuesday, bridge and 

tea offering a pleasant afternoon. 

TK.XS 

MR. AND MRS. Harry N. Stetson, who have lived abroad for the 
past two years, have secured an attractive apartment near 
the Palace of the President, which was formerly occupied by 
the Duchess of Sutherland. Mrs. Stetson entertained a num- 
ber of Californians at tea recently. Some of those were: 
Mrs. Edward J. Tobin, Mrs. Harry Howard, Miss Christine 
Donohoe, Miss Katharine Donohoe, Miss Mary Emma Flood, 
Miss Jean Boyd, Miss Edith Grant, Miss Barbara Parrott and 
Miss Inez Macondray. 

DINNKRS 

JUDGE W. W. MORROW was eighty-one years old Tuesday and 
the birthday was celebrated by a family dinner given by his 
son and daughter-in-law. Mr. and Mrs. William Hurlburt 
Morrow, at their apartment at the Keystone. 

MR. AND MRS. PAUL PAGAN gave a dinner a few evenings ago 
at the St. Francis, when they entertained among others Mr. 
and Mrs. Archibald Johnson. Mrs. Vida Dodge Mackay, Miss 
Gladys Quarre, Mr. C. Ellsworth Wylie. Mr. Benno Hart Jr. 
and Commander Albert Rees. U. S. N. 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK HOWARD ALLEN have invited their 
Marin county friends to another of their delightful al fresco 
parties in the Raas grove at Ross on Saturday night. 

MR. ACBERRY LEE was a dinner host Tuesday evening at the 
Burlingame Country Club. The guests of honor were Mr. 
and Mrs. Chandler Kellogg of Los Angeles. 

MR. AND MRS. CHANDLER KELLOGG were the guests of honor 
at a dinner given last Friday evening by Miss Florence Loomis 
at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. Loomis, 
in Burlingame. 

.MR. AND MRS. MILLEN GRIFFITH and Mrs. Berrien Anderson 
entertained a group of the society set in Marin county at an 
interesting party on Saturday evening. Invitations had been 
issued during the week for a "charade party," and when the 
guests arrived they found they were to take part in im- 
promptu theatricals. An extremely clever performance was 
given and later in the evening a buffet supper was served. 
The affair was held at Mr. and Mrs. Griffith's home. 

Mi;. AND MRS. JAMES REID were hosts to sixteen at dinner in 
the Gray room at the Fairmont Hotel for Rear-Admiral and 
Mrs. Edward Simpson, who left for Washington on Friday. 
DANCES 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM H. CROCKER will give a dancing 
party at their home this Saturday evening to entertain the 
friends of their son, Charles, who is home from Yale over the 
school vacation. 

IN TOWN AND OUT 

MR. AND MRS. CHAS. TEMPLETON CROCKER returned Sat- 
urday from New York, where they have been visiting since 
their return from Europe. They have reopened their San 
Mateo home for the summer. 



Ink- 1". l'LH 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



MR. AND MRS. THOMAS FINIGAN and their daughters, the 

.Misses Patricia and Peggy, are here from Chicago. Mrs. Fini- 
gan is visiting her family, the .1. W. Judges at Bnrlingame. 
while her husband plans to join friends at the Bohemian Grove 
and to remain until after the annual jinks. 

MRS. WILLIAM FORD NICHOLS has gone East to visit her 
daughter, Mrs. Charles Mills, and family at Boston. 

MRS. JOHN A. WAGNER and her daughter, Miss Corinne Wag- 
ner, who came in from the Philippines recently with Colonel 
Wagner after three years' intermittent residence there, are 
planning to remain in San Francisco for several weeks' visit. 
Mrs. Wagner, before her marriage, was Miss Eva Coryell. 

MRS. FREDERICK BEAVER and her niece, Miss Caroline Madi- 
son, will leave Monday for Lake Tahoe for a visit of several 
weeks. 

MRS. MELVILLE SCHWEITZER left on Friday for Banff, where 
she will meet Mr. and Mrs. Roy Carruthers, who will return 
with her for a visit. 

MISS JANE AND MASTER PAUL FAGAN are spending the month 
of July at the Hotel del Monte, where they have joined their 
grandmother, Mrs. Eugene Lent. 

MRS. WASHINGTON DODGE and Mrs. Vida D. Mackay have 
taken apartments at the Hotel Fairmont, where they will be 
throughout their stay in San Francisco. 

MRS. BERNARD FORD has gone to Santa Barbara, where she 
will remain until the middle of August. She will first visit 
Mrs. Walter Scott Franklin, who has been spending the sum- 
mer at the Franklin ranch at Goleta, and later she will join 
Miss Katharine Ramsay at El Mirasol. 

MR. AND MRS. HENRY WASHINGTON DODGE left Thursday 
for Southern California. They will visit in Santa Barbara, 
Los Angeles and Catalina and will be away a fortnight. 

MR. AND MRS. UDA WALDROP have been spending several 
days at the Feather River Inn, having gone up to the moun- 
tains last week. 

THE MISSES MARY AND MARGARET REDINGTON, who at- 
tended school at Dobb's Berry, are with their parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur Redington, in San Mateo. 

MISS HELEN CONROY of Butte, Mont., is here on a midsum- 
mer visit, a house guest of the William S. Gibbs' family. Mrs. 
Gibbs and Miss Conroy were sorority chums at the University 
of California. 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS DRISCOLL, who have been in Port- 
land and elsewhere, have returned after an absence of sev- 
eral weeks. 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH TOOLE (Isabel de Viosca) are at El 
Encanto at Santa Barbara, where they expect to remain a 
week or so longer. 

MRS. CORBETT MOODY, who went east sometime ago to be 
with friends and also for her health, has returned after an 
absence of two months or so. 

MR. AND MRS. DANA McEWEN gave a house-party over the 
week-end at their summer place on the Russian River. 

PR. AND MRS. WALTER I. BALDWIN have returned to their 
home in this city, after a visit at Lake Tahoe, where they 
were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. Ward Mailliard Jr., who 
are spending the summer there. 

DR. AND MRS. HOWARD NAFFZIOER and their little daught- 
ers took their departure Monday for Lake Tahoe. where they 
will be for a month. 

MR. AND SIRS. CLARENCE ODDIE and their children left sev- 
eral days ago for the Brockway Tahoe Club, where they will 
spend several weeks. 

INTIMATIONS 

THE MISSES MARIANNE AND KATHERINE KUHN, lovely- 
twin daughters of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Kuhn. who formerly 
lived in Burlingame, are en route from their ranch home in 
Idaho to visit their kinsfolk. Mr. and Mrs. Fentress Hill in 
Burlingame. They passed the late winter at Palm Beach 
where thev were much admired. 

MR. AND MRS. WARREN GREGORY and their family have gone 
to Yosemite and will stop at Wawona for a few weeks. 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM WEIR. Mr. and Mrs. Ross Faxon 
and Mr. and Mrs. Douglas McBryde are a group of friends 
from Woodside and Palo Alto who will soon leave for the 
Feather River country. They will be away a fortnight. 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD T. TOB1N have taken an apartment 
in Paris, where they are at present, and will remain for the 
summer. Their children. Barbara and Richard, are with them. 

MR. AND MRS. RICHARD HANNA are entertaining their daught- 
er, Mrs. Gardner Bullis of I.os Angeles. The Hannas are oc- 
cupying the Thomas Eastland residence at Burlingame. 

MR. GEORGE McNEAR .1 R was host at a house parly over the 
last week-end at the McNear country place near Mount Di- 
ablo. His sister, Mrs. E. Swift Train, and Mr. and Mrs. Hor- 
ace Van Sicklin chaperoned the group. 

MR. AND SIRS. PHILIP GREY WORUM (Miriam Gerstle), are 
leaving London in a few days to come to San Francisco, ac- 
companying Mr. and Mrs. Mark Gristle and Miss Louise 
Gerstle. who are returning after being abroad for several 
months. This will be the first visit of the Worums since their 
marriage a year or more ago. 



MRS. LOREN DUDLEY VAN HORNE will arrive in San Fran- 
cisco early in August with her children. They are planning 
to pass the summer at Santa Barbara. Mrs. Van Hornc is 
the daughter of Mrs. Sherman Stow, whom she has visited 
in the summer. 

MISS SARAH REDINGTON and her sister, Mrs. Redington Wil- 
son of Santa Barbara, are in Berkeley attending summer 
courses at the University of California. They are to return 
to Santa Barbara about August 1. 

MRS. RALPH PALMER is receiving the congratulations of her 
friends on being up and about again after a severe fall suf- 
fered at the Marin Golf and Country Club on July 4, when 
she slipped and injured her hip. 

MRS. ETHEL HAGER is planning to return to Paris in the fall 
and to make her home there. She spent last fall and winter 
in Europe and was active in the social affairs of the Ameri- 
can colony. 

MRS. HARRY LAWRENCE KAUFMAN will be in California sev- 
eral weeks longer before returning to her home in Seattle. 
She is dividing her time between the home of her sister, Mrs. 
Mountford Wilson in Burlingame, and that of her daughter, 
Mrs. Loring Pickering in town. 

MRS. ERNEST STENT and her daughters, Miss Frances and Miss 
Katherine Stent, will sail on July 28 through the Panama 
Canal to New York and will leave there for Europe soon 
after their arrival. They expect to be away over a year and 
Miss Katherine Stent will enter boarding school. On their 
return, Miss Frances Stent will make her debut in society. 
TENNIS 

ABOUT FIFTY OF THE SMART SET of Burlingame took their 
turn at tennis Tuesday, the courts being crowded all day long. 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker, just home from Monte Carlo where 
tennis is also in great favor, was on the courts at her fav- 
orite sport. Among the most skilled of the players on the 
courts of the Burlingame Country Club are Mrs. Walker Salis- 
bury, Mrs. Parmer Fuller, Mrs. George Nickel, Mrs. Bernard 
Ford, Mrs. W. C. Van Antwerp, Mrs. Edward Clark. Mrs. 
Lawrence McCreery, Miss Florence Loomis and Miss Mary 
Stuart La Boyteaux. 

DEL MOXTE 

THE EARLY SUMMER SEASON at Del Monte is witnessing a 
great revival of horseback riding, which is just now the fav- 
orite diversion of a large group of Los Angeles and San 
Francisco debutantes who are summering at Del Monte and 
Pebble Beach. An interesting group of young riders often 
seen on the trails in Del Monte Forest is composed of the 
Misses Frances Fertig and Florence Boardman of Pebble 
Beach; Miss Mary Forve. Pasadena, who is spending July at 
Del Monte Lodge with her brother, E. Victor Forve; Mrs. 
Ted Miller, Los Angeles, a recent visitor at Del Monte Lodge; 
Miss Francena Henderson of Monterey, who has joined her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Robinson, at their Spanish abode 
for the summer; Miss Catherine Cheney and Miss Jane Lawler, 
house guests for the past few weeks of Miss Florence Board- 
man at the E. D. Porter home at Pebble Beach. 

MR. AND MRS. ANDREW F. MAHONEY and a party including 
Andrew Mahoney Jr. and Miss Rosalie Mahoney have been 
at Del Monte for several days. Other recent visitors from San 
Francisco have included: Mrs. Etienne de Szymanski, Mrs. 
Douglas W. Dod^o and the Howard F. McCandlers. 

MR. AND MRS. .VI. J. SULLIVAN and Mr. and Mrs. Warren Spci- 
ker formed a recent party of visitors at Del Monte Lodge. 
Mrs. Sreiker was later at Hotel Del Monte with Mrs. Roy 
Somers. 

MISS MARY GOWAN LANSDALE. San Mateo, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Milton Latham, San Francisco, are planning to build homes 
in Carmel Woods, recently procuring property in the heart 
of the woods near Pebble Beach. 

FEATHER RIVER INN 

GUESTS REGISTERED AT FEATHER RIVER INN week of July 
7th; Mr. and Sirs. J. B. Keating, Piedmont, Calif.; Miss Keat- 
ing. Piedmont, Calif.. Mr. and Sirs. F. B. Surryhne. San Fran- 
cisco. Sir. and Sirs. C. L. Smith, San Francisco; Sliss Helen 
Smith, San Francisco, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Robinson, San 
Francisco. Mr. James Irvine. San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. 
Uda Waldrop, San Francisco. 



— Skeleton of a man 45 feet high has been unearthed in 
( heops. Girls, we opine he was some sheik in his era, eh .^ 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Bush Street, Between Towell and Stockton, San Francisco 
Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLBTHEN. Proprietor 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 19. 1924 




By KEM 

"Among books, certainly, there is much variety of eonipanv, 
ranging from the best to the worst, from Plato to' Zola; and the 
first lesson in reading well is that which teaches us to distinguish 
between literature and merely printed matter." — James Russell 
Lowell. 

THE INTERPRETER'S HOUSE, by Struthers Burt, 
is a present-day story of New York social and business 
life as viewed through the eyes of a young man. Gulian 
Eyre. This Gulian Eyre, thirty-five years old, something 
of an explorer, a captain of artillery in the American army 
during the late war, later, a member of the embassy at 
Tokyo, and most significant of his quality — a verse-writer 
— comes home to his family, whom he "has only seen at 
brief intervals for twelve years. Hitherto he had detested 
conventional living, and preferred exotic countries and men 
and women "blessedly devoid of tradition and rigidities," 
and his homecoming was not "because he wanted to imi- 
tate the chastened heroes of the more popular magazines; 
....seeking a bride.... not to make money, or because, 
'After all. America was the best country in' which to live' 
— he knew perfectly well that it was probably (for him) 
the most uncomfortable and expensive of all civilized na- 
tions — but because he could think of nothing else that might 
quiet^ the vague restlessness that had recently overtaken 
him." 

He finds his sister. Mrs. Perry Shipman, one of New 
York's loveliest younger matrons' and his brother, Philip, 
the active head of the famous old banking house of Eyre 
& Co.. whom he'd always considered self-contained and 
marvelously stable, as confused as himself. His sister tells 
him it is because of all generations — his and her's, in their 
thirties, have suffered more than any, because "we have 
neither the sublime arrogance of the' young, nor the un- 
shakable although shrunken confidence' of the old." It is 
with the re-actions to present day problems the story is 
principally concerned; it is frankly, interestingly written 
and worth while. Gulian Eyre's quest for a cure for his 
restlessness brings us in contact with various modern types 
of men and women. All are real people; Drusilla, the glim- 
mering, lovely Drusilla; Vannya, "who had a trick, all 
foreign men had; they were cognizant of a woman in a 
way no American was — " Lael, of the younger set. who 
did most of the wooing, and Mrs. Prendegast. who was 
"unsettled and unsettling" and had a disinterested husband. 

From all these interwoven lives Gulian arrives at cer- 
tain views be finds himself stating boldly to his own as- 
tonishment and diversion: "It's fun to hunt God because 
it keeps you keen spiritually; it's fun to hunt learning be- 
cause your mind is a muscle and it gives you the same 
glow to conquer a mental problem as it does to conquer 
a physical one; it's fun to be decent because you are out- 
running yourself; it's fun to be faithful to one woman be- 
cause she laughs and you do, too. Tears aren't fun." 

The book is in its second printing since February, is on 
the Best Seller list, and much called for by the Libraries. 
— substantial recognition of a book that is "literature" and 
not "merely printed matter." 

Scribners, $2. 

* * * 

The readers who enjoyed reading David Garnett's "Lady 
Into Fox," and made remarks about the truth of the fable 
in depicting the generally foxiness of femininity, will have 
a chance to pass judgment shortly on Christop'her Ward's 
parody which he calls "Gentlemen Into Goose" just out in 
England, and soon to be published in this country. 



The last Publisher's Weekly tells us that Wayland O. 
Dean, the popular pitcher of the New York Giants, was 
found by a reporter enjoying the fiction of Dickens and 
Thackeray, and adds "If the good healthy minded Ameri- 
can boys can all see that books are a natural part of an 
active athletic career, they will have an increasing respect 
for books wherever they find them." 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



VACATION TIME 

IS 

FLASHLIGHT TIME 

Renew your batteries and bulbs before going away 

HETTY BROS. 

Headquarters For 

FLASHLIGHTS— BATTERIES— BULBS 

Free Flashlight Battery with every $3.00 sale or over 

during months of June and July. 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 
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444 Market St. 6711 Santa Fe Are. 



Mayerle Glasses' 

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Relieve Eye Strain 

960 Market St. 




Scientific Bye Examination 

29 Years' Exclusive Optical Practice In 

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TAKE THIS FROM ME! 

Don't experiment with motor oils. 

Insist on a top-notch, satisfactory article, it's 

MONOGRAM 



MtJamalpais| B Sll M S s 

MT. TAMALPAIS & MUIR WOODS RAILWAY 
712 Market St., Phone Garfield 4560 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

WHY 

(It's the water and the table) 
Located in the Valley of the Moon, close to General Vallejo and Jack 
London's homes ; Koif links close by ; sulphur water swimming pool, 
f.SxS.T. and private tub baths; fireproof hotel. If you want health 
and rest, give us a trial. Write for booklet. T. H. CORCORAN, Prop. 
See Peck-Judah. Agua Caliente, Sonoma Co. 




Tel. Kearny 365 



655 Sacramento St. 
Bet. Kearny and Montgomery Sts. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 



-< PAUL ELDER'S 



AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 



239 Post Street 



San Francisco 



July 19, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



Tow^JLCrier 




) WHO THE DEUILART THOU. 

"ONE THATMLL PLAYTHE 
} PEVIL,SIR WITH yOU" 

~Shakspeare- 



-A little shop, about eight feet by ten, is quite large 
enough for an old lady's business effects. She can there 
take care of all the goods gathered by her waning ener- 
gies. Mending shirts and socks well, and at the same time 
pleasant, Mrs. Rosenthal, aged about sixty-seven, was not a 
person to bring sad thoughts to one. Old and alone, wants 
few of course, with a little sleeping room behind the place, 
with a natural sprightly disposition, there was no occasion 
to pity her. People must get old, and all will not be rich, 
and if we see a woman working at the end of her life, our 
charitable ideas, if any — they involve no expense, when 
kept very secret — should rather be confined to considera- 
tion as to whether from now on, the old dame can get along, 
without being harassed to a waiting grave. 

The game of life defeats our philosophy. Handicapped 
with age, Mrs. Rosenthal could not play it. She was sick, 
and that because of the consequent btisiness worries heaped 
over her shoulders burdened with the years. When shirts 
were brought in to be mended the poor wanted it done cheap 
and the rich sometimes wanted this too, but would always 
leave them with her until they again happened by in their 
automobiles, she meantime waiting for necessary money. 
Then she would get sick and rest up in the hospital at 
the rate of twenty-five dollars a week. Nobody heaped easy 
work upon her, or made overpayments. All thought the 
situation quite nice — a sweet old lady in a cute little shop. 
Somebody, however, thought it might be a good thing to 
tell her how to get past those sieges at the hospital with a 
minimum expense, but when he went there, the shop was 
closed; nobody was inside, nothing was there, and as far 
as Mrs. Rothenthal was concerned, it was to be like that 
always. She was gone. Where? If you are very wise, and 
know this world, your guess will be the same as the 

writer's. 

* * * 

— Sometimes we like a man by first impression. When I 
met Supervisor McSheehy. he struck me as a man of good 
calibre because he did nut have the manner of- a politician 
nor did he shake my hand like one. He was running for 
Mayor, too. I do nut know much more about Mr. Mc- 
Sheehy than this. Until something disappointing comes 
to my mind about him, I shall continue to think he would 
make' a good first official. He has just been unfortunate 
enough to lose three fingers in an accident, for which I 

am very sorrv. 

* * * 

— ". . . .and before three o'clock in the morning the lights 
were extinguished." This is a quotation from "Republi- 
can Court." a book written in 1852 on society in the days 
of George Washington. It's about a party in the early 
seventies of the eighteenth century, and it is a good guess 
to sa\ the? had -<"ne wine at that very elegant gathering 



at Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, where met ambassadors and 
high officials of the country. 

It is to be noted there is a tone of apology in the writing 
which speaks of the time of closing. We have grown puri- 
tanical, for if we stay up so late, especially where the wine 
is served, we need a permit to be thus naughty. 

* * * 

— He's a tough guy. all right. He talks like a sailor, and 
dresses something in effect between a cowboy and a regu- 
lar citizen — white felt hat, and leggings. He has a swing 
and a strut like a sailor man. But a regular nail chewer, 
is he. One thing you must say for him, though, he goes the 
limit in picking his quarrels, for he gets his, as attested by 
his eyes; they are often blacked. When they so appear, or 
at those times when his jaws have the appearance that some 
husky made a determined effort to knock loose his teeth, he 
says he accidently bumped into a street car, or what not? 

* * * 

— How many times is Humphreys going to be arrested 
and tried for the same offense? If he was guilty, he should 
have been convicted long ago. It seems, however, he was 
tried in court, and by a jury, and freed of the charge. Of 
course those who consider there was a mistrial, or a mis- 
carriage of justice, would like to see the man whose auto- 
mobile killed thirteen-year-old Olga Erlandson, put in jail 
in some way. But somewhere in our laws it says, a man 
shall not be put in jeopardy for the same offense. If the 
courts are any good, they ought to be decisive. Trying a 
man on about twenty-five points when only one offense 
is involved, is bad enough. 



— We have heard nothing of the status of the threatened 
actors' strike, scheduled for June 1st, and to be centralized 
in New York City. Where were the newspapers when it 
all happened at time stated? 

The Actors' Equity Association wanted three-fourths of 
their members in all casts, the non-Equity actors associated 
with them in any plays paying dues to their association 
during the period the two classes of players were thus in 
the same cast. 

On lune 1st. the old Actors' Equity agreement with the 
managers expired, and in order that the field be clearer 
for the demands of the Equity actors, as above Stated, sev- 
eral theaters were closed the evening of May 31st. because, 
the managers not having as yet agreed to the requirements 
of the actors, the latter handed in their notices terminat- 
ing their engagements until further settlement. 

In the meantime, a group among the association of man- 
agers broke away because they made up their minds in 
advance that they would not have their playhouses closed 
as was threatened. The old line group of theater bo 
sued both the actors and their former associates for con- 
spiracy against trade, but the court held that as the guild 
of actors already had upon the stage of the country more 
than eighty per cent who belonged to their association, 
there was no restraint of trade in demanding that percen- 
tage in every company. 



^,you pay no more^g 

%TFL0WEI$ 




'TTie\bioe o/ "a Thousand Gardens* 

224-226 Grant Aw. Tel Kearny 4975 



ielands 



Our new process does it/ 





+ 

i 

i 
i 




lie photographed this year on your 
Birthday 



j studio. In all Principal Cltlea of California I 



! 

j Oakland 
! 10ft 14th 

* 



Sao Francisco | 

41 Grant Ave. 7 
* 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Julv 19, 1924 



LE/ISURE'SWW 




OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURES 

Tom Moore. 



Conducted bv Thomas Ashe 



Orpheum 

Harry Carroll's revue. "Everything 
Will Be All Right." is having its 
third inning this week at the Orph- 
eum and is being given the same 
big hand. Linda, the sensational danc- 
ing member of the company, is des- 
tined for a wonderful career, judg- 
ing by her present success, as she 
is not yet out of her teens, and Effie 
Smith acts and sings her "Poppie 
Blues" in faultless style. We think 
Harry Carroll's reiterated hintings of 
"royalties" on some new song of 
his, out of place and liable to react 
against his otherwise excellent stand- 
ing as a producer; likewise his draft- 
ing of John Steele to render said 
song an imposition on the good na- 
ture of the latter. This great singer, 
programmed "America's Greatest 
Tenor." is a holdover from last week 
and continues his charming renditions. 
\\ e much prefer him in the senti- 
mental and the classical numbers, the 
light affairs seeming a desecration of 
a beautiful gift. Next week he prom- 
ises a "Request Program. " Lou Holtz 
in "Oh-Solo-Mio." is entertaining and 
has brand new stuff, while Del Chain 
and Lou Archer, in "Oh I Did Not." 
do a humorous turn ; especially is 
their duet work very fetching and 
funny and their harmony work much 
better than is usual in this class of 
entertainment. Enrico Rastelli. "The 
Master Juggler of the World." exe- 
cutes some wonderful acts of balanc- 
ing and holds the audience spellbound 
by his marvellously dexterous feats, 
but De Coma and Bartelli, acrobats, 
are not particularly interesting. as 
their stuff is old. The Orpheum is 
continuing its standard of high class 
vaudeville. 



Strand 

The picture at the Strand this 
week portrays some excellent emo- 
tional acting. Sylvia Breamer does 
exceptionally good work as the de- 
ceived and greatly wronged girl who 
later finds her grand opportunity as 
"The Woman on the Jury." Frank 
Mayo, as the disillusioned and heart 
broken husband, is very convincing 
and admirably suited to the role por- 
trayed, while Lew Cody, Hobart Bos- 
worth and Bessie Love are well cast. 
The picture closely resembles Chan- 
ning Pollock's "The Sign on the 



Door" and grips interest throughout 
the entire film. Rudy's Manhattan 
Orchestra renders the usual excellent 
music while Walter Dupie sings "I 
Don't Know Why." World News Kino- 
grams and a comedy. "Why Pay 
Rent?" complete a verv good bill. 



Cameo 

"The Guilty One" is written around 
an unusually logical plot — that is. an 
unusually logical plot for a picture. 
And another unusual quality of this 
play is that one does not guess the 
perpetrator of the crime until it is 
plainly stated in the caption thrown 
on the screen, and admitted bv the 
guilty one himself. This involves an 
art that the scenario writer seems to 
seldom possess. The ordinary screen 
play is accepted, not on the merits 
of its plot, but on the merits of its 
actors and actresses and the action 
of the portrayal. "Plots?. ... Pouf! 
\\ hat do they amount to, in the long 
run.-' It's action the people want! 
And we'll see that they get it !" 
So we can imagine the majority of au- 
thors ruminating. In "The Guilty 
One" we see the heroine, played by 
Agnes Ay res. gradually becoming dis- 
gusted and restless at her husband's 
apparent indifference to everything but 
his work'; accepting the attention of a 
well-known rake, although her accep- 
tance is colored by her desire for her 
husband to "get on" in his profession, 
and the rake in cpiestion holds a cer- 
tain favor in his hands, that she de- 
sires for her husband. Her intimacy 
with this man arouses the ire of not 
only her husband, but her very devoted 
younger brother, and works up to a 
criminal crisis, in which the black- 
mailer publisher of "Gotham Gossip" 
is involved. 

Agnes Ayres' change from rather a 



STAGE Training 

NATHANIEL ANDERSON 
Coach 

Director — Pacific Players 

THE LEGITIMATE WAY 

This is actual practice; no theory nor 
false methods; vital; professional. 

STUDIO 

50G Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Kearny 5454 



shallow, pleasure loving woman to the 
defender of her husband's life, is nat- 
urally and splendidly done, and when 
she breaks out into her denunciation 
of the newspaper publisher and brings 
forward a telling clue in her story that 
convicts him. before he does himself, 
she reaches almost a magnificent 
height of histrionic ability We leave 
this theater with a feeling of having 
witnessed something well done. 

This Saturday Harry Carey comes 
in "The Lightning Rider." 



Warfield 

Rex Ingram, the man who made 
"The Pour Horsemen" and "Scara- 
mouche." went to Tunis, northern Af- 
rica, for his latest motion picture, 
"The Arab," which brings Ramon 
Novarro and Alice Terry to the War- 
field screen for the week starting with 
the matinee on Saturday, July 19th. 
It was the ambition of Marcus Loew, 
the man who controls the Metro Pic- 
tures, to make the outstanding cin- 
ema triumph of the H'24-25 season 
and in the beautifully photographed 
and finely acted "The Arab" Marcus 
Loew has attained his ambition. "The 
Arab" is one of the most ably di- 
rected and carefully played attrac- 
tions the screen has presented for 
some time. — the scenic grandeur of 
the story places it in a class by it- 
self and the story firings all the ro- 
mance and drama of the country in 
which it was made. "The Aral)" is 
the second attraction of the Warfield 
for "Greater Movie Season" and it 
will, no doubt, be one of the best 
plays of the year. On the stage Fan- 
chon and Marco will present one of 
their original and intimate musical 
revues and for a new personality in 
San Francisco will present Roy Giusti 
as the chief attraction. The Lip- 
schultz Music Masters will be heard 
in concert and there will be other 
screen and stage attractions. 




A PYRENE Fire Extinguisher should 
he in every home because two out of 
every three fires start in the home 
where the fire hazards are numerous. 
No amount of insurance money can 
replace valued articles in a home 
once lost. Fire in the home has 
added terror because women and chil- 
dren are often alone. 

Be safe with PYRENE. 

Pyrene Mfg. Co. 

Sutter 115 977 Mission St. 



July 1". 1924 

Film Flicks 

Maud Fulton Signed by 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

Maud Fulton has been signed on 
contract to write a series of original 
stories and adaptations for Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer. Negotiations w ere 
made through Irving G. Thalberg and 
it is under his supervision Miss Fulton 
will work. 

There is no more interesting figure 
in the theatrical world than that of 
Maud Fulton. First known as a writer 
of short stories, she then went upon 
the stage and achieved instantaneous 
success as a dancer. With William 
Rock she formed the dancing team of 
Rock and Fulton which became inter- 
nationally famous. Just at the peak of 
her popularity she abandoned her 
dancing career and took up the study 
of play writing. Fifteen of her plays 
were produced and she starred in sev- 
eral of them, chief amongst which were 
"The Brat" and "The Humming Bird." 

Motion pictures offer a brand new 
field for her and she will undoubtedly 
conquer that particular line as she has 
every other one. 

Her first work at the Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer studio is the adaptation 
of the stage play "The Charity Ball." 



Picture and Novel at Same Time 
' A screen production of Louis Joseph 
Vance's story, "Mrs. Paramor," is be- 
ing made before the novel is published. 
The picture, which is being produced 
by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, and the 
book will come out simultaneously in 
September. 

Robert G. Vignola is directing "Mrs. 
Paramor," with Pauline Frederick en- 



(Qocn car ojberated^^ 

6y rp/iab/e 

Criaujfeuns 
u//io //toroucffl/y under- 
stand t/ie/r Jbus/ness 



This means that you can 
dispense with all wor- 
ries as to personal se- 
curity when using our 
cars. Our drivers are 
careful and they never 
violate your desires for 
safety. 




Phone Franklin S17 
1629 Fine Street 
San Franolsoo 



SAX FRANCISCO MEWS LETTER 

acting the title role. Conrad Nagel, 
Mae Busch, Ilunllv Cordon, Patter- 
son Dial and Paul Nicholson complete 
the all-star cast. 

Newest Film Star Makes Statement 

Knowing that the private life of a 
star is not his own, but that of the 
.great public which he serves, Peter the 
I Ireat, the dog star appearing in "The 
Silent Accuser," which Chester M. 
Franklin is directing, has consented to 
give out a few details of his daily ex- 
istence. 

He is awakened every morning at 
6:30 by his owner, Edward Faust. It 
might be interesting to note that Peter 
the Great is the only motion picture 
star who sleeps on the floor. 

After taking his shower and con- 
stitutional, which consists of a frolic 
on the lawn, he has a breakfast of six 
appetizing raw eggs. Then at eight 
he is driven to the studio, arriving a 
half hour later than his co-workers, 
because Peter does not have to go 
through the intricacies of putting on 
a makeup. He has a complexion all 
his own. 

From 9 to 12 he works. Then at 
twelve he drinks a quart of milk, which 
is consumed in about 24 laps of the 
tongue. This taking only about 10 
minutes, he has 50 minutes rest. Then 
from 1 to 5 he works under the kleigs, 
developing a ravenous appetite, so that 
he is quite capable of eating a pound 
of raw veal or hamburger as the case 

may be. 

*.—„ „_.._.._.. — . ._.. ._ , + 



17 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 
For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



««PP« 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

V, g i ii ( c oi' Paul Sodini, deceased 

No 29 121, l >ept 9 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned. 

\v J. Hyn.es, administrator of the estate of 
Paul Sodini, 

.nms against the said decedent. 
to file them with the necessary vouchers within 
four (4) months after the first publication of- 
this notice, in the office of the Clerk of the Su- 
perior Court of the State of California, in and 
for the City and County of San Francisco, or to 
exhibit them with the necessary vouchers within 
four (4) months after the first publication of this 
notice to the said administrator, at his office, BBS 
Phelan Building. San Francisco, California. 
which said last-named office the undersigned 
selects as his place of business in all matters 
connected with said estate of Paul Sodini, 
: sed. 

W. J. HYXES 
Administrator of the Estate of Paul Sodini. 
deceased, 

lisco, California. July 15. 1924. 
i ft Hickey, 
Attorneys for Administrator. 



"Film Stars 

of All Nations"- 

Is the title ot the at- 
tractive front page in 
next Sunday's pictorial 
section, which depicts 
some of the beauties 
from cinema land. Some 
other fair faces, not to 
mention the gowns, will 
be shown on the page, 
"Where Fashions Rule." 
Then there is a page of 
scenic beauty, such as 
you seldom see pictured, 
taken 

Along the 
Russian River — 

Pictures that will live 
long in your memory. 
Then across the conti- 
nent to India, and we 
find some thrilling pic- 
tures made while "Hunt- 
ing the Tiger." "People 
and Places" furnish some 
closeups of notables; 
there are other places 
and people, which were 
shot "A b r o a d," and 
areo-phots of the Uni- 
versity of California and 
the Presidio. Better 
place your order early 
for the 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



SIMMONS 

In the Superior Court of the State of California 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
Cisco. No. 1478113. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California In and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and the complaint filed 
in the office of the County Clerk of said City 
and County. 

Mary Aruksar, Plaintiff, vs. Alexander Aruk- 
sar, Defendant 

The 1 eople of the State of California Send 
Greetings to: Alexander Aruksar. Defendant. 
you are hereby required to appear in an ac- 
tion brought against you by the above-named 
Plaintiff in the Superior Court of the State of 
California, in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, and to answer the Complaint 
therein within ten days (exclusive of the 
3i rvice) after the service on you of this 
summons, if served within this City and County; 
or if served elsewhere within thirty days. 

Tile said action is brought to obtain a judg- 
ment and decree of this Court dissolving the 
of matrimony now existing between 
plaintiff and defendant, on the ground of de- 
ll ful desertion, also for general re- 
v.ill more fully appear in the Complaint 
to which special reference is herehy 
made. 

And you are herehy notified that unless you 
and answer as above required, the said 
iff will t:ike judgment for any money or 
n.mded in the complaint as arising 
upon contract or will apply to the Court for 
relief demanded in the complaint. 
en under my hand and the Seal of the Su- 
the State of California, in and 
for the City and County of San Francisco. 
Dated June 24. IK4. 

H. I. MCLCREVY. Clerk. 
By W. R. Castagnetto. Deputy clerk. 
AUSTIN LEWIS. 

173 Mills Bldg.. San Francisco. Calif.. 
Attorney for Plaintiff. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



|ulv 19. l'LM 




A Car's Endurance Most Essential 
That no automobile is ever out of 
the makers' hands until it is off the 
dealers' floor ; and that the maker 
who would stay in business must fol- 
low each car he builds and see that it 
is serviced as long' as it is in use, 
are contentions of B. F. Everitt. pres- 
ident and general manager, Ricken- 
backer Motor Company. 

"The old theory that it is in the 
interest of the maker to have his 
product wear out and be scrapped 
in the shortest possible time has been 
thoroughly discredited." says Mr. Ev- 
eritt. "It isn't a question whether a 
man can afford to buy a certain car — 
but can he afford to maintain it? 
Look them over and you will see that 
the makers who have come right along 
and registered the greatest successes, 
have been those few who, from the 
first, realized that long life and low- 
upkeep sold more cars than all the 
glib-tor.gued salesmen. 

"A car that runs consistently year 
in and year out; that is economical 
of fuel and oil and cheap to main- 
tain, will sell many of its mates to 
friends of its owner. On the other 
hand, a car that is in the bone yard 
in two or three years and is always 
in the hospital during its short life. 
may make room for one new car — 
but it will be one of some other 
make ! Could the truth be told, it 
would be seen that most of the fail- 
ures in this industry were due to that 
short-sighted policy." 



Nation- Wide Service Limited 
Only as a member of the Califor- 
nia State Automobile Association can 
a California motorist secure the bene- 
fits of a national and inter-national 
touring service, according to an an- 
nouncement made from the Associa- 
tion's general offices in San Francisco 
this week. 

This is the result of action taken 
at the recent Detroit convention of 
the American Automobile Association 
at which a resolution was passed 
pledging the affiliated clubs to refuse 
to give free service of any kind to 
any motorist who is not a member of 
an organization affiliated with the A. 
A. A., according to D. V. Nicholson, 
assistant secretary of the State Au- 
tomobile Association, who attended 
the Detroit convention. The State 
Association is now the largest of al- 
most 1000 automobile clubs affiliated 
with the A. A. A. 

Nicholson said that this action 
meant that only those automobile 
clubs affiliated with the American Au- 
tomobile Association could provide 
their members with a nation-wide ser- 



vice-, lie said that the position of the 
Three A's as the sole representative 
of national scope of the organized 
motorists of America has been fur- 
ther strengthened by its recent ac- 
tion in taking over eastern automobile 
clubs which had been former mem- 
bers of the National Motorists As- 
sociation, a rival national organiza- 
tion which has now been dissolved. 



Great Benefit to Prisoners 
One has but to observe the pale, 
listless men who come from the pris- 
ons to the road camps, and to see 
the change which comes over them 
with a few weeks of healthy outdoor 
life, plenty of good food and eight 
hours of work a day, to know that 
there can be no question of the value 
of the prison road camp from the 
standpoint of the prisoner. His spirit 
is revived. The man earns his way, 
builds up his self respect, and is dis- 
charged physically fit to face the 
world. In other words, he is given 
a real opportunity to make good. 

It ma}- be said, then, that the Cali- 
fornia Highway Commission is en- 
gaged in a humanitarian work in the 
employment of prison labor in the 
construction of highways. While it 
can not yet be claimed that the plan 
is reducing the cost of state highway 
work in California, it is bringing 
about a saving to the state in the 
cost of maintaining the state prisons. 
When a man leaves for the road 
cam]), the prison is immediately re- 
lieved of the expense of his confine- 
ment. Authority over the men, as 
regards discipline, remains with the 
prison, but the cost of his transpor- 
tation to the camp, the salaries of 
the guards furnished by the prison, 
as well as all other expenses of the 
camps, are borne by the highway com- 
mission. 



Wills Returns From Europe 
C. Harold Wills, president and gen- 
eral manager of Wills Sainte Claire, 
Inc., has returned to California after 
a live weeks business and pleasure 
trip to Europe. The trip was made 
for the purpose of conferring with 
two widely known British metallur- 
gists. 

According to Mr. Wills the condi- 
tions in the automotive industry in 
this country are years ahead of the 
industry in both France and England. 
"Ten years ago American engineers 
were copying the design and engi- 
neering principles off foreign engi- 
neers but now the reverse is the case," 
said Mr. Wills. "English and French 
engineers are studiously patterning 
their cars after the American design 
and giving much time to the study 
and research of American processes 
of manufacture. The materials used 
in their cars are, in no way, com- 



parable to the materials used in 
American cars and their methods of 
heat treating are very crude com- 
pared to the highly developed pro- 
cesses on this side of the Atlantic. 

"The conditions are much different 
there than in this country. It seems 
that they want mere transportation 
and are content to sit all cramped up 
and uncomfortable while in this coun- 
try comfort is one of the first things 
the owner looks for. The English 
have a great respect for American 
cars and American processes of man- 
ufacture and a close study of several 
English makes will disclose just how 
thoroughly they have gone into Amer- 
ican principles of engineering and 
how they are adopting these basic 
principles in their own cars. Busi- 
ness in England is rather sluggish, 
but France gives the impression of 
being \ ery busy and most of her in- 
dustries are working on a schedule 
which approximates a pre-war basis." 



Auto Trunks 

AUTOMOBILE TRUNKS AND 

TRUNK RACKS 

W. R. Malm & Co. 

2010 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 




THE BEST 
EVIDENCE 
IN THE WORLD 

PRICE 
PUMP 

The best evidence that the 
PRICE PUMP will meet your 
particular needs is the fact that 
it has been meeting the needs 
of thousands of other farm 
owners for nearly a half cen- 
tury. This fact alone should 
be sufficient reason for you to 
get complete information about 
the PRICE PUMP. 

Write For Catalog 

G. W. PRICE 

PUMP & ENGINE CO. 

Manufacturers 
Members Western Irrigation Equip- 
ment. Assn. 
1350 Folsom St. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
+ .._. .._.._.. 



IT* 



Tel. Franklin SOSr. 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobiles 

Oxy- Acetylene Welding — BUckimlthln*; 

II. W. Culver M. Daberer E. Jobmoo 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 
Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. in.)- Toe 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. .$1.75 



(pen Every Hay from 8 a. m. to !' p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 
In San Francisco 

fir* Post Street, Near Mtirket Street 

Phone Kearny 4 536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners, $1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. AIko Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 

Fish anil (iame a Specialty 



Louis Cerles, Jean Barrere, 
John Piegth, Props. 



•Dfam ^Ijaron drill 

Formerly Bergez-Frank's Old Poodle 
Dog, Bush St. 

French Table-D'Hote Dinner Served 
Sundays & Holidays, $1.25 

:$5 New Montgomery St. 

opposite Palace Hotel, Phone Sutter HOOK 



! Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
I Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 116. San Bruno, Cal. 



. — + 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; 7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite P&lace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 301 San Francisco 



GANTNER & MAISON 

Funeral Directors 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 

Bet. ISth and 19th Sts. 
Telephone Market 64 San Francisco 
+ 



Every Woman 



Should 



Look Her Best 

Keep her hair trimmed, shingled 
or bobbed. 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

815 Clement St. ( ,, 

.500 Geary St. ( Sa " P™"«asco. 

2331 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley 
Established 28 Years. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



Teeth 



' 



A minute examination of your teeth 
made several times a year will enable 
you to arrest any Incipient disease of the 
sums before it has a chance to reach the 
acute stage. Our examinations are free. 
If there is no immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk It over. Red sums 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. Tou will 
like our nerve blocking system; It takes 
away all the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 885 
SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; 
Self Cleansing Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



-■+ 

- + 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van New Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



+ 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



Suit* Pressed by Hand, Only — 
Suits Called Tor and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



V2 1 Paul St-eet 
In Virginia Hotel 



San Franrism 
Phone Franklin 2510 




N. w CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
<>f experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation Is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 8410 

WHAT BEST SERVES TUB PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES TJ8 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



me ^ 

MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Garfield 3026 Palmer Graduate 

Hours 10 to 1 and 2 to 6 

DR. W. N. CLAYTON 

Chiropractor 

Hfstrrn State* Life Building 
99.. Market Street San FranrUro 



i 




New Low Prices 

Keaton Non-Skid 

BALLOON 
CORDS 

You can now purchase complete sets in- 
cluding four Keaton Non-Skid Balloon 
Cord Tires with tubes, four wheels, and 
five rims at less than the former price for 
tires and tubes only. 

Comfort Plus Safety 

The full-size Keaton balloon tire con- 
struction combines the well-known Kea- 
ton Non-Skid safety feature with great- 
est comfort in riding. 

Keaton Non-Skid Balloon Cord Tires are big, soft cushions that absorb road 
shocks and greatly increase the joy of riding. The tread rubber is tough and thick, 
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In addition to having luxurious riding qualities Keaton Non-Skid Balloon Cords 

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shortest possible distance. 

A double design of the patented Keaton Non-Skid tread is used on the Keaton 
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On crowded streets and highways Keaton Non-Skids are working always for your 
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Consult the nearest Keaton Branch or Keaton Dealer for expert advice regarding 
the correct wheel and rim equipment to secure the full advantage of balloon tires. 
Learn the low cost to you for Keaton Full Balloon Equipment. 

Keaton Tire & Rubber Co. 



SAX FRANCISCO 

636 Van Ness Avenue 

Phone Prospect 324 



LOS ANGELES 

1337 So. Flower St. 

Phone Alt. 9245 



PORTLAND 

Sixth Street at Main 
Main 3210 Main 0334 



SEATTLE 
Pike and Melrose 
Phone Main 9904 






SIIKI) .11 I,Y 80, !.H.-)0 




PRICE 10 CENTS _ _ $5.00 PER YEAR 

California Advertiser 



SAN FRANCISCO 







SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1924 



.OS ANGELES 



5P' 

K 

V 
V. 

* 



X 



4 

/ 






*■ 



4 r 

k 

V 

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-0 



A Typical 
View on the 

I'ilt River. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

Assets $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 446,024.41 

MISSION BRANCH ■ Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haipht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4}^) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Investment Service Awaits Your Call 

Our list contains the choice ol Eastern and Western bond offerings, state, 
municipal, school, irrigation and industrial securities. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the issuance, purchase, and handling of 
investment securities. 

Let us solve your investment problems. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

817-1 S California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 

Two Wall 

street 



Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 



Travelers Checks 

for those contemplating CAiVADIAIV TOURS 

may be purchased at 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce Teiephone r DougL ee 2783 

(0<ver 600 branches tn Canada) 



Ik Name PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, wheth- 
er it be typewrit- 
er paper or man- 
uscript cover 
means complete 
satisfaction. 
There is a grade 
for every need. 

Ask your printer 

or ■t.t.on.r | .t,-„,^. u ,. i . lkJJ; ,. j 5Saaf 




BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 186 6 



41 First Street 



San Francisco 



San Francisco Plating Works 

1349-51 Mission St., bet. 9th and 10th 

E. G. Denniston, Prop. 
Phone Market 2915 

We plate every description o,t metal 
work and goods with Gold, Silver, 
Nickel, Brass, Copper and Bronze in 
an elegant and durable manner. 

We call for and deliver work 

Automobile and Household Goods a 
Specialty 



Feather River Inn 

Blairsden, Plumas County, Calif. 

California's Ideal Mountain 

Resort — Opens June 14th 

The Golf Course opened 1921 is one of 
the best courses in California — 9 holes, 
3050 yards, fine grass greens. Jim Smith, 
Golf Professional. Finest Lake and Stream 
Trout Fishing in the State. Horseback 
riding. Hiking, Motoring. Swimming, 
Bowling. Tennis. Fine Orchestra — Danc- 
ing every evening. Excellent motor roads 
from all directions. For rates and res- 
ervations and illustrated folder, address 
Feather River Inn. 

Write for California's Ideal Tour 
Walter Rounsevel, Mgr., Feather River 
Inn. 

Casa De Manana 

La Jolla, California 
Opens July 3rd 

Southern California's Newest and Most 
Beautiful All Year-round Resort Hotel. 
Eighteen hole Golf Course. Tennis, 
Horseback Riding. Ocean Bathing. Finest 
Climate in the United States. Tempera- 
ture ranges from 55 to 85 — Delightfully 
cool all summer. Write for illustrated 
folder. 

Both Hotels Operated by Van Noy- 
Interstate Co. 
W. W. BROWX. Manager. 
Casa de Manana La Jolla, Calif. 



i» 




^ .- 










I 






:JSSL 


1 • i j- 


is?Sfi?PS!l ■■ fli 


■**sfi*t#d8B 



FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

lletween Franklin and Goafb 
Telephone Park 2 7 l 



Myrtledale Hot Springs 

The Wonder of the Pacific Coast 

in the Napa Valley 

Modern Hotel Geyser Heated Rooms 

Natural Mud, Steam, Sulphur Baths 

Swimming and Amusements 

R. Roy Leveira, Prop. 

Calistoga, Cal. 



EL VERANO VILLA 

Surrounded hy beautiful grove of trees. 
Country Resort for families. Open all 
year. Motion pictures, dancing pavi- 
lion, howling alley. Free bus to Min- 
eral Springs daily. Rates $14 week up. 
Capt. A. TULLETT, Prop.; Marcel. Mgr., 
El Verano. Sonoma Co., or Peck-Judah. 




EiUblUhed July 20. 1656 

SAM FBa"««C© 




TER 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




Vol. CV 



SAX FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1924 



No. 4 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, Russ Building. 235 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, 
Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, Calif., Post 
Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 



— Revolution in Brazil sends up the price of coffee. 
American warships on the way may bring down the price 

of breakfasts. 

* * * 

— There is curious significance in the word La Follette 
at the present time; we don't wish to be rude, but the word 

would be just as good without the diminutive. 

* * * 

— There is a plentitude of candidates this year. Either 
business is a little slow, or we are suddenly inundated with 
a most unusual plethora of good citizens who want to give 

us something for next to nothing. 

* * * 

— When the blatant press came out with the statement 
that "California is on Fire and it is all due to the Gover- 
nor." they really spoiled the chance of something really 
good coming out of the fire. Thus does exaggeration de- 
feat its own ends. 

* * * 

— The story that they are telling about town of the men 
who took forty cases of whiskey into a house and, on com- 
ing out, were rebuked by a policeman for not parking near 
enough to the side-walk, should be true, even, if it is not. 

It is quite a typical story. 

* * * 

— The prompt offer of the President to meet the threats 
of the forest fires is very gratifying and should go some- 
what to ally the suspicious of those old-timers who have 
always looked upon the federal government as slightly 

careless about our local interests. 

* * * 

— It is funny that really clever men in politics are driven 
almost irresistibly to stupid exaggerations. A notable ex- 
ample was the remarks of one of our very ablest. Gavin 
McNab, on the liquor question in his speech at the San 
Francisco Center. His Scotch caution had utterly fled. 

* * * 

—And so we romp in. victors, at the Olympic games, with 
some records broken. Of all distinctions those which be- 
long to athletics cause least heartbrcakings and jealousies. 
Our young men and women who have brought credit to 
us abroad are worthy of our admiration and thanks. 

* * * 

—Mr. Mac Lafferty, congressman living in Oakland. 
comes out and solemnly says that the fight of the next 
twenty years will be with the communists. He wants to 
go in "for shadow-fighting, obviously, lor there are no other 
than shadow communists around here. To go to Wash- 
ington to get an Alameda base, and come l>aek with a com- 
munist scare, is funny congressing, 



— We really cannot learn the truth about the progress 
of the conference in London. Here is something which is 
of surpassing importance, but the papers which are sup- 
posed to tell us about it, either know nothing or will not 
say. Just as well have no press as a muzzled one. 

* * * 

— If we were living in Europe we should feel a bit un- 
easy. The amount of rifles and other pleasant things that 
are finding their way into Checko-Slovakia and other such 
places passes comprehension. Something is brewing some- 
where ; wdiich is about as far as we dare predict at present. 

* * * 

— We notice that the British are beginning to say that 
they are hopelessly deficient in airplanes. Knowing our 
trans-Atlantic cousins pretty well, we should like to learn 
what they have invented particularly good in the air-ser- 
vice line. There must be something they are trying to hide. 

* * * 

— The war veteran ladies who held their convention here 
last week went on record against any premature pacifism. 
They were, surely right ; but what becomes of the statement 
so frequently made, that women, as women, are naturally 
opposed to war? That idea must have originated with op- 
timistic bachelors. 

* * * 

— Real estate operations here are to be closely scrutinized 
by the San Francisco Real Estate Board. That is a very 
good idea. We have a notion that there is a little slack- 
ness and that it will well repay the efforts of the Board 
to step in and put an end to them. We cannot afford any 
question about our integrity in real estate transactions. 

— Too bad that Mussolini should be a clumsy worker! 
That message that he wanted Mattetoti stopped; then the 
death of the latter, would be enough to ruin any ordinary 
politician, even a dictator. But dictators seem to be tough 
birds, anyway. Napoleon survived the death of the Due 
D'Enghein. The fact, however, sticks to his memory like 

a burr, and will not be eradicated. 

* * * 

—It is a very funny thing about that League of Nations. 
We won't have it at' any price and yet Secretary Hughes 
states in London that the United States is behind the 
1 law -es plan, which means that we shall again use United 
States soldiers in Europe, if the circumstances seem to de- 
mand it. We are beginning to perk up again after <mr last 

disillusionment. 

* * * 

— We are furnished with a dreadful amount of nauseat- 
ing stuff with respect to the Chicago murder. Now if we 
can only get this August over without the columns of filthy 
twaddle that will be turned out in a noisy cloaca by the 
yellow press! Is there any way in which the corrupting 
influence of the most destructive agency that we have can 
be curbed? Where would Dante have put men who pa- 
tientlv investigated the lowest human passions and then 
play on them to make money? 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Tulv 26. 1024 




Clarence Darrow. famous criminal 
An Astute Defense lawyer and somewhat of a philoso- 
pher, was confronted with the big- 
gest problem of his career in the cases of the two boys who 
had killed young- Franks in Chicago, for a mere sensation, 
according- to their own statement. There are few cases 
which have made as great an impact on the public and 
the feeling that the young monsters should be disposed of 
as quickly as possible prevailed throughout the land. As 
Darrow said, it was no use to try and get a change of venue 
for the trial, as the feeling was universal, and he would 
have no better chance outside Chicago than he did in that 
city. If he had brought up the sanity of the boys as a de- 
fense then the jury would have had to pass on their case 
and there is but little doubt that the verdict would have 
been against them. By eliminating the sanitv plea and 
pleading "guilty" there is no chance of their being in a 
remote contingency sent to the insane asylum. Harrow took 
the bull by the horns and to everybody's surprise pleaded 
"guilty." merely stating that there were mental conditions 
which might in the view of the court tend to mitigate 
sufficiently, to avoid the death penalty. In other words, In- 
placed the responsibility for the judgment squarely on the 
court. For this he apologized, but urged that he had no 
other alternative and that although it might appear some- 
what unfair to load the court with all the responsibility in 
the matter, yet. as counsel for the defendants, he could not 
do otherwise. It may be said to have been a very sagacious 
performance, so candid and so simple and so undeniably 
sound. No one but a very able trial lawyer would have 
dared it. Now. the public is out of the matter, it is all be- 
tween the experts and the court. 



The meeting of the American Bar As- 
Secretary Hughes sociation is another of those gatherings 
in London which tend to cement ever closer the 

bonds of friendship between Great Brit- 
ain and this country. The mere fact that the Bar Associa- 
tion is in no sense a political body, makes the meeting all 
the happier and gives the chance for the Secretary of State. 
who is a great political personage, to discuss freely matters 
which might otherwise be tabu. Hut it is not so much in 
the actual consequences of this meeting that the importance 
of the occasion lies as in the stand which the Secretary of 
State took with respect to the Common Law. He refers 
to the Common Law as having arisen in England, and he 
says, "those who are in this island developed the institutions 
of liberty which were brought to the new world and were 
so fondly cherished that they were safeguarded in an un- 
precedented manner." It will be noted that he stresses the 
liberty of the Common Law and at the present time noth- 
ing needs to be more completely and thoroughly stressed. 
The concluding words of the Secretary of State are so preg- 
nant and so apropos today that they deserve to be memo- 
rized by statesmen and jurists and made the keynote of 
public life. They are as follows: 

"The spirit of the common law is opposed to those in- 
sidious encroachment- upon liberty which takes the form 
of an uncontrolled administrative authority — the modern 
guise of an ancient tyranny not the more welcome to in- 
telligent freemen because it may bear the label of democ- 
racy. There is still the need to recognize the ancient right — . 
and it is the most precious right of democracy — the right 
to be governed by law and not by officials." 



We note with great pleasure that Tallant 
Political Duties Tubbs is a candidate for State Senator at 
of the Rich twenty-seven. We are verv glad to see 

it. and particularly to note that the young 
candidate has a very fair conception of the advantages 
which his position gives him in the field of politics. He 
says "The main thing is that if the voters send me to Sac- 
ramento I'll be independent to vote as I think right to rep- 
resent my constituents and their interests only." There he 
hit the nail on the head. If a man is economically inde- 
pendent he is in just that position. He can act as he sees 
best for the community, independent of any pressure that 
may be brought upon him. He cannot be seduced by money 
when he already possesses it. That is a very important con- 
sideration. It made the integrity of politics in Great Brit- 
ain ; it also made the integrity of politics in our earlier his- 
tory when men of family and wealth were naturally to be 
found in the political life of the country. It would be verv 
fine for the whole of the political system, if the sons (if 
our wealthy men were to turn their attention seriously to 
political pursuits, for then, at least, one of the great evils, 
arising from representation by the needy and therefore by 
the weak, would be abolished. We have had some experi- 
ence with rich men in this state and nobody can say that 
they have not done well in political life and brought credit 
upon the community whose interests they took in hand. 
Senator Phelan was a tower of strength to righteousness 
and good government all the time that he worked in the 
field of politics. None could ever say a word against the 
integrity of his work and the virtue of his conduct. So it 
must necessarily be when those who have no reason for 
dishonesty take up the cause of good government whole 
heartedly and without reserve. That is why we wish Tal- 
lant Tubbs all good luck and hope that he will succeed. 
And then that his example may be followed by others like 
him. 



The American bankers who are to collect 
The Crux of the the money by which the rehabilitation of 
Situation Germany is to be begun, which rehabili- 

tation will enable the payment of repara- 
tions (it is hoped) have spoken. These bankers are very 
able men who have made a life-study of finance and have 
the caution which springs from the responsibility for the 
money of other people. So thev may be supposed to have 
gauged the European situation far more thoroughly than 
any group of politicians ever could do so. for the latter are 
of course involved in the play of politics and are more in- 
terested concerning the effect of proposals on the minds of 
the people than in the actual facts of the case. It appears 
that the bankers in question have demanded, as an essential 
preliminary to any advance of money, the immediate and 
unqualified withdrawal from the Ruhr by France. And of 
course they are sensible in their demand. They do not ad- 
vance the money of other people except upon the practical 
certainty of saving it. and at the same time drawing in- 
terest on it. No banker would advance money to a man 
whose factory was in the hands of a sheriff, with an at- 
tachment on it. And that is just the position in Germany. 
The latter cannot possibly earn anything with which to 
repay loans and meet the claims of the reparation agree- 
ments unless it can work its Ruhr shops and mines and sell 
the products. And there again is the rub. If the flood of 
German products falls on the world, and it will have to 
fall on it to enable Germany to pay. the rumble of falling 
prices will scare many thousands of producers in this coun- 
try and Great Britain. It may be conceded that the whole 
question bristles with difficulty, but that is not to say that 
the American bankers are not right. By all the laws of 
decent finance they are certainly and undeniably right. 
Businese is more sagacious than politics. 



July 26, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



S 




TowwJlcrier 



Q WHO THE DEVIL ART THOU 
?Mf^ [JZ: "ONE THAT WILL PLAY THE 
.HgV gTV DEVIL,SIRWITH VOW 



— Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler, President of Columbia 
University, made a very significant remark, here, the other 
day when he said, "There is a cynicism prevalent, espe- 
cially among; the young people. Their individual liberty 
has been restricted and they feel a contempt for all gov- 
ernment and law.'' This was with reference to the "pro- 
hibition law. He may be right, perhaps this deprivation of 
Individual liberty has had precisely that effect and what 
we notice amiss in our young people may be the direct 
result of this deprivation of liberty. 

— It would be interesting to see what is coming- out of 
the Hetch Hetchy mess; for that it is a mess there is no 
doubt. Within seven months of completion, there are no 
plans for the distribution of power and a new set of bonds 
coming along". Of course the blatant are throwing accusa- 
tions at the mayor but that is nothing new, neither is it 
helpful. We may reasonably conclude that a municipality 
capable of getting- into such a mess is not over and above 
competent to distribute power. 

* * * 

— There is a great deal in what the Kiwanis speaker said 
the other day about much of the trouble with men arising 
from mistakes in the choice of occupations. His sugges- 
tions that groups of men like the Kiwanis should co-op- 
erate in securing positions for and advising with boys start- 
ing life is very admirable and should tend towards the de- 
velopment of much good feeling and mutual respect be- 
tween the older and the younger generation. These sug- 
gestions show us to be honestly striving for improvement. 

* * # 

— Governor Richardson is a matter of fact person. Ik- 
did not take the word of the daily press with regard to 
the fires which were, according to report, eating up the 
state. On the other hand, lie set out in his trusty machine 
to look for the fires and did not find them. It is easv to 
grumble but the evidence of the Governor's own eyesight 
will be hard to overcome and the press has apparently the 
worst of the encounter. 

* * * 

— Some of the great estates here arc representing- to the 
board of equalization thai they are unduly assessed. To 
read the list, it is apparent that in several cases there seems 
to be a very extreme value placed on these properties. It 
is to in. body's good that there should be an unfair assess- 
ment and such in the long run tends only to detriment. 
There is always a tendency to go after the goose with 
the golden eggs, particularly when it is a fat goose. 

* ' * * 

— Now that the police have really taken hold and are 
enforcing the traffic regulations they find a great improve- 
ment. There was not a single arrest when the new traffic 
ordinance went into force on Monday. Fully "0 per cent 
of the drivers meticulously observed the ordinance accord- 
ing to the police. This exactly supports the position we 
have steadily taken that observance of the law in the last 

analysis depends upon firmness of administration. 

* * * 

— To dip into a suit case to look for a collar button and 
thereupon to come across a bundle >>\ love letters indited 
to your wife by an old time friend is surely a shock and 
there is no doubt that Frederick lmsick found it so. For 
he went to the divorce court and got relief. The adven- 
tures of love letters are in themselves the greatest testi- 
monial to human folly. 



— Cupid will have his wax. Thus the elimination of the 
picture bride system has caused the young lapanese here 
to look for a new way of getting wives. They fancy that 
they have solved the question by the importation of lapa- 
nese girls born in Hawaii, who are. therefore, Americans 
by reason of their birth. \ wonder if this very natural plan 
will be taken as evidence of Oriental guile. 

* # * 

— The departure of Charles A. Simmons, manager of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, is a very distinct 
loss. Mr. Simmons, during the three years that he has been 
in control, has brought the present Chamber of Commerce 
to a very high place among similar institutions in this 
country. We wish him well in his efforts in Los Angeles. 

* * * 

— Our local people of all religions are taking much in- 
terest in the great Serra celebration which is to" take place 
in Carmel in October. It promises to be an event of first 
class importance in the history of the state and there is 
none who will not hail the achievement of the restoration 
of the mission. Father Mestres of Monterey and Carmel 
has done wonders with the task that was assigned him. 

— Owing to the dryness in the country and the conse- 
quent diminution in the amount of fishing and other coun- 
try sports we have an unusual influx of people from the 
country this July and they are so pleased with the enter- 
tainment here that there is little doubt that we may look 
for a constant increase of country visitors in the future. 

* * * 

— James Montgomery Flagg says that "Americans strive 
too hard for a sense of humor." He said it here in San 
Francisco after he had remarked that he remembered us 
by our fog. All the same he may be right. We try con- 
tinually to live up to a self inflicted reputation for persis- 
tent humor, there is no doubt about it and the funny page 
is the consequence, Lord help us! 

* * * 

— Sylvester R. Rush, assistant to the attorney general in 
the liquor activities of his office, says that bootlegging will 
be stopped. He also says that San Francisco is no wetter 
than other seaport towns. Nicholas Murray Butler on the 
other hand says that Kansas is just as wet as anywhere. 
It looks as if the Rush conclusion was a bit hurried. 



— Doctor: "Sorry I can't have you round tonight, old 
man. 1 have two new cases coming." 

Proctor: "Don't worry about that. I'm a teetotaller." 



F OR SAL E 

At ATHERTON 
San Mateo County 

Residence 

Eleven Rooms 

Six Acres 

$35000 



Full Particulars 
Owner 



Room 381 



235 Montgomery 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 26, 1924 



The Romance of California Industries 



By Reginald F. Berkeley 




(Part 2) 
Fur Trade With the Indians 

WHATEVER trade was developed in the Golden State 
before the insane action of the Mexican Government 
in 1834, which, secularizing the missions, was responsible 
for the destruction of millions of cattle, was mainly the 
work of the Russians ; unless we are to take seriously men 
of the type of O'Cain, boon companion of the unfortunate 
genius Baranoff, or such casual traders as the Winships 
and men of their like. The Russian-American Company, of 
Ross, did trade with San Francisco to the value of a few 
thousand dollars, but this and other ventures were carried 
on sub rosa. To the trade in furs was added, during the 
first two decades of the nineteenth century, some business 
in tallows and hides, and exports of foodstuffs to Russia's 
northern outposts. But the Scotch firm of Begg and Com- 
pany had gained a solid footing by 1825, and the North 
Britishers often claimed that they were the first to es- 
tablish "regular" business in California. It is certainly true 
that what had preceded could not, by the least discriminat- 
ing' exercise of charity, be so described. Russians, British, 
and Americans (Yankees, as they were called,) were thick- 
ly tarred with the brushes of piracy, smuggling, and brib- 
ery of officials. Credit, however, must be given to Baranofl 
for the vision displayed in the regulations he introduced 
for saving for the women of today the fur seal of the Pribi- 
loff Islands, by his war against the reckless destruction of 
the females and pups. 

If the truth must be told, we have little to boast of in 
our early tradings on this coast. We know from published 
records that it was from the Indians that our traders learned 
the interested humanitarianism manifested in their sealing 
operations, that it was the Indians who were instrumental 
in keeping out of the business those of our traders who re- 
belled against their traditions (originally implanted in them 
by Baranoff). And history records, to our shame, that our 
people rivalled the Siberian desperadoes of earlier days in 
their treatment of those to whom they owed their for- 
tunes. Russian rascality murdered the Indians openly; our 
methods were the more insidious but equally deadly ones 
associated with the fire-water keg and the gun. 

It was in 1809 that John Jacob Astor secured a charter 
for the incorporation of the American Fur Company. Be 
had the sense to realize that the methods of his predeces- 
sors (by which, incidentally, he had profited considerably) 
could not be continued, if international complications were 
to be avoided. The Russian authorities were getting un- 
pleasantly busy with formal protests against the brutalities 
of the "Yankee Pirates," and did not appreciate the fur- 
nishing of arms and ammunition to the Indians, for use 
against their original exploiters. Astor's expedition with 
the "Tonquin" came to grief, and four years saw the end 
of his activities, with the purchase of his interests by the 
Canadian North-West Company, and the hoisting of the 
British flag over the city of his creation, Astoria. The tri- 
umph of the Canadian company was, however, short-lived. 
The Hudson Bay Company fought it for eight years with 
keen weapons of competition, swallowing it at a gulp in 
1821. 

Between 1825, two years after Mexican rule superseded 
that of Spain in California, and 1838, a few Europeans and 
Americans had formed colonies in the state, one-fifth of 
whose inhabitants were Russians until they sold out in 



1842 to Captain Sutter. The first licensed trader on the 
coast was an Englishman, William Hartnell, challenger of 
Begg and Company's previously mentioned claim for Scot- 
land. But it was a Frenchman, Baric by name, who first 
derived appreciable benefit from our Nature-stored gold 
reserves, — and it is to a Frenchman that we owe the origins 
of the orange groves, whose products are known wherever 
sensible folks foregather; to a Frenchman, too, California's 
position in the grape industry. 

The Discovery of Gold 

It may well be, however, that our agricultural laurels 
would yet be to seek, had not Mother Earth disclosed the 
magnet which needs no aid from the imagination to draw- 
frail mankind. For before knowledge of the golden treas- 
ure of metallic mould, buried in our mountain valleys and 
river beds, was common property, very few Americans, 
comparatively, had evinced much interest in California. 
The land of our love and pride was generally visualized as 
a dreary stretch of mountain ranges and arid deserts. Mis- 
sionaries, from time immemorial the pioneers of civiliza- 
tion, and a handful of equally sturdy souls, had penetrated 
her fastnesses, braving the Indian terror and the peril of 
starvation, but they were but a sprinkling over the many- 
hued slopes of the Pacific. It needed the gold-greed and 
its inevitable aftermath to open the eyes of California's 
hybrid settlers to the marvellous possibilities she nursed 
for the sons of man. 

Long years before the dates variously given as marking 
the discovery of gold, its existence in fabulous measure had 
been known to the good padres who had for generations 
sacrificed their lives in the service of their dusky brethren, 
teaching, and introducing them to the fringe of civilized 
ways. Well, however, did they know the blood-stained 
story of the hunt for gold, clearly they foresaw what it 
would mean for those who were in their eyes a sacred trust 
— and they kept their secret. It was not until the year 1841 
that a native son of California, digging wild onions in one 
of the canyons of the San Fernando hills behind Los An- 
geles, stumbled across the precious metal. The deposits in 
that part of the country were, from then onwards, worked 
for some vears. yielding some ten thousand dollars worth 
.if dust and nuggets. But it was the event described in 
Bigler's diary, of date January 24, 1848, that drew the 
motley crowd in whose veins coursed the blood, to the 
fusion of which is mainly traceable the eccentric California!! 
character. "This day some kind of mettle was found in 
the tailrace that looks like goald, first discovered by James 
Martial, the Boss of the Mill." 

(To lie continued.) 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Van Nei« Ave., at Geary Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Is the most refined family hotel In the city 
— a home unsurpassed 



ELMER M. WOODBURY Manager 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 
Pioneer Steam Carpet Beating Works 

Sewing and Relaying of Carpets a Specialty. Special Attention to 

Carpet Dyeing. Class C Fire-Proof Bldg. 
35.1-357 Tehama Street Telephone Douglas 3084 






lulv 26, l'L'4 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




By ANTISTHENES 

O'Dowd on La Follette and Socialists 
^f| r SAY, O'Kane, but it's the divil to know jist how a 
\_J man's goin' to wote comin' Novimber, seein' as how 
all the rigular candedates arre fur this an' agin that phwhat 
Oi'm agin an' phwhat Oi'm fur. The Dimmycrats arre .111- 
lydallyin' wid the Laygue av Nations an' the Raypublicans 
wid the World Court, an' they say both arre wid Whall 
sthreet. so, it's enough to droive a man woild to know just 
phwhat to do nixt Novimber; arre ye the same wav 
O'Kane?" ' 

"Well, O'Dowd, Oi think Oi'll not be wotin' at all, ar, 
if Oi wote, it'll be fur Lay Fullette." 

"An' ye'll wote fur him, O'Kane, will ye, an' yer rilligion 
tayching the contrary? Lay Fullette is a good man, O'Kane, 
—be himself, — but, phwhat about the compiny that is wid 
him? Ye can't be raydin' the papers, John, an' not knowin' 
the Soshilists, in their convintion, niver put up a cande- 
date fur prisidint, an' isn't that the same thing as indorsing 
Lay Fullette?" 

"Thin, O'Dowd, if Oi wote fur Lav Fullette, will Oi be 
givin' me wote to the Soshilists?" 

"Begorra. John, it looks loike ye'll be doin' nothin' ilse 
but that, seein' the Soshilists arre in favor av the Sinitor 
frum Wisconsin, phwhat?" 

"But, would it be a bad thing to give the Soshilists a 
thry at runnin' the guvrmint?" 

"Well, John, the Soshilists have manny things that arre 
good about thim, only the payple wud have to be angels 
to carry out their ideas, an' we're far frum bein' that. 
O'Kane, an' gettin' farther away ivery day. It's wan thing 
to prayche an' another thing to practice phwhat ye prayche; 
they appeal to the poor payple an' till thim phwhat they'll 
do to the rich min. but, John, Oi see all av thim, whin they 
came to their cinvintion, rode on Pullmans an' registered 
in the hist av hotels an' the byes on the soap boxes back 
home payin' fur it. O'Kane. ( )i'm tellin' ye. runnin' as a 
Soshilist is a dom good business; wan niver expicts to git 
elicted on that ticket, but, wid the patriots supportin' thim 
in the runnin'. an' thin, afther the election, supportin' thim 
till they run agin, the candedates arre always taken good 
care av an' not wantin' fur a good livin'." 

"Well, O'Dowd. an' that bein' the case, it's harrd fur 
a man to know phwhere the divil he's at. an' it's not loike 
in the ould days whin ye woted fur somethin' ye wanted, 
ar, agin somethin' ye didn't." 

"Well, i I'Kane, Oi think, afther due consideration a\ the 
different parties. Oi, mesilf, will wote fur Lay Fullette." 

"An' him a Soshilist. O'Dowd? Oi thought it were agin 
ar rilligion an' ye were agin thim!" 

"Well, ( I'Kane, he's not a Soshilist. an' as Higgins wanst 
said: 'Because the divil's wid ye, don't make ye a divil.' 
An' ( >i loike the sphunk av the man. Oi'm moinded he'll not 
be elicted, John, but it wud hurt me conscience did ( li wote 
fur his opponints an' maybe, me wote will hilp to elict 
wan av thim." 

* * * 

Isn't There a Nuisance Law? 

In Paris the other day. two "American" women, one 
presently seeking divorce from a millionaire husband, dis- 
guised as manicurists in order to \isit the Prince of Wales 
now "incognito" in a French hotel, whither he periodically 
repairs presumably to try out his emotional safet) valve. 
And, by the way, the prospective divorcee alluded to is 



about to confer a favor on her husband by matrimonially 
disentangling. Now, it's a long cry from Paris to San Fran- 
cisco s city hall, but— wander out any day into that edifice 

and seek the corridors contiguous to the superior courts 
\ anous sisters of the two "American" females who crawled 
into the apartment of the Prince's are there in numbers 
during court sessions, eyes bulby, ears jerked forward with 
abnormal seeking for the tidbits of offal swirling about in 
the foul maelstrom of human errings. Day in and day out, 
rain or shine, these absorbers of the putrid pace these cor- 
ridors, shuffling in and out the courts, and counting that 
day lost when some portion of revolting evidence is not 
added to their overstocked mental cesspools. 

Tis said that, once she hits the toboggan of evil, women 
gravitate more swiftly than men to the bottom levels of 
depravity. This may or may not be true, but, observation 
has shown us that, often, the male of the species will cover 
Up in confusion during a lurid court expose, where the 
frailer of the sex will but further crane her neck in deter- 
mination to miss no fragment of fetid recital. Exemplifi- 
cation of this may any day be witnessed in and about the 
superior courts when sordid details of human wreckages 
are set out in detail for adjudication. 

There is contact 'twixt the acts of these blemishers of 
fair womanhood — the females in Paris and the female 
hangerson alluded to, — for, both respond to a like inclin- 
ing: "Where the body is, there shall the vultures be gath- 
ered together." 

* * * 

— Will C. Wood, Superintendent of Public Instruction 
in California, has seen fit to grace an unseemly newspaper 
controversy anent red-headed and other lined headed school 
teachers with the following: "I have never known a red- 
headed teacher who was not a success" — in retort to J. R. 
Conniff, kittenish official of the Louisiana school depart- 
ment. While Will and Conniff are at play we would state 
it is foolish to get all het up over the affair, as, with the 
assistance of handy applicatives, the color of female tresses 
is but a matter of selection. 

— The Prince of Wales, travelling "incognito" as Baron 
Renfrew, is soon to come to California! All that was in the 
news section of several dailies this week! Had it been in 
the comics we might smile a bit. but. published as "news," 
we are moved to indignation — are American readers deemed 
infantile when it is expected of them to swallow, seriously, 
this "ostrich-sticking-his-head-in-the-sand-and-is-then-hid- 
den" gesture of 'is Ighness? 

— Apparently to preserve the South American revolu- 
tionary record unbroken. Brazil is presently having a slight 
civil unpleasantness. But. shoot as they will, we'll never 
be troubled with a "Balkans" situation down there; they're 
all Latins, so the affairs are social rather than radical — 
there's not much for a peon to live for, and. a "war" may 
boost him to a "general" — that's why the lower caste fights 
at all. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Bush Street, Between Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 
Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 



Telephone Sutter 6130 



Under Management CARL S STANLEY 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 26, 1924 




Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 

SOME writers we know of. enjoying a certain popular- 
ity not exactly the fame of genius, are pleased to tell 
the public of their early struggles. They weigh down their 
autobiographical sketches with lachrymal statements and 
throbbing ejaculations of their early hardships, which, if 
not a bid for sympathy, late as it might be in coming, is 
aimed to make the bosom throb with interest. Talking of 
yourself in the game of literature can be legitimately meas- 
ured out. and perhaps it's all right to fill the waiting ears 
of your public on the presumption you have the sad tale 
they want when you have not. One good turn deserves 
another, or rather, not to appear sarcastic, a little fibbing 
fertilizes the field for the upshoot of the truth. Plainly; 
every well-read writer did not have the depressing fate 
of almost every one of them who had great merit or genius. 
We are thinking the moment of a lady of the pen now 
telling how very sad it was in her beginning, even with 
the advantage of a husband-publisher. 

It is not enough authors must wail artificially, but ac- 
tresses must enter literature and have their fling at crying 
by the proxy the plume that indites their stage life, it hav- 
ing been all such a terribly, terribly hard struggle — that's 
about the way an actress usually writes — when they never 
had to even seriously exert themselves to gain placement, 
and stage people who do not strive for their positions are 
exasperatingly lax in their efforts at art. Ethel Barrymore, 
it is rumored, is at work on a book which is to tell of her 
great trials. The mere words of this announcement is try- 
ing enough without the story of the youngest Barrymore's 
life. Of all the families that comprise the aristocracy of 
the stage the Barrymores are of the first two or three. Hard 
times? To preserve the name of Thespis, Ethel's people 
brought her into high stage society, on it and ofif. Had she 
not remarkable personality, her greatest real asset. Maurice 
Barrymore's Ethel was by lineage destined to be born in 
the tower of fame. Why must she write a dreary book 
about it all — all the hard, hard times. < >ur only relief is 

in the protest. 

* * * 

— After all, perhaps it is necessary to have radical news- 
papers, for while they are too extreme, it is from them we 
get the truth in plain and unmistakable words. The con- 
servative journals are too mild in tone to impress upon 
the people what is wrong and radically so. There are some 
dailies neither radical or conservative, merely sensational. 
but it is but the truth to say that the glaring faults of the 
nation will only lie thoroughly and vigorously stated by 
radical newspapers. Too much honey produces a sicken- 
ing sweetness. Here are some startling quotations: 

"Essential minerals, oil. waterpower — 'white coal' — .... 
we are throwing away. 

"Forest fires are eating up what criminal waste on the 
part of the timber interests failed to destroy. 

"Near before last $16.67S.4S5 worth of timber went up in 
smoke when 1 1.500.000 acres of forests were razed by fire. . . 

"We are told that $300,000 spent in 1922 might have 
saved some $16,500,000 worth of trees. Net loss to taxpayers 

in one vear. $16,200,000." 

* * * 

— One would almost want to live a hundred years longer 
for the sole purpose of getting the facts of the Russian sit- 
uation as they will then be written. Our personal opinion 
is that the Russian bolsheviks are a bad and murderous lot. 
To this opinion we have held in the face of many very 



different ideas on the subject and proclaimed by very in- 
telligent and well-meaning as well as deeply contemplative 
people. By these it is said that the Slavonic democracy 
of autocracy is not that at all; it only seems so; Trotzky 
and his army and the ruling minority are really the hearts 
of the great majority there; that their cruelties and their 
wholesale executions exist only in propaganda. 

It is difficult to believe that all the nations and multi- 
tude of citizens of every other country in the world can so 
concentrate against the innocent of one race that well over 
ninety-nine per cent of the inhabitants of the globe be- 
lieve that race monsters. 

— We should not imagine that old things are liked by 
the real connoisseurs merely because thev are old. It is 
but natural for a lover of fine workmanship to appreciate 
the handicraft and paintings of bygone days, especially in 
lost arts, and more to the point, when that artistry which 
moved the particular artisans and artists is so rarely 
matched today in value or the mastership of care. It might 
be said in passing amongst those who love and who pre- 
tend they are enamored with fine articles, the connoisseur 
is a rare avis in the numbers of collectors. 

— A woman in Chicago said she never told her boy after 
he became eighteen years of age that "You can't do that; 
I won't let you." She said to him: "Do you think you 
should?" This was followed by some talk a youth of that 
age should understand if he had any sense at all. She 

taught him from then on to discipline himself. 

* * * 

— It would be a great benefit to our characters, if mothers 
would at this time begin that proceeding, if not sooner. 
We should learn the art of seeing ourselves and checking 
up on our own actions. It would be so much better than 
waiting for the censure of the world, which would have 
less occasion to revile or accuse us all who undertook to 
not be afraid when alone of a little frankness now and then. 

* * * 

— Speaking of academicians, it is too much when a group 
of men are in position of authority that permits them to 
say who has talent and who has not. These respectables 
have been proved too much in error. Witness the Prix de 
Rome given by the French Academy to young students in 
art whom they favor. It consists of a trip to Rome and 
support there while the favored one studies to become 
great. So far it has been invariably, or almost invariably, 
the case that he never became famous, while the struggling 
and neglected have. The prize is given to a conventional 
artist who satisfies the powers that be. while the man that 
is original and progressive, apparently because he is so. is 
overlooked. We have the great mural painter, Puvis de 
Cbavnannes, who in the height of his ability was refused 
admission to the French Academy for nine years. After 
being reviled by everybody, he was finally admitted, but 
he later founded an academy of which he was president. 

— There is a lot of this kind of notions in our democracy, 
let us not lie fooled on the score. We heard one man talk- 
ing to another, evidently trying to sell him an automobile: 

"Street cars were only made for the riff-raff, anyway." 

* * * 

— Well, we would not have liked a Tammany man as 
president. 



— After accompanying his lady customer through va- 
rious departments, the proprietor of the store escorted her 
to the door. "I am sure you are very attentive." she said; 
"did you think I could not find my way out again?" "Well, 
it wasn't that exactly, madam." he answered politely; "you 
see. we've missed so many things lately that we've got to 
be careful." 



July 26, 1924 



\XI> CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




►VVNN%X%VV^VV%>VN%%XNVXNNN%VVNNNXXV>«>»VXN%XVNXNNXVSNNSNS\\\V%NX%X\%NV«^V*XNX%1^V%X^%*/ 



He Hath No Power That Hath Not Power To Use 



•>•> 



By Eleanore F. Ross 

&SXX^»«X*XXXXXXX»ifXX3^^ 



Tl I E "P. G. & E." had been nothing- mure nor less than 
a much-used name to me; it had no particular sig- 
nificance; I took its service for granted, as one takes other 
services of great organizations in the ordinary routine of 
life. It meant no more to me than the "S.P." or the "Tele- 
phone Company" or numerous other public utilities. 

So I started out on the tour of inspection which the Pa- 
cific Gas & Electric Company has annually instigated for 
the editorial press of California, with only the pleasurable 
anticipation that one feels towards taking a trip into un- 
known and unexplored lands, my only regret being that 
we boarded the train at night, thus missing some of the 
loveliest scenery in California, reaching Sissons early in the 
morning. A berth in the train being a new experience, how- 
ever, I slept hardly at all, catching through the window of 
the drawing room flying glimpses of mountain and river, 
under the pale light of the waning moon. 

* * * 

The mountain train met us at Sissons. and we all piled 
aboard, for a four hour trip through virgin forests, along 
rushing rivers, winding interminably around Mt. Shasta, 
refreshed by bountiful lunches and all the fruits of the sea- 
son heaped into our laps, until our destination, Pitt River 
Development No. I, was reached. 

Here is the great power house, (one of twenty eight 
hydroelectric and four steam plants operated by the Pacific 
Gas & Electric Company), ecpiipped with two 46,666 h.p. 
three-phase units, the largest in the United States; a throb- 
bing, rumbling, thundering palace of potentiality, in which 
is installed a complete radio station for the use of the em- 
ployees; above it the huge pipe lines down which the waters 
of the Fall River rush. 

It was explained to me that to obtain sufficient force for 
hydro electric power, the mountain was tunneled through 
into the bed of the Fall River on the opposite side, and 
its waters were diverted through this tunnel, down into 
the surge chamber, (measuring sixty feet in diameter and 
sixty feet in depth), and thence into the descending pipe 
line to the power house. From the power house, the wat- 
ers descend again into the Pitt River, hundreds of feet 
below. 

Being anything but a mechanician or a mathematician. 
my mind was in a bewildering jumble of technical phrases, 
which were as unintelligible to me as to a babe unborn. 
Transmission, hydraulic turbine generator units, voltage, 
kilowatt hours, amperes, pressure to the square inch. etc.. 
etc.; these words and phrases spun and swept around in 
my head even as the waters in the vast surge chamber on 
the hill; and I wondered if these various editors, political, 
literary, financial, social. — understood all this electrical jar- 
gon? Could they grasp the immensity of this wonderful 
public service through the medium of the information given 
us so freely by obliging guides on our tour of these par- 
ticular .stations? 

One could not gather by their expressions, at all events, 
for the editorial frown was complete!} l"st in wide smiles 
of appreciation of the view ; the balmy weather; the cord- 
iality of the P. G. & E. Officials; the pleasant accommoda- 
tions, and the general lavishment of our entertainment. 

* * * 

"What impressed you the most on this trip?" asked my 
companion as the P. ti. & E. Special neared the Oakland 
mole on our journey back to the city. 



"It's too tremendous an undertaking to answer that off 
hand." said I ; "I must have time to collect my wits." 

In my heart I knew what had left the deepest impres- 
sion ; it was not my first sight of the strange, pale white 
and gray, wraith-like rocks of Castle Crags, jutting into 
the blue of the July heavens; not the dark mauve of Mt. 
Shasta, with its snow streaked sides; nor the flashing white 
riffles of Pitt River, breaking over the boulders strewn 
along its emerald green waters ; not the whole vast and 
beautiful territory of Shasta County. It was the magnifi- 
cent ruthlessness of the power of the human mind over mat- 
ter ; the mental force that can snatch rivers from their 
natural course and harness them into immense pipe lines 
and surg'e chambers, in turn to use their force for creating 
that greatest motive power of the universe — electricity ; 
that can gnash the sides of great mountains and fling their 
rocks into the monstrous maws of gigantic crushers ; that 
can, almost in the twinkling of an eye, build a home camp 
for over a thousand men, and instill into it the precision of 
government, the cleanliness and orderliness of an armv 
headquarters, all for the purpose of bringing light and 
power into the teeming cities, mills, railroads and factories 
of California. 



MARKET SONGS 

Barter 

Fresh lettuce crisp and white and torn 
For sale within the market place, 
The seller — poor and labor worn. 
The buyer — rich and fair of face. 

I heard the price. Twas very small. 
She said. "Too much." lie answered. "No." 
Haggling she went from stall to stall 
Who never made a green thing grow. 

Color 
One paused before a window where 

On whitest satin were displayed 
Dee)) coral, rubies, cornelians - 

A brilliant symphony in red. 

And one stopped at a weathered stall 
To gaze with wonder at a ring 

( If burning color exquisite 

Red peppers on a slender string. 
— lohn Richard Moreland, in The Wanderer. 



— "(.'nine." sail! the mother, to her little girl, "you have 
been very naughty, and I'm going to lock you up in the 
chicken-coop." 

"All right," said the naughty little girl. "You can lock 
me up in the chicken-coop if you like, but I ain't g"ing to 



— "Yes," she said, "my friend Maud is only twenty-five. 
but she's been married three times, and all her husbands 
have been named. William." 

"You don't say! " replied he. "Why. she must be a regu- 
lar Kill collector." 



— Husband: "Dearest, when I am gone how will you ever 
pay the doctor's bills?" 

Wife: "Oh. don't worry about that. If the worst comes 
to the worst I'll marrv the doctor." 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 26, 1924 






iFlNANCIALy 1 

By P. N. Beringer 

BUSINESS is improving as to the months of May and 
June. May was a month which fell behind and 
June was not much better. The wiseacres who write the 
financial "dope" for the daily papers, almost without ex- 
ception, laid the poorer business of the months of May 
and June to the fact that this is a presidential year. That 
solution goes all right for people who do not think, read, 
or make comparisons. I note that business in Brazil, Ar- 
gentina, France, England, India, the Philippines and many 
other countries suffered a slump in May and June. Is it 
possible that this year being one in which we choose our 
president to succeed Mr. Coolidge could have so wide reach- 
ing an effect? Of course not. I do not know why the 
world wide slump occurred, but there is no doubt that some 
good and sufficient reason exists to account for the shrink- 
age and that this reason applies as effectively everywhere. 
There was no great drop off in business during the two 
months mentioned but the falling away was general, as 
far as reports show, the whole world over and could not 
possibly be laid to the cause given by the economic writers 
of this country. 

The Banks and Money 

The banks show no anxiety as to the money situation. 
There is no cause for anxiety and business men are not 
experiencing any trouble about loans. Money may be said 
to be easy. 

* * * 

House Rises Again 

Colonel House rises to remark that the Ruhr contro- 
versies are laid for good and that they will probably not 
cut much figure in future European political discussions. 
Colonel House is one of the wise silent men who some- 
times come to the front and are very useful to their fellow 
citizens. He is of the opinion that if there had been an 
American on the Reparations Board and if the United 
States had endorsed the findings at Versailles that none 
of the troubles which have occurred as to making Germany 
stand up and pay would have happened. This may be true 
or it may not be true. I am of the opinion that Germain 
started out deliberately to delay carrying out any of the 
provisions connected with reparation payments and that 
no matter what had happened as to the Versailles league, 
Germany would still have delayed and delayed. The best 
proof of this fact is found in her conduct now, after having 
accepted the Dawes' committee suggestion "as a basis for 
negotiations." 

* * * 

Music Dealers' Week 

This week we have had more than a thousand of the 
dealers in musical instruments here in convention assem- 
bled. They have been entertained and they have deliber- 
ated and the meeting has been productive of much g 1. 

These conventions and meetings of the men and the wo- 
men engaged in the various industries of the Pacific Coast 
are productive of the greatest good for themselves and for 
the city and the state. 

* * * 

Cotton Raising 

We are gradually becoming a factor in the raising of 
cotton and it is certain that in a few more years our cot- 
ton crop will be so large that we will be recognized as a 
cotton raising state. Fresno, Kings, and Kern counties are 



bound to figure very largely in cotton growing of the fu- 
ture and the bankers and others who are interested in cot- 
ton culture development are very optimistic as to the fu- 
ture. They claim there is a strip of country ideally fit for 
cotton growing and that this strip is more than a hundred 
miles long and that all it needs is water. Well, there is 
always somebody waiting to turn water into money and 
if it can be shown to be true the money will soon be found 
to back those who want to grow cotton. 

The Forest Fires 

Nothing so thoroughly attacks the wealth of a state that 

is rich in timber resources as to have wide-spread forest 

fires. And there is nothing in which the public has so large 

a share of blame as of profit. The people of this state have 

been very careless in the past and it is hoped the fires of 

this year and the losses entailed on the state thereby has 

taught us a salutary lesson. The woods and the prairies 

were never so dry as they are at the present time. The 

federal, state and the city and town authorities are trying 

to the best of their ability to prevent the setting of fires 

and they are attempting to keep the occurrence of fires 

down to the minimum. But the people can do more in 

the direction of elimination of fires than all of the officials 

put together if they will only show a willingness. 
* * * 

Cable and Wire 

The construction of a million dollar plant at Pittsburg 
for the California Wire and Cable Company will begin al- 
most immediately. This information comes from Otis I.ove- 
ridge. who is a Pittsburg banker and who is as well a rep- 
resentative of the A. A. Hooper Company's interests. The 
factory will be located adjoining the acreage which was 
recently acquired for the addition to the plant of the Co- 
lumbia Steel Company. 

Idea! shipping facilities exist at the point selected for 
the factory and to these may be added the fact that copper 
and steel products may easily be obtainable from the Co- 
lumbia Steel Company, thus making everything as conven- 
ient as could be desired. 



— The sermon. "There is no Death." preached by a San 
Francisco minister last Sunday, might easily be contro- 
verted by any of the score of prosperous local undertakers. 



OFFICES 

The Holbrook Building 



58 SUTTER STREET 

A Strictly First-Class Office Building 

Agent Room 411 



Municipal and Public Utility BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

Mills Building, San Francisco 
Fhone — Douglas 2244 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance 
Company in America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM. 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



July 26, 1924 



AND CALIF0RN1 \ ADVERTISER 



11 



Comments on Foreign Affairs 

Til \T it may be understood generally it should be made 
plain to the American people that, as far as the ex- 
ternal policies of France are concerned, there is very lit- 
tle difference of opinion between Poincare and Herriott. 
But within the scope of these policies, as generally ex- 
pressed and their practical application, there are worlds of 
difference. This is something not easily explained and it 
is very difficult for the average thinking- American to un- 
derstand how these differences occur and why. They are, 
in the lirst place, party differences and these partisan ideas 
call for sharp differences in treatment. Poincare and Her- 
riott are playing- for the public favor and the parties back- 
ing either aspirant are about equal in numbers. The policy 
of holding the Ruhr and any other part of Germany as a 
guaranty of payment of reparations is France's policy and 
not that of any politician or statesman. That is why the 
British Premier has made no progress with Herriott and 
is the reason, too, why he could make no progress with 
Poincare. 

The situation in Brazil and the revolutionary movement 
in Sao Paolo is an insignificant thing when the size of Bra- 
zil is taken in consideration. The Sao Paolo revolution- 
aries are reported, by those who should know best what 
the situation is, to be on the verge of a complete collapse. 

This is getting to be a very small world indeed and the 
achievements of the globe circling flyers goes far to make 
it still smaller than it was before and right on top of this 
comes forward the head of the Zeppelin firm who says that 
it is only a question of a very short time when the big 
dirigibles will be able to carry freight and passengers from 
one part of the world to the other in greater safety and 
with a curtailing of time in comparison with rail travel. 
Are we keeping pace with all this with the knowledge that 
is available to and possessed by the people as to foreign 
countries? 



THE FLIGHT OF TIME 

Tt has been said quite often that time is money and the 
flight of time may not be stopped. Time is flying in which 
many things might be done to bring about an end to the 
situation which now exists as to the relations of the Mu- 
nicipal to the Market Street Railway system. Both sys- 
tems, if united into one, might be made much more ser- 
viceable to the people. Many improvements could be in- 
telligently studied and these improvements might be made 
immediately instead of being- shelved for the time being 
or until such time as the city fathers make up their minds 
to take over the Market Street system. The loss through 
such a condition, while a direct loss to the companies, cer- 
tainly is also a loss to the people and it is an ever increas- 
ing one. A street railway should keep pace in its improve- 
ments and its expansions with the growth of a city. When 
a street railway stops meeting city expansion by additional 
facilities offered the people part of its usefulness has been 
lost. 



VACATION TIME 

IS 

FLASHLIGHT TIME 

Renew your batteries and bulbs before going away 

HETTY BROS. 

Headquarters For 

FLASHLIGHTS— BATTERIES— BULBS 

Free Flashlight Battery with every $3.00 sale or over 

during months of June and July. 



JACKIE COOGAN CHILD RELIEF 



On August 2nd there will start from l.os Angeles one 
oi the most interesting missions of mercy since the World 
War. when Jackie Coogan, noted juvejlile film star, de- 
parts over the Santa be for Chicago and New York to ia.il 
September 6th with the million dollar cargo of food and 
clothing for the starving children in the Far East. 

The boy star will officially represent America and will 
cross the Atlantic aboard the Leviathan. The cargo ship 
will sail on the same date and will go via Gibraltar and 
will land the supplies at Athens, as that is to be a depot. 
More than 100,000 refugee children are in Greece, while 
many more are at Constantinople. A relay station will be 
set up by the Americans at the Turkish Capitol, and from 
there food will be dispensed through the Bible Land, where 
the needy little ones will receive succor. 



— The choir were rehearsing a new setting of "Onward, 
Christian Soldiers" for the Sunday school anniversary. 

At verse three the choirmaster said, "Now, remember, 

only the trebles sing down to the gates of hell, and then 

you all come in !" 

* . . + 

A Weekly Excursion into the Realm of Learning 

The advantages of 

mi? (tea E HUltams tatititfr 

are now open to a limited number of San Francisco, 
Oakland and Alameda families. New dormitory system, 
carefully supervised. Pupils leave home Monday morn- 
ing and return Friday afternoon. 

From Fourth Grade. Accredited to the University of 
California. See representative at Children's Book Shop, 
474 Sutter Street, San Francisco, hours 3 to 5 p. m. 
daily. 



Cars Washed and Polished 

While You Wait, Neiu Process. Cars Called For and Delivered 

Without Additional Charge 

Simonizing U Flushing Top Dressing 

Super Glossing Greasing Crank Case Flushing 

Alemite Service 

Phone Graystone 970 
1430 Bush Street 



PALACE AUTO LAUNDRY 



John Eversman. Manager 



TUSTIN RADIO 

RADIO SAXrES— Receiving and Transmitting Specialist 
SUPPLIES — Special Radio apparatus built to order 

Service — Repairing — Inspection. We specialize in instal- 
ling Radio receiving sets in phonograph cabinets which 
insures a continuous entertainment. 

Phone Garfield <i972 
Our New Location — 128 Sutter Street San Francisco 



TAKE THIS FROM ME! 

Don't experiment with motor oils. 

Insist on a top-notch, satisfactory article, it's 

MONOGRAM 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 
RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS. FLUMES, 
PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 
San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles. Calif. 

444 Market St. 6717 Santa F« At*. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 26, 1924 




BUSY CUPID 

MISS ALICE REQUA. whose marriage to Mr. Coy Filmer, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. George Filmer of San Francisco, will be the 
first of the Autumn brides, on Tuesday, August 12. The 
wedding will be held at 4 o, clock in the afternoon at the Pied- 
mont Church, and later there will be a wedding supper and 
reception for the bridal party, relatives and a few close 
friends at the home of the bride's parents. Mr. and Mrs. 
Mark L Requa, in Piedmont. Mrs. John Henry Russell of 
Los Angeles, the former Miss Amy Requa, will be her sis- 
ter's matron of honor, and the maid of honor will be Miss 
Jessie Knowles. The bride's other attendants will be Miss 
Eleanor Spreckels, Miss Edna Taylor. Mrs. Lawrence Requa, 
Mrs. Salem Pohlman, Mrs. Russel Wilson, Miss Mary Julia 
Crocker. Miss Aileen Mcintosh, Miss Helen Stanford and Miss 
Edith Grant, who will arrive from Europe this week. Mr. 
Russell Wilson will be Mr. Filmer's best man. The ushers 
will be Mr. George Filmer Jr., Mr. Lawrence Requa, Mr. J. 
Leroy Nickel Jr., Mr. Tallant Tubbs, Mr. Leon Brooks Walker. 
Mr. William A. Magee Jr.. Mr. Covington Janin. Mr. John 
Henrv Russell of Los Aneeles and Mr. Douglas Alexander. 
MISS ESPERANCE GHIRARDELLI and Vernon Meredith Al- 
vord, whose betrothal was announced six weeks ago, will be 
wed Sunday. July 27, at the Ghirardelli summer home in 
San Mateo. Rev. Charles Deems of Trinity Church, San Fran- 
cisco, will read the marriage service. 
MISS RUTH RUDDOCK, daushter of Mr. and Mrs. George T. 
Ruddock, and James de Fremery were married on Satur- 
day at the Ruddock home across the bay. Both families have 
extensive business and social interests in San Francisco. The 
bride is a sister of Mrs. Georere A. Davies of Berkeley. Like 
her husband, she is a U. C. graduate. Mr. de Fremery is a 
son of Mrs. James de Fremery who is abroad for the summer. 
MISS MARGARET WEBSTER and Mr. William Norris King 
were married Wednesdav afternoon in the home of the bride's 
parents. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Webster, in Jackson street. 
Only relatives and a few close friends were present at the 
marriage, the company numbering 30 guests. Commander 
and Mrs. Starr Kinc. brother and sister-in-law of the groom, 
were unable to come out from Washington for the wedding. 
but the other members of his family were present, including 
his narents. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Randolph King, and his 
brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Boswell King. 
MISS JANE CARRIGAN has chosen Saturday. October 25, as the 
date for her marriage to Mr. James Athearn Folger. It will 
be a church wedding, celebrated at noon, but which church 
has not yet been determined upon. Afterward there will be 
a reception at the home of the bride's parents. Mr. and Mrs. 
Andrew Carrigan. in Walnut street. 
MISS DOROTHY ETHEL BARWISE. grand niece of Thornwall 
Mullally of this city and niece of Captain and Mrs. Nels West 
Lieberoth, now here, was married Tuesday to Lieutenant 
Frederick Mixon Harris, son of Mrs. Corra Harris of Georgia 
and well known fiction writer. The bride is a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Morris Bishop Barwise of New York 
and a grand-daughter of Judge and Mrs. Bailey Adger Mul- 
lally of Pendleton. S. C. The wedding took place at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ernest Stolling Sr. at Plainfield. 
N. J., the Stollings being aunt and uncle of the bride. The 
newlyweds will come to San Francisco on their honeymoon 
and will be at the Fairmont Hotel. 
MISS LOUISE WEIFER CARLISLE and W. Garner Smith's en- 
gagement was announced by Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Grafton 
Carlisle of Chicago, in that city Tuesday. Miss Carlisle has 
been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Beard in San Francisco 
at their home, 2610 Lake street, and has been much enter- 
tained during her stay in San Francisco. She returned East 
Tuesday. Miss Carlisle has also been a guest of the Paul 
Bancrofts at their Jackson street home. The wedding will 
take place in the fall. 

LUNCHEONS 

MISS MARGERY DAVIS entertained at a luncheon Friday in 
honor of Mrs. Francis Langton. who is visiting Mrs. Alfred 
de Ropp Jr. in Santa Barbara. 

MRS. WILLIAM LAWSON JR.. who is visiting here from Pasa- 
dena, was the guest of honor at a luncheon Tuesday at which 
Mrs. Alanson Weeks entertained. The luncheon was held at 
the home of the hostess. 

MISS MARION ZEILE was hostess Tuesdav at a luncheon party 
for her cousin. Mrs. J. Cheever Cowdin of New York. The 
party was at the Fairmont, where Miss Zeile makes her home. 



MISS EDNA TAYLOR gave an informal luncheon on Sunday at 
the Menlo Country Club when she entertained Mr. and Mrs 
Gerald Herrmann, Mr. and Mrs. Jerd Sullivan, Miss Doris 
Fagan, Mr. Edward Harrison Jr. and Mr. Bliss Rucker. 

MRS. RENNIE P. SCHWERIN was hostess at a luncheon given 
Tuesday at her home in San Mateo, where the guest of honor 
was Mrs. George T. Marve. 

MRS. CHARLES GOULD MORTON entertained at a luncheon on 
Sunday at the Morton country place in Los Gatos. The hos- 
tess spent the week-end in the country and returned Monday 
to Fort Mason. 

MRS. HERBERT DE LA MONTANYA was hostess at San Rafael 
to the visiting Italian, Countess Irene di Robilant. for whom 
she gave a small luncheon party 

MISS FRANCES STENT was given a goodbv luncheon party 
Monday by Miss Francesca Deering at the Deering home on 
Russian Hill. The Stent family leaves for Europe this week 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD BULLARD and Mr. and Mrs. Noble 
Hamilton entertained at a picnic Sunday afternoon in the 
grove of the Billiard place in San Rafael. 

MRS. RALSTON PAGE and Mrs. Dorothy Buckingham Page were 
hostesses at a luncheon Friday afternoon. The party was 
held at the Menlo Country Club. 

MRS. HARRY HILL had her niece. Miss Gladvs Quarre, Mrs Ala- 
son Weeks and Mrs. Archibald Johnson at lunch at the St 
Francis Monday. 

MRS. RICHARD McCREERY was hostess to a group including 
Mrs. Arthur Rose Vincent and Airs. Harry Scott at the St. 
Francis Monday. 

TEAS 

MRS. WILLIAM H. CROCKER extended the hospitality of her 
home Thursday in honor of Countess Irene di Robilant, when 
she gave a laree recention at "New Place" in Burlingame 

COUNTESS IRENE DE ROBILANT. who has been here for the 
past week, was entertained at a musicale and tea Sunday aft- 
ernoon by Mr. and Mrs. Matteo Sandona. 

BRIDGE 

MRS. PALMER COOKE of Los Angeles, who is house guest of 
Mrs. Gregory Jones, was entertained at a bridge tea Wednes- 
day afternoon at her home in Ross. 

MRS. REX SHERER entertained at bridge at San Rafael Wed- 
nesday, having twenty guests to meet Mrs. J. A. Reeds and 
Miss Mary Pentz of New York, the sister of Mr. William 
Pentz and Miss Anne Pentz of San Rafael. 

MR. AND MRS. HARRY EAST MILLER and Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Stringham will entertain at a bridge party and supper on 
Friday evening. August 1. The affair will be held at the 
residence of the Stringhams in Berkeley. 

DINNERS 

DR. HENRY S. PRICHETT was the guest of honor at a dinner 
at which Dr. Grant Selfridge entertained Monday evening at 
his home in Green street. Only men were present at the 
affair. 

MISS FRANCESCA DEERING entertained at an informal dinner 
Wednesday evening at the Hotel St. Francis and afterwards 
the young people danced to the playing of the Isham Jones 
orchestra. Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Deering chaperoned the 
party. 

MR. AND MRS. LATHAM McMULLIN were hosts at a dinner and 
theater party on Monday evening, the guests of honor hav- 
ing been Mr. and Mrs. Frederick McNear, who will leave early 
in August on a trip to Honolulu. The dinner was held at the 
St. Francis and later the McMullins and their guests attended 
the performance at the Curran. 

MISS HELEN MARYE was the guest of honor at a welcome home 
party, which was given Monday evening by Mr. John Breeden 
at the Hotel St. Francis. 

MR. AND MRS. J. CHEEVER COWDIN, who are here after an 
absence of two years or so, were guests of honor at a dinner 
party given by Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Lowery Monday night, 
with an evening at the Curran Theater following. 

IN TOWN AND OUT 

MRS. CHARLES HENDERSON has been spending several days 
at Lake Tahoe. where she is the guest of Mrs. John S. Drum 
at her country place. 

MR. AND MRS. H. MEYER WOOD have returned to their home 
in Jackson street after a sojourn of four months in Europe. 

MR. AND MRS. LOUIS JEFFERYS have taken an apartment in 
Union street near Broderick, which was formerly occupied 
by Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Gibson. Since their marriage sev- 
eral months ago the Jefferys have been living in Tavlor street 

MR. AND MRS. E. CLEMENS HORST and their family have re- 
turned to their home in Presidio Terrace from a visit of ser- 
eral days at the Feather River Inn. 

MRS. WILLIAM B. TUBBS and Miss Emelie Tubbs have post- 
poned their return to San Francisco until the end of August. 
They have been at San Ysidro Rancho since the early sum- 
mer. 



July 26, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



MR. AND MRS. ROSS AMBLER CURRAN and the hitter's son. 
Mr. Clarence Postley, left Burlingame Friday for a trip to 
Lake Tahoe. 

MR. AND MRS. ALFRED GHIRARDELL] and little Miss 
Polly Ghirardelli Will return next week to their home in Pa- 
ciflc avenue, after haying enjoyed the past month in Belvedere. 

MR. AND MRS. SPENCER GRANT returned to San Francisco on 
Sunday Hum their wedding trip, which was spent abroad, 
and are at their home in Pacific avenue. 

DH. AND MRS. H. E. ALDERSON and their small daughter are 
at the Hotel Virginia. Long Beach, for the month. 

MRS. AUGUSTUS FLETCHER and Miss Amy Fletcher have 
taken an apartment in Franklin street between Washington 
and Jackson, and they will make their permanent home in 
California. There are no definite plans as yet in regard to 
-Miss Fletcher's marriage to Ensign Robert Iverson Hicks II. 
but she expects that it will be celebrated here. 

MISS CLAUDINE SPRECKELS and Miss Frances Jolliffe are en- 
joying a visit at Lake Tahoe, where they are guests of Mrs. 
Herbert Moffitt. Mr. Walter Martin and his son are also 
spending several days at the Moffitt country place. 

MR. AND MRS. IRVING LUNDBORG and Miss Helen Lund- 
borg have gone to the Feather River Inn for a fortnight's 
visit. 

MRS. EDGAR DE PUE has gone to New York to be with her 
daughter, Mrs. Warren Matthews (Elva de Pue). Later on 
Mrs. de Pue will go abroad. 

MR. AND MRS. WILBERFORCE WILLIAMS are in the Feather 
river country, where they plan to pass several weeks in a 
horseback excursion into the wilds. They will return about 
August 2 0. 

MRS. ROBERT HAYS SMITH and her son. Master Nicol Smith, 
are in Santa Barbara, where they are the guests of Mrs. 
Eleanor Graham. They will remain in the South until the 
end of July. 

MR. AND MRS. LAURANCE SCOTT left several days ago for 
Grass Valley, where they are guests of Mrs. Arthur Rose Vin- 
cent at the Bourn ranch. 

MR. AND MRS. R. S. FAXON and family are guests, at the 
Feather River Inn. 

MR. AND MRS. CHILION HOWARD. Mrs. James P. Langhorne 
and Mr. James P. Langhorne are stopping at the San Ysidro 
Raneho, in Santa Barbara, for several weeks. They have joined 
Mrs. Richard Girvin and Miss Mary Eyre, who have been at 
the ranch for the past month. 

MISS EDITH BULL has concluded a visit of several weeks in 
Northern California, where she was the guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Bates, and she has returned to her apartment 
in Palo Alto. 

MRS. WILLIAM HINCKLEY TAYLOR is visiting in Portland as 
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Allen Lewis. 

MR. AND MRS. ALEXANDER LILLEY will give a week-end 
party at San Rafael this week to entertain the friends of their 
son, Neil Lilley, who is home over the summer vacation. 

MRS. CHARLES TEMPLETON CROCKER has . gone to Lake 
Tahoe to be a guest of Mr. and Mrs. George A. Pope, while 
Mr. Crocker is at the Bohemian Grove. 

MR, AND MRS. PAUL BANCROFT and their son. Paul Jr.. home 
from Yale over the vacation season, plan to sail for Hawaii 
in a few days to pass August at the islands. 

MR. AND MRS. LEIGH SYPHER, Mrs. Thomas Breeze and Mrs. 
R. P. Schwerin left Tuesday on a motor tour of the Tahoe 
country, ultimately making the Brockway Country Club their 
destination for a stay of a couple of weeks. 

MISS EDITH GRANT and Miss Mary Emma Flood will return 
Sunday to California after an absence of three months in Eu- 
rope. They returned last week on the Majestic and Mrs. 
.lames L. Flood went to the Atlantic coast to meet her daugh- 
ter and Miss Grant. 

MR. AND MRS. J. A. McC.REGOR have taken apartments at the 
Hotel Rafael for the season. 



MR. AND MRS. BARNABY CONRAD have returned to their home 
in town from Santa Barbara, when, they spent a fortnight 
with Mr. Conrad's mother, .Mrs. George Choate Kendall, and 
.Mr. Kendall. On their way ninth the Conrnds spent the week- 
end at Del Monte. 

MI!. AND MRS. McMULLIN and their daughter. Miss Virginia 
McMullin, will leave August 1 for the Feather River Inn, 
where they will spend a fortnight. 

INTIMATIONS 

MR. AND MRS. CHRISTIAN GROSS have taken an apartment 
in Paris, where they will reside indefinitely. Mr. Gross is at- 
tached to the American Embassy there as third secretary. 
Mrs. Gross was the former Miss Virginia Harrison of New- 
York, and is well known to San Francisco and peninsula so- 
ciety, where she and her sister frequently visited as guests 
of their uncle, Mr. Charles Templeton Crocker. 

MR. AND MRS. CYRIL CORNWALLIS-STEVENSON are receiv- 
ing congratulations on the birth of a son, which occurred 
last Friday. Mrs. Cornwallis-Stevenson was formerly Miss 
Cornelia Gwynne. 

ADMIRAL AND MRS. WILLIAM F. FULLAM have closed their 
home in Washington and have gone to Newport for the sum- 
mer season. 

MR. AND MRS. EDMUNDS LYMAN, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hill 
Vincent and Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron are a group of 
Californians who are touring Italy together. At present the 
party is in Venice. 

THE MISSES MARIANNE AND KATHERINE KUHN, away from 
here for a year or longer and starring in society in the East 
and elsewhere, were in town Monday meeting friends among 
the fashionables at the Hotel St. Francis. 

JAMES WILDER JR., who has been attending Oxford Univers- 
ity, will arrive this week to join his sister, Miss Kinau Wilder, 
who is here buying her trousseau. With Miss Barbara Ballou 
they will sail July 30 for Honolulu. 

MISS LOUISE BULLOCK will be away for the next two years 
or so on a tour of the world. She is en route this week to 
Java where she will visit Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Doyer, a de- 
lightful Dutch couple who visited San Francisco a year or so 
ago. 

MRS. I. N. WALTER, who injured her hip several months ago, 
is still confined to her home in Franklin street. While her 
physicians are much encouraged with the knitting of the frac- 
tured bones, they do not promise complete recovery for at 
least another six months. 

THE FORMALITIES have been concluded for Miss Helen Marye's 
presentation at the first court of the 1925 season, this to be 
in May when King George and Queen Mary inaugurate the 
London social season. The Marye family will be abroad next 
year for this reason. 

LIEUTENANT COMMANDER AND MRS. E. R. WILSON are be- 
ing congratulated on the birth of a son. 

DEL MONTE 

SAN FRANCISCANS AT Hotel Del Monte for the past week-end 
include: Mr. and Mrs. Warren Speiker, Mrs. Sidney Ballou, 
Mrs. V. K. Maddox and Know Maddox. Mrs. Joseph Di Gior- 
gio, Mr, and Mrs. Joseph E. Rucker Jr., Mr. and Mrs. E. M. 
Greene, Mr. and Mrs. J. Warren Dutton. 

THE BIRTHDAY OF Mrs. S. F. B. Morse. Pebble Beach, was the 
incentive for a merry party Friday night in the Morse home. 
The guests included Mr. and Mrs. Francis McComas, Mrs. 
Maurice Heckscher and Mrs. J. B. Hough of New York. 

MRS. G. MAURICE HECKSCHER. Mrs. J. B. Hough and Mrs. 
Frances S. Whitton of New York City, who recently joined 
the Pebble Beach colony for the summer, were honored by 
Miss Marion Hollins, of Islip, L. I., at a dinner party Sunday 
night at Del Monte Lodge. 

LT. COL. AND MRS. ROBERT A. ROOS. San Francisco, enter- 
tained a number of the army set Sunday night at Del Monte 
Lodge. 



STAGE Training 

NATHANIEL ANDERSON 
Coach 

Director — Pacific Players 

THE LEGITIMATE WAY 

This is actual practice; no theory nor 

false methods; vital; professional. 

STUDIO 

506 Kohler & Chase BUIg. 

Kearny 5454 



—Officer 666— Who is the guy that 
is butting his head up against the walls 
of the padded cell? Officer 555— He is 
a bootlegger. "What's wrong; with 
him?" "He sold a guy some imitation 
l„„, zt . — " "Uh, huh -" "And the guy 
paid him with counterfeit money." — 
Youngstown Telegram. 

— Business was none too hrisk with 
the village doctor. "Sir." said the maid. 
a- she entered his surgery, "some hoys 
are in the orchard eating your green 
applies. Shall I drive them away?" 
And the doctor answered "No." 



KECK 'S 

Prescription Pharmacies 

"Keek's Way Is the Safe Way" 

Three Pharmacies 
Fifth Floor, I 35 Stockton St. 

Second Floor, 209 Post St. 

Second Floor, 240 Stockton St. 

San Francisco 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 26, 1024 




ocier 




BUSY CUPID 

MISS ALICE REQUA. whose marriage to Mr. Coy Filmer, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. George Filmer of San Francisco, will be the 
first of the Autumn brides, on Tuesday, August 12. The 
wedding will be held at 4 o, clock in the afternoon at the Pied- 
mont Church, and later there will be a wedding supper and 
reception for the bridal party, relatives and a few close 
friends at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Mark L Requa, in Piedmont. Mrs. John Henry Russell of 
Los Angeles, the former Miss Amy Requa, will be her sis- 
ter's matron of honor, and the maid of honor will be Miss 
Jessie Knowles. The bride's other attendants will be Miss 
Eleanor Spreckels, Miss Edna Taylor. Mrs. Lawrence Requa, 
Mrs. Salem Pohlman, Mrs. Russe] Wilson, Miss Mary Julia 
Crocker, Miss Aileen Mcintosh, Miss Helen Stanford and Miss 
Edith Grant, who will arrive from Europe this week. Mr. 
Russell Wilson will be Mr. Filmer's best man. The ushers 
will be Mr. George Filmer Jr., Mr. Lawrence Requa, Mr. J. 
Leroy Nickel Jr., Mr. Tallant Tubbs, Mr. Leon Brooks Walker, 
Mr. William A. Magee Jr.. Mr. Covington Janin. Mr. John 
Henry Russell of Los Angeles and Mr. Douglas Alexander. 
MISS ESPERANCE GHIRARDELLI and Vernon Meredith Al- 
vord, whose betrothal was announced six weeks ago, will be 
wed Sunday, July 27, at the Ghirardelli summer home in 
San Mateo. Rev. Charles Deems of Trinity Church, San Fran- 
cisco, will read the marriage service. 
MISS RUTH RUDDOCK, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Georee T. 
Ruddock, and James de Fremery "were married on Satur- 
day at the Ruddock home across the bay. Both families have 
extensive business and social interests in San Francisco. The 
bride is a sister of Mrs. George A. Davies of Berkeley. Like 
her husband, she is a U. C. graduate. Mr. de Fremery is a 
son of Mrs. James de Fremerv who is abroad for the summer. 
MISS MARGARET WEBSTER and Mr. William Norris King 
were married Wednesdav afternoon in the home of the bride's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Webster, in Jackson street. 
Only relatives and a few close friends were present at the 
marriage, the company numbering 30 guests. Commander 
and Mrs. Starr King, brother and sister-in-law of the groom, 
were unable to come out from Washington for the wedding, 
but the other members of his family were present, including 
his narents. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Randolph King, and his 
brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Boswell King. 
MISS JANE CARRIGAN has chosen Saturday. October 25, as the 
date for her marriage to Mr. James Athearn Folger. It will 
be a church wedding, celebrated at noon, but which church 
has not yet been determined upon. Afterward there will be 
a reception at the home of the bride's parents. Mr. and Mrs. 
Andrew Carrigan. in Walnut street. 
MISS DOROTHY ETHEL BARWISE, grand niece of Thornwall 
Mullally of this city and niece of Captain and Mrs. Nels West 
Lieberoth, now here, was married Tuesday to Lieutenant 
Frederick Mixon Harris, son of Mrs. Corra Harris of Georgia 
and well known fiction writer. The bride is a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Morris Bishop Barwise of New York 
and a grand-daughter of Judge and Mrs. Bailey Adger Mul- 
lally of Pendleton, S. C. The wedding took place at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ernest Stolling Sr. at Plainfield. 
N. J., the Stollings being aunt and uncle of the bride. The 
newlyweds will come to San Francisco on their honeymoon 
and will be at the Fairmont Hotel. 
MISS LOUISE WEIFER CARLISLE and W. Garner Smith's en- 
gagement was announced by Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Grafton 
Carlisle of Chicago, in that city Tuesday. Miss Carlisle has 
been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Beard in San Francisco 
at their home, 2610 Lake street, and has been much enter- 
tained during her stay in San Francisco. She returned East 
Tuesday. Miss Carlisle has also been a guest of the Paul 
Bancrofts at their Jackson street home. The wedding will 
take place in the fall. 

LUNCHEONS 

MISS MARGERY DAVIS entertained at a luncheon Friday in 
honor of Mrs. Francis Langton, who is visiting Mrs. Alfred 
de Ropp Jr. in Santa Barbara. 

MRS. WILLIAM LAWSON JR.. who is visiting here from Pasa- 
dena, was the guest of honor at a luncheon Tuesday at which 
Mrs. Alanson Weeks entertained. The luncheon was held at 
the home of the hostess. 

MISS MARION ZEILE was hostess Tuesday at a luncheon party 
for her cousin. Mrs. J. Cheever Cowdin of New York. The 
party was at the Fairmont, where Miss Zeile makes her home. 



MISS EDNA TAYLOR gave an informal luncheon on Sunday at 
the Menlo Country Club when she entertained Mr. and Mrs 
Gerald Herrmann, Mr. and Mrs. Jerd Sullivan, Miss Doris 
Fagan. Mr. Edward Harrison Jr. and Mr. Bliss Rucker. 

MRS. RENNIE P. SCHWERIN was hostess at a luncheon given 
Tuesday at her home in San Mateo, where the guest of honor 
was Mrs. George T. Marye. 

MRS. CHARLES GOULD MORTON entertained at a luncheon on 
Sunday at the Morton country place in Los Gatos. The hos- 
tess spent the week-end in the country and returned Monday 
to Fort Mason. 

MRS. HERBERT DE LA MONTANYA was hostess at San Rafael 
to the visiting Italian. Countess Irene di Robilant. for whom 
she gave a small luncheon party. 

MISS FRANCES STENT was given a goodby luncheon party 
Monday by Miss Francesca Deering at the Deering home on 
Russian Hill. The Stent family leaves for Europe this week 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD BULLARD and Mr. and Mrs. Noble 
Hamilton entertained at a picnic Sunday afternoon in the 
grove of the Bullard place in San Rafael. 

MRS. RALSTON PAGE and Mrs. Dorothy Buckingham Page were 
hostesses at a luncheon Friday afternoon. The party was 
held at the Menlo Country Club. 

MRS. HARRY HILL had her niece. Miss Gladys Quarre, Mrs. Ala- 
son Weeks and Mrs. Archibald Johnson at lunch at the St. 
Francis Monday. 

MRS. RICHARD McCREERY was hostess to a group including 
Mrs. Arthur Rose Vincent and Mrs. Harry Scott at the St 
Francis Monday. 

TEAS 

MRS. WILLIAM H. CROCKER extended the hospitality of her 
home Thursday in honor of Countess Irene di Robilant, when 
she gave a laree reception at "New Place" in Burlingame 

COUNTESS IRENE DE ROBILANT. who has been here for the 
past week, was entertained at a musicale and tea Sunday aft- 
ernoon by Mr. and Mrs. Matteo Sandona. 

BRIDGE 

MRS. PALMER COOKE of Los Angeles, who is house guest of 
Mrs. Gregory Jones, was entertained at a bridge tea Wednes- 
day afternoon at her home in Ross. 

MRS. REX SHERER entertained at bridge at San Rafael Wed- 
nesday, having twenty guests to meet Mrs. J. A. Reeds and 
Miss Mary Pentz of New York, the sister of Mr. William 
Pentz and Miss Anne Pentz of San Rafael. 

MR. AND MRS. HARRY EAST MILLER and Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Stringham will entertain at a bridge party and supper on 
Friday evening. August 1. The affair will be held at the 
residence of the Stringhams in Berkeley. 

DINNERS 

DR. HENRY S. PRICHETT was the guest of honor at a dinner 
at which Dr. Grant Selfridge entertained Monday evening at 
his home in Green street. Only men were present at the 
affair. 

MISS FRANCESCA DEERING entertained at an informal dinner 
Wednesday evening at the Hotel St. Francis and afterwards 
the young people danced to the playing of the Isham Jones 
orchestra. Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Deering chaperoned the 
party. 

MR. AND MRS. LATHAM McMULLIN were hosts at a dinner and 
theater party on Monday evening, the guests of honor hav- 
ing been Mr. and Mrs. Frederick McNear. who will leave early 
in August on a trip to Honolulu. The dinner was held at the 
St. Francis and later the McMullins and their guests attended 
the performance at the Curran. 

MISS HELEN MARYE was the guest of honor at a welcome home 
party, which was given Monday evening by Mr. John Breeden 
at the Hotel St. Francis. 

MR. AND MRS. J. CHEEVER COWDIN, who are here after an 
absence of two years or so, were guests of honor at a dinner 
party given by Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Lowery Monday night, 
with an evening at the Curran Theater following. 

IN TOWN AND OUT 

MRS. CHARLES HENDERSON has been spending several days 
at Lake Tahoe, where she is the guest of Mrs. John S. Drum 
at her country place. 

MR. AND MRS. H. MEYER WOOD have returned to their home 
in Jackson street after a sojourn of four months in Europe. 

MR. AND MRS. LOUIS JEFFERYS have taken an apartment in 
Union street near Broderick. which was formerly occupied 
by Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Gibson. Since their marriage sev- 
eral months ago the Jefferys have been living in Tavlor street 

MR. AND MRS. E. CLEMENS HORST and their family have re- 
turned to their home in Presidio Terrace from a visit of ser- 
eral days at the Feather River Inn. 

MRS. WILLIAM B. TUBBS and Miss Emelie Tubbs have post- 
poned their return to San Francisco until the end of August. 
They have been at San Ysidro Rancho since the early sum- 
mer. 



Tulv 26, 1"24 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



MR, AND MRS. ROSS AMBLER CURRAN and the hitter's son. 
Mr. Clarence Postley, left Burlingame Friday for a trip to 
Lake Tahoe. 

MR. AND MRS. ALFRED GHIRARDELL] and little .Miss 
Polly Ghirardelll will return next week to their home in Pa- 
cific avenue, after having enjoyed the past month in Belvedere. 

MR. AND MRS. SPENCER GRANT returned to San Francisco on 
Sunday from their wedding trip, which was spent abroad, 
and are at their home in Pacific avenue. 

DR. AND -MRS. H. E. ALDERSON and their small daughter are 
at the Hotel Virginia, Long Beach, for the month. 

MRS. AUGUSTUS FLETCHER and Miss Amy Fletcher have 
taken an apartment in Franklin street between Washington 
and Jackson, and they will make their permanent home in 
California. There are no definite plans as yet in regard to 
Miss Fletcher's marriage to Ensign Robert Iverson Hicks II, 
but she expects that it will be celebrated here. 

MISS CLAUDINE SPRECKELS and Miss Frances Jolliffe are en- 
joying a visit at Lake Tahoe, where they are guests of Mrs. 
Herbert Moffitt. Mr. Walter Martin and his son are also 
spending several days at the Moffitt country place. 

MR. AND MRS. IRVING 1/UNDBORG and Miss Helen Lund- 
borg have gone to the Feather River Inn for a fortnight's 
visit. 

MRS. EDGAR DE PUE has gone to New York to be with her 
daughter. Mrs. Warren Matthews (Elva de Pue). Later on 
Mrs. de Pue will go abroad. 

MR. AND MRS. WILBERFORCE WILLIAMS are in the Feather 
river country, where they plan to pass several weeks in a 
horseback excursion into the wilds. They will return about 
August 2 0. 

MRS. ROBERT HAYS SMITH and her son. Master Nicol Smith, 
are in Santa Barbara, where they are the guests of Mrs. 
Eleanor Graham. They will remain in the South until the 
end of July. 

MR. AND MRS. LAURANCE SCOTT left several days ago for 
Grass Valley, where they are guests of Mrs. Arthur Rose Vin- 
cent at the Bourn ranch. 

MR. AND MRS. R. S. FAXON and family are guests, at the 
Feather River Inn. 

MR. AND MRS. CHILION HOWARD, Mrs. James P. Langhorne 
and Mr. James P. Langhorne are stopping at the San Ysidro 
Rancho, in Santa Barbara, for several weeks. They have joined 
Mrs. Richard Girvin and Miss Mary Eyre, who have been at 
the ranch for the past month. 

MISS EDITH BULL has concluded a visit of several weeks in 
Northern California, where she was the guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Bates, and she has returned to her apartment 
in Palo Alto. 

MRS. WILLIAM HINCKLEY TAYLOR is visiting in Portland as 
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Allen Lewis. 

MR. AND MRS. ALEXANDER LILLEY will give a week-end 
party at San Rafael this week to entertain the friends of their 
son, Neil Lilley, who is home over the summer vacation. 

MRS. CHARLES TEMPLETON CROCKER has. gone to Lake 
Tahoe to be a guest of Mr. and Mrs. George A. Pope, while 
Mr. Crocker is at the Bohemian Grove. 

MR. AND MRS. PAUL BANCROFT and their son, Paul Jr.. home 
from Vale over the vacation season, plan to sail for Hawaii 
in a few days to pass August at the islands. 

MR. AND MRS. LEIGH SYPHER, Mrs. Thomas Breeze and Mrs. 
R. P. Schwerin left Tuesday on a motor tour of the Tahoe 
country, ultimately making the Brockway Country Club their 
destination for a stay of a couple of weeks. 

MISS EDITH GRANT and Miss Mary Emma Flood will return 
Sunday to California after an absence of three months in Eu- 
rope. They returned last week on the Majestic and Mrs. 
James L. Flood went to the Atlantic coast to meet her daugh- 
ter and Miss Grant. 

MR. AND MRS. J. A. MCGREGOR have taken apartments at the 
Hotel Rafael for the season. 



MR. AXD MRS. BARNABY CONRAD have returned to their home 
in town from Santa Barbara, where they spent a fortnight 
with Mr. Conrad's mother, Mrs. George Choate Kendall, and 
Mr. Kendall. On their way north the Conrads spent the week- 
end at Del Monte. 

Mi; AXD MRS. MoMULLIN and their daughter, Miss Virginia 
McMullin, will leave August 1 for the Feather River Inn, 
where they will spend a fortnight. 

INTIMATIONS 

MR. AND MRS. CHRISTIAN GROSS have taken an apartment 
in Paris, where they will reside indefinitely. Mr. Gross is at- 
tached to the American Embassy there as third secretary. 
Mrs. Gross was the former Miss Virginia Harrison of New 
York, and is well known to San Francisco and peninsula so- 
ciety, where she and her sister frequently visited as guests 
of their uncle, Mr. Charles Templeton Crocker. 

MR. AND MRS. CYRIL CORNWALLIS-STEVENSON are receiv- 
ing congratulations on the birth of a son, which occurred 
last Friday. Mrs. Cornwallis-Stevenson was formerly Miss 
Cornelia Gwynne. 

ADMIRAL AND MRS. WILLIAM F. FULLAM have closed their 
home in Washington and have gone to Newport for the sum- 
mer season. 

MR. AND MRS. EDMUNDS LYMAN, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hill 
Vincent and Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron are a group of 
Californians who are touring Italy together. At present the 
party is in Venice. 

THE MISSES MARIANNE AND KATHERINE KUHN, away from 
here for a year or longer and starring in society in the East 
and elsewhere, were in town Monday meeting friends among 
the fashionables at the Hotel St. Francis. 

JAMES WILDER JR.. who has been attending Oxford Univers- 
ity, will arrive this week to join his sister, Miss Kinau Wilder, 
who is here buying her trousseau. With Miss Barbara Ballou 
they will sail July 30 for Honolulu. 

MISS LOUISE BULLOCK will be away for the next two years 
or so on a tour of the world. She is en route this week to 
Java where she will visit Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Doyer, a de- 
lightful Dutch couple who visited San Francisco a year or so 
ago. 

MRS. I. N. WALTER, who injured her hip several months ago, 
is still confined to her home in Franklin street. While her 
physicians are much encouraged with the knitting of the frac- 
tured bones, they do not promise complete recovery for at 
least another six months. 

THE FORMALITIES have been concluded for Miss Helen Marye's 
presentation at the first court of the 1925 season, this to be 
in May when King George and Queen Mary inaugurate the 
London social season. The Marye family will be abroad next 
year for this reason. 

LIEUTENANT COMMANDER AND MRS. E. R. WILSON are be- 
ing congratulated on the birth of a son. 

DEL MONTE 

SAN FRANCISCANS AT Hotel Del Monte for the past week-end 
include: Mr. and Mrs. Warren Speiker, Mrs. Sidney Ballou, 
Mrs. V. K. Maddox and Know Maddox. Mrs. Joseph Di Gior- 
gio, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Rucker Jr., Mr. and Mrs. E. M. 
Greene. Mr. and Mrs. J. Warren Dutton. 

THE BIRTHDAY OF Mrs. S. F. B. Morse. Pebble Beach, was the 
incentive for a merry party Friday night in the Morse home. 
The guests included Mr. and Mrs. Francis McComas, Mrs. 
Maurice Heckscher and Mrs. J. B. Hough of New York. 

MRS. G. MAURICE HECKSCHER. Mrs. J. B. Hough and Mrs. 
Frances S. Whitton of New York City, who recently joined 
the Pebble Beach colony for the summer, were honored by 
Miss Marion Hollins, of Islip. L. I., at a dinner party Sunday 
night at Del Monte Lodge. 

LT. COL. AND MRS. ROBERT A. ROOS. San Francisco, enter- 
tained a number of the army set Sunday night at Del Monte 
Lodge. 



STAGE Training 

NATHANIEL ANDERSON 
Coach 

Director — Pacific Players 

THE LEGITIMATE WAY 

This is actual practice; no theory nor 
false methods; vital; professional. 

STUDIO 

506 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Kearny 5454 



—Officer 666-— Who is the guy that 
is butting his head up against the walls 
of the padded cell? Officer 555— He is 
a bootlegger. "What's wrong- with 
him?" "He sold a guy some imitation 
booze—" "l'h. huh—' "And the guy 
paid him with counterfeit money." — 
Youngstown Telegram. 

— Business was none too brisk with 
the village doctor. "Sir." said the maid, 
as she entered his surgery, "some boys 
are in the orchard eating your green 
applies. Shall I drive them away?" 
And the doctor answered "No.' 



KECK'S 

Prescription Pharmacies 

"Keek's Way Is the Safe Way" 

Three Pharmacies 
Fifth Floor, 1 35 Stockton St. 

Second Floor. 209 Post St. 

Second Floor, 240 Stockton St. 

San Francisco 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 26, 1924 




IP^P^TtfBL£ 



By KEM 

"There is no Past, so long as books shall live." — Lord Lytton. 

PROUD FLESH by Lawrence Rising is just out, and 
is one of the novels to make the past of San Francisco — 
a living present, and also succeeds in making the present, 
a very vivid, picturesque reality. The story of early San. 
Francisco, of the forty-niners and their sons and daughters 
and of the third generation has been done often before by 
very gifted writers; Gertrude Atherton in SISTERS-IN- 
LAW; Stewart Edward White in GRAY DAWN; Charles 
Caldwell Dobie in BLOOD RED DAWN; Jerome A. Hart 
in THE GOLCOXDA BONANZA; Gelett Burgess in 
THE HEART LINE, and many others have given us dif- 
ferent angles of "the city loved around the world," and 
now comes this young writer with a book that will worth- 
ily stand beside them. The fact that the author is a native 
son. and loves the setting for his theme, accounts partly for 
the fascination to be found in the first third of the book 
which is given up to the older generation, and the well- 
known history of the earthquake and fire. Our interest is 
held by what Grant Overton tells us some writers have, 
namely — "a kind of fertility like the fertility of a rich soil, 
an inexhaustible loam. The early Kipling had it. O. Henry 
had it." and Lawrence Rising is now discovered to have it. 
Therefore the pictures he gives us of Barbary Coast, "the 
riff-raff, the discarded, the ineffectual" — the painted women 
— the castaways of every race — "the men who kept their 
hands near their revolvers" make us feel this is truly old- 
time San Francisco, and all the sordidness, sorrow and de- 
pravity are illuminated for us by the heroism of Wong 
Vet. servant of Ferdinand Borel, and a loyal gentleman, 
the finest character given us in the book. We ask ourselves 
when all the principal characters are wiped or aged out 
of the stage center, who will now hold our interest? And be- 
hold ! on come the present generation. Fernanda Borel, 
brought up like a young Princess, returns from the conti- 
nent and is rushed into a tropical love affair with an "or- 
ange-red-haired young Irishman, a plumber, who has forced 
his way into San Francisco's most exclusive set. To quote 
Gertrude Atherton's review in the International — Literary 
Digest — "Patrick O'Malley is a character to bring joy to 
the heart of the proletariat. If there reallv are O'Malleys 
in San Francisco, let us have them in society as quickly as 
possible. Snobbery could never stand up against them." 
Certainly Patrick is an original and tempestuous wooer, 
and these lovers, with all the spirit of their pioneer fore- 
fathers, engage our attention, till keyed-up and breathless 
we close with approval what the publishers tell us is a 
"California Epic." 
Boni, Liveright, $2. 

* * * 

The new Kathleen Xorris hook to be out in the Fall is 

called "ROSE OF THE WORLD,"— Gladys Johnson's 

new book soon to be on the stalls is a thrilling mystery 

called MOON COUNTRY, and Charles Caldwell Dobie 

has a short storv in the Tulv number of Harpers Magazine. 
*' * * 

The CaliforniaWriters Club is active as usual — just at this 
time the activity taking the form of a picnic at the resi- 
dence of Charles Keeler, author of SEQUOIA SONNETS, 
July 19th. at his residence in Berkeley. 

About two hundred writers, near-writers, poets and their 
admiring friends were present. Along terraced steps flanked 
by multi-colored giant hollyhocks sat the fortunate guests. 
First, they were served with a dainty outdoor feast. The 
large number required extra waiters and John H. Hamlin, 



writer of stirring Western stories, Jack Wilson, and Mr. 
G. West gallantly volunteered to act as Ganymedes pacing 
the terraced steps with cups of hot coffee and chocolate 
for these modern literary gods and goddesses of California. 
The Feast of Reason followed ; the guest of honor, Pro- 
fessor George Pierce Baker of Harvard, gave a witty stim- 
ulating talk after a happy introduction by Mr. Keeler and 
Dr. George B. Woods, Professor of English from Carleton 
College, Minn. Dr. Louis Cazamian of the University of 
Paris, also his wife, spoke and Charmain London followed 
with an intimate little talk about her late husband's last 
story which is to be published in September Cosmopolitan. 
Anna Blake Mezquida manipulated a happy turn to the pro- 
gram, and Mr. Charles Keeler was repeatedly called upon 
for recitations of his poems, which he gave with much elo- 
quence and fire pacing his grassy lawn under the redwoods. 
The last number was appropriately and charmingly given 
by Mrs. Walter Raymond Jones, who recited her poem, 
beginning with the verse: 
"Heigh ho ! 

Would you a-roaming go 

Where wealth and romance lure? 

In the city of charm by the Golden Gate 

Lies the World in miniature." 
which has just been published in an artistic little Cali- 
fornia souvenir booklet. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell Sts. 




MART HERETH 



CAROLINE JONES 



Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30, 
and tea from 3 to 5 



'^ina^* 334 SUITER STREET Douglas 7118 



"Mayerle Glasses' 

Correct Astigmatism 
Relieve Eye Strain 

Scientific Eye Examination 
2 9 Years- E«ta.l« a Optlc.l Practice In QQQ Market St. 




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712 Market St., Phone Garfield 4560 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

WHY 

(It's the water and the table) 
Located in the Valley of the Moon, close to General Vallejo and Jack 
London's homes: golf links close by; sulphur water swimming: poot, 
65x85, and private tub baths : fireproof hotel. If you want health 
and rest, give us a trial. Write for booklet. T. H. CORCORAN, Prop. 
See Peck-Judah. Agua Caliente. Sonoma Co. 




Tel. Kearny 3 65 



i 



655 Sacramento St. 

Bet. Kearny and Montgomery Sts 



;: s ;: :: a >: « ggg.lt ggggg ggggggggffiggl 

Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

* PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco 

HgHBHHBlBHggggggggggggSSSgggggggga 




July 26, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



+ 



& you pay no more^, 



BESTFLOWE^ 




"Thence of a Thousand Gardens' 

224-226 Grant Ave. Tel. Kearny 4975 



lacfl cor o/>erafed\^ 
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This means that you can 
dispense with all wor- 
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cars. Our drivers are 
careful and they never 
violate your desires for 
safety. 




Phone Franklin 317 

1639 Fine Street 

San Francisco 



^jffljH^ 



E,t*hi,*h.d 131+ 



Kelvinator 

Electric Refrigeration 

FOR THE HOME 









Arrange for a Kelvinator equipment for your 
lee box, it does away with ice and the muss. 
makea Ice cubes for your table, freezes sher- 
bets, puddings and salmis 

IVATKItlllH SE-«ll,fOX CO. 
523 Market St.. S. F. Tel. Sutter 1938 



fesf!SiS»ttej' 



DANIEL WEBSTER'S HORSES 
If when the wind blows, 
Rattling the trees, 
Clicking like skeletons' 
Elbows and knees, 

You hear along- the road 
Three horses pass, 
Do not go near the dark, 
Cold window-glass. 

If when the first snow lies 
Whiter than bones, 
You find the mark of hoofs 
Cut to the stones — 

Hoofs of three horses 
Going abreast, 
Turn about ! turn about ! 
A closed door is best. 

Upright in the earth, 
Under the sod, 
They buried three horses 
Bridled and shod, 

Daniel Webster's horses. 
He said as he grew old : 
"Flesh, I loved riding; 
Shall I not love it, cold? 

"Shall I not love to ride 
Bone astride bone, 
When the cold wind blows 
And snow covers stone? 

"Bury them on their feet 
With bridle and bit. 
' They were good horses. 
See their shoes fit." 

— Elizabeth J. Coatsworth, 

In Century Magazine. 



Be photographed tills year on your 
Birthday 



\ 

Studios In all Principal Cities of California] 
Oakland San Francisco | 
408 14th St. 41 Grant Aye.] 
•._.. — ,._._., — „ — ._.._.. .—— . « — •+ 



ONE MAN 

Three women had his secrets 

Hugged tight. 
Each, for that unique honor, 

In the night 
Stirred in her bed softly 

with delight. 
— Bell Turnbull. in Poetry. 



TO A HUMMING BIRD 

You are a jonquil 

That grew a wing 

And blew away 

On the winds 

Of Spring; 

While the others stay 

On the stem and sway 

In the old, 

Decorous way ! 

— Grace E. Hall. 

in Overland Monthly. 



\AMelands 



• new process does it? 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 
For particulars address 

SISTER SUP&RIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



SUMMONS 

In the Superior Court of the State of California 

in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. No. 147893. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and the complaint filed 
in the office of the County Clerk of said City 
and County. 

Mary Aruksar, Plaintiff, vs. Alexander Aruk- 
sar, Defendant. 

The People of the State of California Send 
Greeting's to : Alexander Aruksar. Defendant. 

V'uu are hereby required to appear in an ac- 
tion brought against you by the above-named 
Plaintiff in the Superior Court of the State of 
California, in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, and to answer the Complaint 
filed therein within ten days (exclusive of the 
day nf service) after the service on you of this 
summons, if served within this City and County; 
or if served elsewhere within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judg- 
ment and decree of this Court dissolving the 
bonds of matrimony now existing between 
plaintiff and defendant, on the ground of de- 
fendant's willful desertion, also for general re- 
lief, as will more fully appear in the Complaint 
on file, to which special reference is hereby 
made. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the said 
Plaintiff will take judgment for any money or 
damages demanded in the complaint as arising 
Upon contract or will apply to the Court for 
other relief demanded in the complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the Su- 
perior Court of the State of California, in and 
for the City and County of San Francisco, 

Dated June 24, 1924. 

H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
(Seal) By W. R. Castagnetto, Deputy Clerk. 

AUSTIN LEWIS. 

473 Mills Bldg.. San Francisco, Calif., 
Attorney for Plaintiff. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Entate of Paul Sodini, der?ti*<*il 
No. 29421. Dept. 9 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned. 
\Y. .]. Hynes. administrator of the estate of 
Paul Sodini. deceased, to the creditors of and all 
persons having claims against the said decedent, 
to file them with the necessary vouchers within 
four ( 4 ) months after the first publication of 
this notice, in the office of the Clerk of the Su- 
perior Court of the State of California, in and 
for the City and Countv of San Francisco, or to 
exhibit them with the necessary vouchers within 
four (4) months after the first publication of this 
notice to the said administrator, at his office. 858 
Phelan Building. San Francisco, California, 
which said last-named office the undersigned 
selects as his place of business in all matters 
connected with said estate of Paul Sodini, 
deceased. 

W. J. HYNES. 

Administrator of the Estate of Paul Sodini, 
deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, California, July 15. 1924. 
Cullinan & Hickey. 

Attorneys for Administrator. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 26, 1924 




LEj4SURE'SW4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURES 

Tom Moore. 



Conducted bv Thomas Ashe 



It is said upon the Rialto that under 
the direction of Mr. Wilkes, the Co- 
lumbia is soon to go into the "stock 
star" proposition; under Homer Cur- 
ran similar plans are being made for 
the Curran Theater. In this kind of 
stock productions, the "star" is a vis- 
iting actor of prominence in certain 
plays which are put on with the as- 
sistance or support of the local casts. 
It is an old method procedure, and has 
been known to California about thirty 
years ago. A great deal of Shake- 
speare was played here in this mannei 
of handling casts. The old days had 
this difference, however : The stars 
were not all. Today, there is always a 
star, and almost only a star, at least 
in the minds of the managers, who 
must have something they can adver- 
tise as a good name, very much in the 
manner of a well-stamped biscuit. 
Even the regular stock companies only 
advertise the leading man or woman, 
besides giving him about all the salary 
laid out, in their expense sheet, or 
"nut." We might suggest it is now a 
live time for a good all 'round com- 
pany of stock actors, or actors who 
will play in stock, without the over- 
played star. 

While the Columbia and the Curran 
Theaters will produce the legitimate 
drama, the Alcazar will continue with 
stock star musical comedy. 

Homer Curran and Louis O. Mac- 
loon, either for themselves or eastern 
interests, will handle the Capital, now 
playing pictures or closed, for attrac- 
tions sent here from the Atlantic. 

The gist of these rumors is that 
plans are meant to defeat in some way 
the efforts of the Actors' Equity Asso- 
ciation for a closed or what is called 
''Equity shop." That it can be done 
with the stock proposition is presum- 
able on the theory that with a sta- 
tionary company in most of the thea- 
ters, the managements can get enough 
actors to come here who are not mem- 
bers of the Equity association. 

— Nathaniel Anderson. 



Curran 

Many of the theatergoers thronging 
the Curran this week to witness 
"Spring Cleaning" are drawn there to 
see a screen celebrity in the flesh; here- 
after these will attend such engage- 
ments as she shall star in. to see Paul- 
ine Frederick — the splendid actress of 



the legitimate. For thousands of the 
merely curious are learning that Miss 
Frederick, in Lonsdale's comedy, dis- 
plays a degree of real artistry incap- 
able of being portrayed by her in the 
silent drama. The vehicle is termed 
"audacious" ; it is just frank, and a 
better sermon could not be preached 
in a church. There is plenty of de- 
lightful humor and satire; it is filled 
with snappy dialogue throughout its 
three exciting acts and is offered by 
an excellent company. Particularly is 
the part of Richard Sones, the hus- 
band, enacted by Cyril Keightley. 
splendidly portrayed. Pauline Fred- 
erick's return to the spoken plays is 
most auspicious and bodes well for a 
remarkable success. 



Orpheum 

John Steele's wonderful voice con- 
tinues to thrill Orpheum patrons this 
week — his third successive and suc- 
cessful one — and makes us wish he 
would stay longer. However, we can- 
not help resenting his mingling in with 
"group" acts of the other players — it 
seems to detract from the glory of his 
art. Jack Joyce. "The Boy with the 
Smile." is clever, though there is a 
certain gruesomeness about his exploit- 
ing (jf his misfortune. Lou Holze. in 
"Oh-Sole-Mio." is as tunny as he was 
last week, and — much the same. 
though his is a way that is infectious 
despite repetitions. Claude Anderson 
and Leona Yvel whirl themselves into 
favor via roller skates, tumbling, som- 
ersaulting, waltzing and generallv in- 
viting broken necks, while "Spring and 
the Moonlight," featuring Fritzi Bru- 
nette, is a one-act sketch very well 
played and of unusual theme. "Miss 
Syncopation" lias Blossom Seek-v. 
startling clothes, a beautiful setting, a 
good pianist and much that is unin- 
telligible, hut. it is ultra-syncopation 
and. somehow, interests — possibly 
through expectation of what might en- 
sue. Motion pictures of the Olympic 
games complete a good program. 



Strand 

The film at the Strand this week is 
fittingly captioned and a story emi- 
mently true to type. Claire Windsor, 
the beautiful rich girl whose bankrupt 
parents try to salvage their lost fortune 
by a brilliant marriage of their daugh- 
ter to a rich social climber, does as 



well as could be expected with such a 
role. Adolph Menjou acts the polish- 
ed, and, later, the Quixotic villian de- 
lightfully. The picture strikes a con- 
trasting note in its scenes of Paris 
night life in the cafes of the Mont- 
martre. The program includes another 
chapter of the Telephone Girl entitled 
"The Square Sex" and Rudy's Man- 
hattan Orchestra renders some beau- 
tiful selections, excellently played, par- 
ticularly "Tanhauser March"; "Leew- 
ellyn Walze," by Alex Halbman, saxa- 
phonist, and Rudolph's version of 
"Cavalleria Rusticiana" and World 
Xews Kinograms make up a very en- 
tertaining bill. Next week Lois 'Wil- 
son will be featured in "Another Scan- 
dal." 



Cameo 

Fandangoes and tangoes, clicking of 
castanets, old haciendas, village streets 
and patios, wild night riding of black- 
masked caballeros on white horses over 
moonlit mesas and mountains, the 
jealousy of dark-skinned, dark-eyed 
inamoratas, white-haired Senoras look- 
ing wistfully at Fiestas. — all these fas- 
cinating situations and attributes go 
to make up the Cameo's dashing little 
play this week, called "The Lightning 
Rider." There is not a single stupid 
moment in the whole picture; the plot 
is quite plausible and well carried out. 
and the acting of the heroine is as good 
as her beauty of person, which is say- 
ing a good deal. And show me any- 
one who could take the particular part 
of the hero any better than Harry 
Carey! In all. the Cameo lives up to 
the reputation which it has secured, of 
giving good, clean, sparkling plavs, a 
relief from the "sex problem plays" 
that glut the movie market. This Sat- 
urday comes "Pagan Passions." 
(Which may be a little different, eh?) 



Warfield 

Starting on Saturday the Warfield 
I heater will have the great star at- 
traction,— beautiful Corinne Griffith, 
this time featured in her new drama, 
"Single Wives." 

"Single Wives" tells a story of those 
lonely, heart sick and loyal women who 
are mated with a man who lias grown 
into a dollar mark and a business en- 
terprise sign — those men who are too 
busy to give to their wives just a frac- 
tion of the time they lavish upon the 
chasing of dollars. Sentiment— even 
love-— is forgotten and the woman pays 
in silence, — in silence until the "other 
man" appears. Then the awakening 
before it is too late. 

There will be manv stars in support 
of Miss Griffith— Milton Sills. Lou Tel- 
Iegen. Phyllis Haver. Kathlyn Wil- 
liams, Henry B. Walthall and fohn 
Patrick. Other shorter film subjects 
complete the program with Fanchon 
and Marco's "Ideas." 



Tulv 26, 1924 



SAX l-'R VNCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



The Romance and Reality of Paper Mill Creek I 



OF THE many larger cities of California and the West 
in general there are but few which may boast of hav- 
ing the wonderful estates within a very short distance in 
time from the business center of San Francisco. This has 
been true ever since San Francisco became a city but it 
is much truer today than it has ever been in the past, when 
the building of the Golden Gate bridge is taken into con- 
sideration. The building of this bridge will shorten the 
distance very materially between the metropolis and the 
magnificent residence sections of Marin County. 

There are a number of estates which have been held in- 
tact in Marin for many years which should prove intensely 
attractive to those who are seeking home and villa sites. 
One estate, the property of Mrs. Elizabeth Rodgers. is sit- 
uated along the banks of Paper Mill Creek, one of the most 
romantic streams in the state. The property follows the 
meanderings of Paper Mill Creek for more than five miles 
and every turn of the stream gives one a view of unparal- 
leled beauty. There are twenty-three hundred acres in the 
estate and on the property are located four railroad sta- 
tions. This is an unusual condition and one which adds 
to the attractiveness of the location. Some of the acreage 
is suitable for pasture land, some for agriculture, most of 
it is forested and there are innumerable home and villa 
sites. These home and villa sites are of such a character 
that nowhere around San Francisco they may be dupli- 
cated or even approached as to their marvelous sightliness 
and convenience, when one takes the distance from the 
city in consideration. Hazarding a guess at the value of 
the property, and basing this opinion on that of one who 
knows values in that part of Marin County, the value might 
be placed at a million dollars. It is more than probable 
that it could be bought for less than half that amount. 
Here is an opportunity waiting for the man of vision and 
brains to apply to the beatification and the sale of this 
land after having had it laid out in such a manner as not 
to interfere with the natural lay of it. Here you have a 
wonderful combination of the primitive with all of the lux- 
uries of the most refined surroundings. You have the for- 



est primeval and the open spaces, you have the green of 
the redwoods and the carpeting of the forest floor with 
the silence giving needles and you have the blue sky and 
the views to the deeps of woods, creeks and clearings. 

If the Paper Mill Creek property were situated as close 
to Chicago or New York as it is to San Francisco prob- 
ably no amount of money could tempt the owner to sell 
it or to consent to have it parcelled out to the seeker for 
a home or a villa site. 

The estate originally was one that witnessed all of the 
beauty of what we are pleased to term "Southern life." The 
owner, a noted lawyer, the husband of Mrs. Rodgers, main- 
tained his coach and four and drove over the roads of the 
magnificent domain. Every acre of the place has, in the 
past, had its romance and the future is full of promises of 
the same kind of pleasure for those who are to live there. 
Paper Mill Creek property beckons to those who have the 
ability to picture that which it may be and it is waiting for 
the magic touch of the man of intelligence and enterprise 
that it may become the most desired of all sections around 
San Francisco to those who are seeking homes in the great 
outdoors. 

There is always an appeal to the lover of Nature to find 
a proprietor who surrounds his acreage with the care that 
ensures keeping its loveliness unprofaned. No campers or 
hikers are allowed and every precaution that it is possible 
to prevent the destruction of plants and trees is taken and 
there is always the best of watchfulness to prevent the 
possibility of fires. 

Those who may be curious as to this property and who 
may wish further infomation regarding location or who 
may wish to investigate with a view to purchase may apply 
to the office of the NEWS LETTER, in the Russ Build- 
ing, San Francisco. 



— Mrs. Newly wed (tearfully): "My — my husband — has 
been kissing the cook! Oh, what shall I do?" 

Mis. De Voice (speaking from experience) : "Do nothing, 
my dear! No woman can afford to lose either! 



— A boy had been brought for the sixth time before a 
magistrate on the charge of poaching. "I'm tired of seeing 
him here." the magistrate said to the father. "No more than 
1 am." replied the latter. "Then why don't you teach him 
better?" went on the magistrate. "If you show him the 
right way he won't be coming here." "I have showed him 
the right way." answered the other; "but the fool's got 
no brains. He always gets caught." 

* $ ♦ 

--Professor — "What is ordinarily used as a conductor ot 
electricity?" Senior— "Why, er-r— " "Professor— "Correct. 
Now tell" me uh.V is the unit of electric power " Senior— 
"The what, sir?" Professor- "That will do; very good." 

* * * 

—Teacher -How is it that you're SO late. Tommy? Tom- 
my — Cause there was a man pinched for steahn' hens 
and setting a house on tire, an' knockin' down five police- 
men, an' mither sent me roon to see i: it was father. 

* * * 

—A husband, having offended his wife, came home on 
the evening of the quarrel with a parcel under his arm. 
"Darling," he said to his wife, "look here. I've got some- 
thing here for the person 1 love best in all the world." She 
came forward with a shrug of her shoulders. "Humph! 
What is it?" she asked. "A box of cigars." he replied. 



— The Sunday School teacher had been telling a story 
of spring, and the miracle of the growth of the Easter lily. 
"Now, children." she said, "who can tell me what it is that 
makes the lib' spring from this little bulb?" 

"God does it," said one little boy. Frantically our Bobby 
raised his hand, and shouted at the top of his lungs, "Fer- 
tilizer helps !" 

* * * 

The instructor in a medical college exhibited a dia- 
gram. "This subject limps." he explained, "because one 
leg is shorter than the other." He addressed one of the 
students, "Now, Mr. Haversley, what would you do in such 
a case?" Young Mr. Haversley pondered earnestly, and re- 
plied with conviction, "I fancy, sir, that I should limp, too." 

* * * 

— "The difference between a woman and a glass," said 
the funny fellow, "is that the glass reflects without speak- 
ing, while a woman speaks without reflecting." 

"And the difference between you and a glass." said the 
sharp girl, "is that the glass is polished." 

* * * 

— "So you were defeated at the polls." "Yes. I was the 
candidate of the better element in our town. The next time 
1 run for office I think I shall try to be the representative of 
the crowd that gets out to vote." 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 26, 1924 



"The Heart 
of California" 



Beautiful San Joaquin, 
with its flowers, fruits 
and delightful scenery, 
is one of the attractive 
pages in next Sunday's 
rotagravure section that 
you will wish to see; 
neither will you wish to 
miss the C o r i n t hian 
Yacht Clubbers who are 
pictured 



"In Paradise 
Cove" 



All of the Presidential 
candidates have "Their 
Hats in the Ring:" there 
is a very interesting 
page, "World Figures 
at Play"; "Here and 
There" shows celebrities 
in various walks of life: 
"Royalty and Fashion" 
vie for interest with 
"Shrines of Pleasure," 
and "America's Venus" 
graces the first page in 
charming poses. Don't 
miss the 



Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 




THE BEST 
EVIDENCE 
IN THE WORLD 



PRICE 

PUMP 



The best evidence that the 
PRICE PUMP will meet your 
particular needs is the fact that 
it has been meeting the needs 
of thousands of other farm 
owners for nearly a half cen- 
tury. This fact alone should 
be sufficient reason for you to 
get complete information about 
the PRICE PUMP. 

Write For Catalog 
G. W. PRICE 
PUMP & ENGINE CO. 

Manufacturers 
Members Western Irrigation Equip- 
ment. Assn. 
1350 Folsora St. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



-nr< 




The Yellow Diamond Road Sign 

Constantly on duty, day and night, 
Sundays and holidays, in sunshine and 
storm, 365 days in the year, the 42,000 
yellow diamond road signs of the Cali- 
fornia State Automobile Association 
are guiding hundreds of motorists each 
year over the highways and byways of 
Northern and Central California. 

On paved highway and country road, 
on city street and mountain pass, mark- 
ing mileage and direction, advising of 
traffic regulations and warning signs 
of danger, they are the motorist's con- 
stant guide and protector, making 
travel safe, sure and economical, both 
as to time and expense. No other state 
has anything to compare with them. 



— In Marylebone County Court : 
"What objection have you to your 
mother-in-law?" Husband: "When my 
wife and I are talking she listens-in." 
* + 



Embargoes Lifted 
With the removal of all restrictions 
by the various states on account of 
the hoof and mouth disease there are 
now no restrictions against the most 
pleasurable tourist travel by automo- 
bile. The last restrictions at the Cali- 
fornia-Nevada line were removed on 
the first day of this month. The Lin- 
coln Highway between Salt Lake City 
and San Francisco may now be nego- 
tiated in comfort and with reasonable 
speed. The paved and the dirt roads 
are in very good condition. 



Closed Mufflers 
The State Automobile Association 
points to the fact that open mufflers 
are a source of great annoyance to the 
persons who are this season seeking re- 
laxation in the state at large. And 
beside the nuisance through noise 
there is always a danger present that 
an open muffler may start a fire along 
a mad side through hot carbon sparks 
being dropped. 



— "Willie," asked the teacher of the 
new pupil, "do you know your alpha- 
bet?" "Yes, miss," answered Willie. 
"\\ ell, then," continued the teacher, 
"what letter comes after A?" "All the 
rest of them," was the triumphant re- 
ply. 

— "I don't quite trust you, Jimmy! 
If I married you, I believe you'd lead 
a double life." "Sure! I'm tired of a 
single one." — London Mail. 



— "Which is the biggest diamond in 
the world ?" asked the teacher. "The 
ace," replied the smart boy. 



Auto Trunks 

AUTOMOBILE TRUNKS AND 

TRUNK RACKS 

W. B. Malm & Co. 

2010 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 




-the bettor it gets- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1,800,000 cups were served at the Pan- 



Reduce High 
Blood Pressure 

High blood pressure is a sign that your sys- 
tem is full of poisons or "toxins," as the doc- 
tors call them. In most cases these poisons are 
absorbed into the blood stream from the bowels, 
where they are created by the fermentation or 
decay of impure matter. When taken up by the 
circulation they have the effect of a powerful 
stimulant upon the heart, increasing the action 
Of that organ and thus causing excessive blood 
pressure. 

To reduce your blood pressure you must rid 
your system of the poisons responsible for the 
trouble. This may be done by taking Plantlax, 
the great internal cleanser and blood purifier, 
Plantlax is a pure herbal remedy that acts in 
a mild, natural way. It keeps the liver and 
bowels in good condition. You will feel better 
after the very first dose. Go today and obtain 
a $1 bottle from any good druggist or Nature's 
Herb Co.. 1 1 1 G Market St.. San Francisco. — Ad- 
vertisement. 



t" 



1140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin S6S5 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining: to Automobile* 
Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Black* ml thin* 

H. W. Culver M. Daberer E. Johnson 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell anil Liirkiii Streets 
Phone Franklin 9 

Xo visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 
Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) . 75c 

Dinner, Week Days 81.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. $1.75 






1. 



►pen Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Posl street. Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try ' ".ii Speeial Sunday Dinners, $1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 

FN 1 1 and Game a Specialty 



Louis Cerles, Jean Barrere, 
John Piegth, Props. 



•Dfaui ^tjanitt drill 

Formerly Bergez-Frank's Old Poodle 
Dog, Bush St. 

French Tahle-D'Hote Dinner Served 
Sundays & Holidays, $1.25 

35 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel. Phone Sutter 8068 






Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 116. San Bruno. Cal. 



*■- 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Hates, 35c per (lay; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Every Woman 



Should 



Look Her Best 

Keep her hail' trimmed, shingled 
or hohhed. 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 



815 Clement St. ( 



San Francisco. 



360 Geary St. ( 

2331 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley 

Established 28 Years. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 






W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

litis CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
'hone Kearny 3!>1 San Francisco 



GANTNER & MAISON 

Funeral Directors 
Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 

Bet. ISth and 19th Sts. 
Telephone Market 64 San Francisco 



..— .+ 



Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once 
or twice a day is taking very good care 
of them. Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your 
teeth which only a competent dentist can 
take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. 
A toothache means trouble; do not wait 
for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy 
teeth faster than decay. Are your teeth 
sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAX FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 335 
Kl'Kf'IALIKTS — Extractions; Crowns; 
Self Cleaning Bridges ; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



Suits Pressed by Hand. Only — 
Suits Called for «nd Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



531 Post Street 
In Virginia Hotel 



San Franoisro 
Phone Franklin 2510 j 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil. or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1650 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418-Phones-Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
KENT SERVES CIS 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 




MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

sulpho; 

COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON ' 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Garfield 30£6 Palmer Graduate 

Hours 10 to 1 and 2 to 6 

DR. W. N. CLAYTON 

Chiropractor 

Western States Life Building 
995 Market Street San Francisco 




The Keo Sedan signifi- 
cantly expresses Reo 
value. It truly em- 
bodies the maximum 
of usable quality with 
a price that can be 
generally afforded. 

It is powered with the 
famous Reo 50 h.p. six 
cylinder engine, and 
mounted on the Reo 
double-framed chassis. 
Both features are 
striking examples of 
mecha nical correct- 
ness. 

The price is $1985 (at 
Lansing, plus tax), in- 
cluding four genuine 
full -size balloon tires, 
and steel disc wheels. 



The manufacturing of fine motor cars is relatively easy when 
the element of cost is not a factor. 

Building down to a price basis is even easier, when car quality 
is insufficiently considered. 

It is the coupling of intrinsic goodness and price moderation 
that represents a real achievement as viewed by the car buy- 
ing public. 

Reo leadership is founded upon the attainment of such a com- 
bination. For twenty years it has inspired Reo's activities. 

Higher prices than Reo's cannot buy higher values; and, cer- 
tainly, lower prices cannot buy as much car. 



Reo Motor Car Company of California, Incorporated 

Phone Prospect 682 

Van Xess Avenue at Geary Street 

OAKLAND BRANCH — 306S BROADWAY 

BRANCHES — LOS ANGELES, STOCKTON, SACRAMENTO. PHOENIX 



REO MOTOR CAR COMPANY, LANSING, MICHIGAN 



ESTABLISHED .11 LY SO, 18SO 







PRICE 10 CENTS ~ $5.00 PER YEAR 

California Advertiser 




X!X| 








RAFT AND A PUP: Antisthenes explains why the City 
Hall, once given the name of the Hall of Graft, has so much 
trouble in shaking off this opprobrium. 



gJTOP AUTO RACING! When a sport has reached a point 
where injury or death are its probable concomitants, then 
it is not fit for civilized men and women. 



jUNICIPAL CAMPS: They serve an admirable purpose, 
with next to no chance of dishonesty pertaining to their ad- 
ministration. 

HE ROMANCE OF CALIFORNIA INDUSTRIES: by Regi- 
nald Berkeley; Mr. Berkeley is relating the whole history 
of California, from its inception as a factor in the industrial 
world. 

HEAT AND CHAFF: by Nathaniel Anderson; there is a 
fearlessness in this page's philosophies that one seldom comes 
across in these davs of subsidized publications. 



SOCIETY 



PLEASURE'S WAND 
LIBRARY TABLE 



FINANCIAL 



litK 1 

xx 

IX 
xx 

sw 

6 x: 
!a )t 

X « 

x :: 

S« 
S " 
xx 

■II ■: 

3 x 

»» 

M.'X 
XX 

x,x 

x 1 ? 
- >: 

xixl 
x ~ 

X'XI 
::>■• 

^ 
x'x 
xx 

six- 
Six 

Six 
xX 
x x 
xx 

xx 
x x 



x x 

§ x 
x x 
x x 

fix 
xx 

X" 

x x 
x x 



~ X 
x x 



xx 

■ 



w 






LM 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidation s with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

Assets $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 446,024.41 

MISSION BRANCH Mission nnd 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haipht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4*4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Investment Service Awaits Your Call 

Our list contains the choice of Eastern and Western bond offerings, state, 
municipal, school, irrigation and industrial securities. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the issuance, purchase, and handling of 
investment securities. 

Let us solve your investment problems. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

817-1S California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 

Two Wall 

street 



Compensation 

General 

Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 



Travelers Checks 

for those contemplating CANADIAN TOURS 



may be purchase J at 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 



450 California Street 
Telephone Douglas 2783 



(Over 600 branches in Canada ) 



Ilie Name PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, wheth- 
er It be typewrit- 
er paper or man- 
uscript cover 
means complete 
satisfaction. 
There is a grade 
for every need. 
Ask your printer 




show you 



1 atlo s n a e m pies°i^^^s^^ar 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Kstabllshed 1866 
41 first Street - - San Francisco 



San Francisco Plating Works 

1340-51 Mission St., bet. 9th and 10th 

E. G. Denniston, Prop. 

Phone Market 2915 

We plate every description of metal 
work and goods with Gold, Silver, 
Nickel, Brass. Copper and Bronze in 
an elegant and durable manner. 

We call for jind deliver work 

Automobile and Household Goods a 
Specialty 



THE BEST 
EVIDENCE 
IN THE \Y(>HLI> 




PRICE 
PUMP 

The best evidence that the 
PRICE PUMP will meet your 
particular needs is the fact that 
it lias been meeting the needs 
of thousands of other farm 
owners for nearly a half cen- 
tury. This fact alone should 
be sufficient reason for you to 
get complete information about 
the PRICE PUMP. 

Write For Catalog 

G. W. PRICE 

PUMP & ENGINE CO. 

Manufacturers 
.Members Western Irrigation Equip- 
ment. Ahhd. 
13.">0 FolBOm St. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



-IT* 

5H 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gourh 
Telephone Park 2? 1 



Myrtledale Hot Springs 

The Wander of the Pacific Coast 

in I In- Napa I alley 

Modern Hotel Geyser Heated Rooms 

Natural Mud. Steam, Sulphur Baths 

Swimming and Amusements 

R. Roy Leveira, Prop. 

Calistoga, Cal. 



EL VERANO VILLA 

Surrounded by beautiful grove of trees. 
Country Resort for families. Open all 
year. Motion pictures, dancing pavi- 
lion, bowling alley. Free bus to Min- 
eral Springs daily. Rates $14 week up. 
Capt. A. TULLETT. Prop.: Marcel. Mgr.. 
Rl Vpvano. Sonoma Co.. or Peck-Judah. 




EiUMUhcd July 20. IM6 

0] rm m^ 




(folif ornia Mmtrtxxtt* 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, AUGUST 2, 1<»24 



Vol. CV 



No. 5 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. Russ Building. 235 Montgomery Street. San Francisco, 
Calif. Telephone Douglas 6S53. Entered at San Francisco, Calif., Post 
I Iffice as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year. $6.00 : Canada, one year. $6.00. 

— Love is really a very good excuse for being silly. 

*~ * * 

— The only ones who realize what a splendid possession 

tolerance is, are the ones who possess it. 

* * * 

— Every candidate has his own problem, and La Follette's 
chief worry is to appear just rosy enough, without being 
too red. 

— Ben Franklin said, in the cold gray dawn of the 
"morning after:" "Nothing brings more pain than too much 

pleasure." 

* * * 

— Bobbed hair, we are told by scientists, will eventually 
make bearded ladies out of the fair sex. Posterity has our 
sympathy, in that case, when Mama's whiskers will be 

pulled by Baby. 

* * ^ 

— We know an old lady who rails away unceasingly at 

the "shamelessness" of the present day styles. In her time 

there were bustles, hip pads, bust forms, and hour-glass 

waists; but those were the good old days when women 

dressed modestly, — oh. yes. indeed! 
" * * * 

— Something to know anent the fragrant weed, tobacco: 
We export $200,000,000 worth a year and import $100,000,- 
000. We produce one-third of the world's crop and our 
factories turn out a billion dollars worth of the manufac- 
tured product, chiefly cigars and cigarettes. 

* * * 

—The Federal government paid $225,201,662 in pensions 

alone during the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1923. Some 
tax on Uncle Sam, or rather, on the ordinary citizen of the 
United States. And under a socialistic government this 
sum would only be a small fraction of the innumerable 
forms of taxation that would Ik- levied on us annually. 

* * * 

— No moving picture is now complete without a bedroom 
scene, the heroine in bed, in scant dishabille, and the doc- 
tor imparting some news of a \er\ delicate and interesting 
nature to the young husband. What next, we wonder? 
Possiblv the heroine in the very throes of her accouchment, 
as has been staged at various times, in the legitimate drama. 

in Paris. 

* + * 

— The parking situation in San Francisco is becoming 
more and more one of our municipal profjlems. It is laid. 
In some, upon the shoulders of certain members of the 
police force, who have their favorites, and allow their cars 

to park in location- lor long periods of lime at a -' 

in fact, for so lout;- that they have been clubbed "sleepers." 



- -( hit of 12.607 women students who have passed out of 
I Ixford University, England, only 657 have married. Which 
may go to prove that the highly educated female of the 
species is still looked upon with disfavor by the male, or 
that the better educated a woman is, the less is she in- 
clined to take on the matrimonial yoke, or that the war has 
so depleted England that there is on an average, only one 
man to every nineteen women. Or what argument have 
you ? 

* * * 

— The New York Times devotes space on its editorial 
page to ponder the interesting question as to why there 
were always native guides ready to accompany expeditions 
into dangerous and unexplored districts of the world, when 
the chances of death were so great. The payment they re- 
ceive is small ; their hours are long; they have no insurance 
against accidents, and their names never echo in the halls 

of fame. 

* * * 

— A book written by one of themselves, who has worked 
for travellers in Himalaya, Central Asia and Tibet, an- 
swers the question in part. He says that these men — the 
best of them — possess that same love of adventure which 
their employers possess, adventure that drags men and 
women into the jaws of Death — the fastnesses of the poison- 
ous jungle, the remote heights of the Alps, where one mis- 
step may mean a fall of thousands of feet, the personal con- 
tact with wild tribes of beings, who still crave the taste 
of human flesh 1 Just the ancient allure of Death in its many 
forms ! 

* * * 

— The Christian Century, of Chicago, has announced it- 
self as against "Mobilization Day" which General Persh- 
ing has ordered for September 12th. It says in part: "Into 
the face of a mighty movement of American Churches 
against the whole war system, the government, with ap- 
parent deliberation, has cast the challenge of an announced 

Mobilization Day and seems to he forcing the issue to 

discover the extent to which the churches are prepared to 
back up their recent brave words of peace. The retire- 
ment of General Pershing, for whom all Americans have 
high respect, will thus become, not a day when the country 
can unite in suitable expression of that respect, but a day 
when a portion of the country will be forced to choose be- 
tween Christ and Mars " 

* * * 

— "While the decrease in the number of serious 
fires during the past ten days is very gratifying, it must 
not be taken by the public as an indication that all is well." 
states District Forester Redington; "the situation is .-till 
very acute, and fire conditions are becoming more -crious 
day by day, due to the continued hot weather and drying 
winds! There are still two months ahead of us during 
which time every state and Federal organization and citi- 
zen must put forth their best effort- to prevent another 

outbreak Eternal vigilance is the crux of the whole 

problem." 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 2. 1924 




ish taste. It is a degradation to the rest of us that such 
exhibitions should continue, and ordinary humanity com- 
pels us to enter our protest and demand they be stopped. 



As a matter of fact, nobody really 
Is It Clearing Up? seems to know how the situation ac- 
tually is in Europe at the present time. 
There is no doubt that we are rapidly approaching the time 
when all the subterfuges will have to be abandoned and 
the actual facts of the case appear. Then we shall know 
whether we are to have peace or war. It is true that Mac- 
Donald and Herriot seem to be getting along better than 
did Lloyd George and Poincare. But it is not a matter of 
two premiers getting along, the question is how far na- 
tional hatreds can be laid aside so as to permit of a sen- 
sible solution. The bankers with their material common- 
sense have really called the matter up. Will France get 
out of the Ruhr? It is a hard question to put to a French 
statesman, for it means that the French are to give up the 
only tangible possession which they have for all their suf- 
fering. They have had very little money. The Germans 
occupied parts of France after the war of 1870 until their 
indemnity was paid. Now. the French are to be told to 
move out. without their reparations. It is hard. But it 
is the only way in which there can be any German re- 
habilitation and if there is no German rehabilitation, Eu- 
rope will still remain desolate without any field for trade 
and the world will languish. Besides, the French have to 
get accustomed to the idea that the reparations which they 
have calculated upon will come only in small installments 
and not by any means in their entirety. And that again 
will strike a deadly blow at French commercial and finan- 
cial life, which has always depended in the long run upon 
the payment of the reparations. All this is not reckoning 
upon German action in the matter which may easily throw 
the whole business of the Dawes plan into the discard. 
In the meantime there is great uneasiness and the fact that 
Poland and Roumania are piling up armaments greatly in 
excess of their actual needs, adds considerably to the un- 
certainty of the situation. 



The disaster at San Jose on Sunday when 
Stop Reckless Allen Mulford, who was one of the racers, 
Auto Racing met his death, calls afresh the attention of 

the public to this most dangerous style of 
sport. In fact the danger attending auto races has reached 
such a point as to practically make the sport degenerate 
and attendance at it rather of the nature of prize-fighting 
or bull-lighting attendance. When a sport has reached a 
point where injury or death are its probable concomitants, 
that sport has entered upon the decadent stage and is not 
fit for civilized men and women. Those who promote such 
sports are pandering to the lowest appetites, like prize- 
fight promoters; and it becomes the solemn duty of good 
citizens to protest. Of course, it will be said that such tests 
are necessary for the development of the automobile. No- 
body objects to tests for automobiles, made tinder proper 
conditions, but auto races in public are just a gamble with 
death and the public goes, with its usual recklessness and 
thoughtlessness, to enjoy that gamble for nothing else. 
Sport! Where i> the sport? Read this — "Apparently some- 
thing snapped in the steering gear." That crowd went to 
watch a man risk his life on a gamble between a piece of 
mechanism and the chances of going at seventy miles an 
hour. "Mulford miraculously escaped burning to death." 
It is a nice civilized way of passing Sunday afternoon, is it 
not, to pay money to watch a man of courage and skill 
match himself against flaws in mechanism, with the chance 
of being burned to death? If people want to >ee that sort 
of thing thev should not be allowed to gratify their ghoul- 



If twenty-five years ago anybody had 
Municipal Camps suggested that municipalities should go 

in for the construction and maintenance 
of camps in the mountains, he would have been regarded 
as a foolish dreamer and probably well snubbed to boot. 
Now, however, it is being done and very well and suc- 
cessfully. Oakland, for example, took up the matter of 
cheap vacations for its citizens, and established camps. Now 
it is branching out still further and founding camps sub- 
sidiary to, and as feeders for, its main camps. There are 
several reasons for making these smaller camps. One, of 
course, is that smaller camps can be made in localities 
which appeal to certain classes of holiday makers and will 
consequently not be so populous as others which make 
a frankly pleasure appeal. Thus there is a new camp at 
the foot of Mt. Lassen for the use and service of mountain 
climbers. Then, as has been pointed out, the larger camps 
arc often not at all to the taste of certain important classes 
of campers, who desire to be reasonably provided for. but 
who wish in the country to escape the gregariousness of 
the city. They may have a radio at home, but under the 
stars they want no radio. They may dance at the hotels in 
the city, but in the country they want peace, and to hear 
the river run through the early night far away from the 
profanation of jazz. So, the smaller camps serve an admir- 
able purpose and Oakland makes them, mostly out of the 
profits of the larger ones. The city is very well satisfied 
with its venture into the field of providing amusement and 
recreation. It is an admirable field. It intrudes on no 
one. There is next to no chance of graft. It is not build- 
ing up a political bureau under the pretense of serving hu- 
manitv. We do criticize municipal business enterprises at 
times, but we have no complaint to make when a city hon- 
estly and perseveringly seeks the recreation of its people. 



Ever since the great war the na- 
Building Up New Markets tions which depend upon their 

trade for their life have been 
looking eagerlv for new markets. The present development 
of industry, with its mass-production, causes vast amounts 
of goods to be manufactured with great rapidity. These 
goods are in excess of the markets in the home lands ami 
must find export. This necessity for export is the main 
cause of the worry in Britain, wdiere unemployment has 
been rife since the war. It is also a necessity for ourselves 
and equally so for Japan. The clearing up of the European 
confusion and the rehabilitation of Germany as an indus- 
trial nation will also add that country as a violent corns 
petitor for markets, which are very limited in their effec- 
tive demand, for, it must be remembered, a foreign market 
needs not only a population, but it must be a population 
which has developed needs that can only be satisfied by 
industrial products. Curiously enough, the immigration 
policy of the United States, with its debarment of large 
numbers of immigrants, is likely to effect this result of 
making new markets. The tide of immigration is turning 
to South America. The steamers for ports like Buenos 
Aires. Rio de [aneiro and 1'ernambuco, are crowded, and 
the steerage is booked for months in advance. The great 
steamship lines are seriously contemplating giving up in a 
great measure the Southampton-New York trade for South 
American trade. There is plenty of land in South America 
and an unlimited field for immigration. The result will be 
the rapid building up of those sections of the country with 
the consequent new market. Then we shall see a lovely 
competitive struggle for that market, between Britain, Gerv 
many and ourselves. If the position of labor declines in 
Germany, as seems more than likely, that country will have 
the advantage, unless indeed we also reduce wages. 



August -'. 1924 



AND CALIF0RN1 \ ADVERTISER 



.\XXVXXNXVX\NXV*XVNX\.VV\Vv\VVXXV\VVVNVVXVVVXVVV 

Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 

WE had an article some months ago that was alive 
with the idea that citizens can rob in public offices 
without compunction, and we hinted this was because they 
could be dishonest when they did not suffer the odium of 
being told they were so. This dishonesty was applied then 
to the case of insurance officials who some years ago ap- 
parently took sick and died of mortification "at their' trials 
tor misappropriation of funds of policy holders. Their lack 
of integrity was peculiar, and it is not to be doubted that 
if there happened to be an objecting secretary or other of- 
ficial who had told the insurance presidents before the 
scandal and ensuing trials what they did was wrong, he re- 
ceived for his pains a sneering retort that he was too hon- 
est. Vet they would hardly have acknowledged themselves 
dishonest; the fellow who robs a house or jewelry store 
is dishonest, or rather, he is a robber. No purloining public 
official or corporation head will disagree with you on that 
point. It is a psychological enigma why men of this type 
cannot stand the grind of a court proceeding against them, 
except for the explanation that it is one thing to miss in 
one's conscience the viciousness of dishonesty, and another 
to have yourself laid bare by the appelation of Thief! Say 
"You're a thief," to the regular, the professional, the man 
in and out of jail all his life, and see how he takes it. No 
wonder this open sesame to his soul so effects the culpable 
living within the pale of decent society that it hurries him 
to the grave. 

When the article mentioned was written, ex-Secretarv 
Fall had fallen very sick, and one or two others in trouble, 
and this was pointed out for close attention. It is also 
strange today that Col. Charles R. Forbes, former director 
of the Veterans' Bureau "may not live long enough to face- 
trial on charges of bribery next fall." It is stated, too. he 
has lost fifty-two pounds in weight in the past few months. 
Forbes is a man who has much to answer for if he lives, 
having been indicted in Chicago for bribery, and accused 
of squandering funds set aside for sick and disabled sol- 
diers, as well as wanted for trial at Baltimore on another 
charge of conspiracy in selling $3,000,000 worth of supplies 
stored at Perryville for about twenty cents on the dollar. 

* * * 

— It is the concrete of our case, always, that is effective. 
II it is saiil that most men are bad, the easilv disputable has 
not onlj been uttered, but the weight of truth that causes 
the general statement is lost. People really don't know 
what is meant, unless they are reminded of yesterday when 
that awful thing was done by one man to another, with a 
picture description given of what it was; that now we have 
today this, as bad or worse than that of yesterday; and 
tomorrow it is predicted a most appalling outrage with 
unbelievable details will be a morsel to contemplate. 

An abstract statement is usually an exaggerated one. im- 
lorcelul in itself, and unnecessary if effect is desired. It 
may be basically true, because of the reasons that bring 
it forth, but it is loo easil) answered in kind. If you say 
" \11 men arc bad," another will answer that "The major- 
ity of men are good," the consequence of which i- the fact 
of how bad men really are. is lost in such doubt that our 
general conscience is at ease ami shame of viciousness 

nullified. 

* * * 

— We all measure to the misfortune of bad wives, meau- 

irticularly the nt, and the spendthrift. If a 

man wants a home, and bargains on it when he marries, a 

rattle-headed wife is a bane to life in the case of the mil- 



lionaire or the twenty-five-dollar-a-week clerk; yes, of the 
church-goer and the robber. 

Harry J. Dunlap, alleged hold-up man. from his inter- 
view at Detroit the other day, hit it off very badly in his 
marriage to Edith Dunlap. This fellow, if he is the "pelting 
party bandit," of the Hollywood foothills, is a vidian who 
should lie done away with quickly, lie admits he is a thief 
and denies he is a killer; whether he is more, being the 
demon of southern California, — again, if so, we hope he is 
punished with vengeful speed — he by his own account had 
an unsatisfactory home-life with his wife. She chased out 
and left him to wash the dishes after meals. He did the 
job himself. The robber complains of this bitterly, saying 
he gave the woman seventy-five cents out of every dollar 
he made. He shows his feeling mostly when he talks of 
the way his wife raises their boy, which is anything but 
the right way. We use his own words, as he talks of this 
in a choking voice: "She wouldn't even take the little fella 
to Sunday school. So I had to take him myself." 

* * * 

— Now they are beginning to say that Mussolini didn't 
mean it. He is very sorry for what his adherents did, 
among other things murdering Giacomo Mattettoi, but for 
whose remarkable bravery in opposing the violence of the 
Fascisti and the arbitrary methods of their leader, thereby 
suffering martyrdom, Italy would be half-free without hope 
today. A correspondent on one of the dailies in writing 
of it, says how thoroughly Mussolini is against the crime 
of the rule by sword, castor oil and like means. Where 
does she get that idea? He is now, ves. 

* * * 

— We do not like to sound fresh, but the picture in the 
newspaper we have just seen makes Bryan and his brother 
look like a couple of deacons. We have known some very 
nice old deacons, but they did not play the game of poli- 
tics. William J. Bryan's straight line mouth has grown 
harder. There was more good-nature in his face when he 
made the valedictory speech on graduation at an Illinois 
college, but the older he gets with his religion and puritani- 
cal views, the more unpleasant he looks. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Vun Nest* Ave., at Geary Street 



SAX FRANCISCO 



Is the most refined family hotel in the city 
— a home unsurpassed 



EUIEll M. WOODBURY Manager 



F OR SAL E 

At ATHERTON 
San Mateo County 

Residence 

Eleven Rooms 

Six Acres 

$35000 



Full Particulars 
Owner 



Room 381 



235 Montgomery 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER August 2, 1924 

The Romance of California Industries 

By Reginald F. Berkeley 



( Part 3) 

The First "Color" 

BIGLER was working at the time for James Marshall, 
on the construction of a sawmill over the south fork 
of the American river, at Culloomah — now Coloma, in pro- 
saic dress. A dam built, a ditch was in process of digging, 
to take water for turning the mill-wheel. It was Marshall's 
custom to raise the gate to let the water wash out sand 
and gravel throughout the night, shutting off the water in 
the morning. < )ne January morning, he noticed something 
glittering at the bottom of the ditch, about the size of three 
seeds of mustard. Picking it out. his first thoughts went to 
that for which men sell what they call their souls, the 
apple of Eve's destruction ; and we may believe, as he tells 
us. that his heart went on a rampage for a few minutes. 
But it was not the right color, and the simple soul let 
himself be worried until he thought of a far more useful 
metal — iron. What he had in his hand was a piece of iron 
pyrites, but he had found gold, and it was not long before 
the world learned that Midas had found relief for his pains 
b\ sowing California with the source of his troubles. 

The first effect was the depopulation of the old Spanish 
towns in Central California and the desertion of farms 
throughout the state. The news spread all too soon, and 
induced the greatest rush of peoples, from all parts of the 
world, to one spot, that history knows of. By land, by sea. 
in caravans, in anything that would keep afloat, they came; 
reckless of what it cost in cash or lives, the wildest, mad- 
dest mix-up of humanity that was ever assembled. "Thev 
came around the stormy J lorn; or by ship to Chagres, on 
the Isthmus of Panama, across the Isthmus in dugouts 
poled by natives up the Chagres River, and on muleback 
with packtrains, to Panama, whence they took ship again 
for California. They came from England and France, from 
Mexico and South America, down the west coast from 
Oregon, and across the Pacific from the Sandwich Islands 
i now Hawaii), and from China. And when the ships readied 
San Francisco Bay, not only did the passengers rush to 
the goldfields; the crews deserted, the very captains aban- 
doned their vessels and joined in the general migration." 
Unguarded, six hundred ships blocked the harbor, most of 
them rotting where they had been left. Regular occupa- 
tions were unknown for many a long day in the state's 
hives of industry — such as they were at that time. Every- 
thing was left unfinished; the carpenter dropped his tools; 
the plumber forgot the importance of making work; the 
mason threw away his trowel; the farmer left his crops 
unreaped; even the saloonkeeper found his occupation 
gone; and landladies ceased to importune their lodgers for 
back rent (unless they struck the same district in their 
scramble for gold). For all who owed money it was a 
glorious time, for there were none left to collect. 

Hardships Endured 

Of the 150.000 or more who comprised the first dash, 
many thousands did not live to know the meaning of the 
word "home." Other fevers than the gold-lust made these 
their prey; violent deaths, more than will ever be heard 
of. were the fate of as many. Few secured enough to com- 
pensate for the weeks and months of terrible hardship, of 
alternate cold and blinding heat, of wretched housing and 
worse feeding, that spelled for them broken health and 
sickened hearts. Of these few, fewer knew any real hap- 



piness as the fruits of all they had undergone, the reaction 
of city life at intervals proving too much for them. To 
this day. the demon of gambling that waits ever on sud- 
den success is with us. bane and blessing too. 

Some there were, however, a goodly sprinkling, who wise- 
ly saw that the gold hunt must be regarded as a vacation 
pastime only, and kept their eyes skinned for other prod- 
ucts of the soil; assure a firmer foundation on which to 
build up family fortunes. Of these real sons of Adam, 
more later. For there were more genuine home-seekers 
among the diggers than is generally realized, as is proved 
by the number-, who brought their entire families with 
them. Not many at first, but from 1S51 onwards these 
formed a large proportion of our settlers-to-be. Disap- 
pointed, at first, with the appearance of the country, thev 
learned by degree.- that climate is infinitely more import- 
ant to plant life than soil (90 per cent of the nutrition com- 
ing from above. 10 per cent from below). The impulse 
was to try out everything, and. coming from all parts of 
the globe, their experiments endowed California with its 
wealth in variety of agricultural development. To say noth- 
ing of the centuries of experience with which those pio- 
neers were blessed. For in handling mother earth, an ounce 
of experience outweighs a ton of book-lore. 

The earlier coiners were from the Mississippi Valley 
states, but it was not long before states further east con- 
tributed to the population around the mining districts, so 
it may be understood why our extraordinary mixture of 
races so readily grasped the traditions and ideals of our 
country. Early admission to the Union assisted a quick 
realization of the advantages of good standards of living, 
and stimulated ambitions in the direction of high attain- 
ments. All the historians agree that the legislative, edu- 
cational, and industrial undertakings of the founders of our 
stale equalled in moral purpose any since manifested. We 
made a good beginning, on sound foundations, despite all 
the probabilities to the contrary. 

(To be continued. ) 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



A Weekly Excursion into the Realm of Learning 

The advantages of 

5typ (tea K. Htlltama JnstitittP 

are now open to a limited number of San Francisco, 
Oakland and Alameda families. New dormitory system, 
carefully supervised. Pupils leave home Monday morn- 
ing and return Friday afternoon. 

From Fourth Grade. Accredited to the University of 
California. See representative at Children's Book Shop. 
474 Sutter Street, San Francisco, hours 2 to 4 p. m. 
daily. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 



Telephone Sutter 6130 



Under Management CARL, S. STANLEY 



August 2, 1924 



WD CALIF0RN1 \ ADVERTISER 




By ANTISTHENES 

Graft and a Pup 

Gl\ E a dog a name. and. even a terrier could not shake it 
off him. The mind of the average taxpayer is abso- 
lutely made up that somehow, somewhere, there are leaks 
in public treasuries; hit;' defalcations occur in banking in- 
stitutions, but, after the culprits involved are exposed or 
apprehended, suspicions cease to be directed against these 
places; forty banks may fail, still, folk will swear by the 
forty-first that failed not! Why the different contrasting 
mental attitude? 

The other clay a friend of mine — and you may label him 
spokesman for nearly the rest of the population — said to 
me: "There's graft out in the City Hall." Knowing the 
present system in vogue out in the beautiful big- white struc- 
ture, and remembering civil service, all work done by pub- 
lic contract and sundry inhibitives to one's driving in like 
a "daylighter" to cart off the public's moneys. I retorted : 
"Isn't so; so isn't it up to you to be specific?" Whereupon 
he released his obsessing thought: "John Reed. Jr., rela- 
tive of Mayor Rolph, is drawing fat fees out of the city- 
treasury for erecting municipal buildings, and isn't that 
graft?" I explained that it wasn't, but, rather, a lack of 
delicacy in appointment and something likely to subject a 
public chief executive to adverse criticism, because archi- 
tect fees are standardized, and some other — not a relative 
— would receive the same remuneration for like work. 
Knowing naught of architecture I stated I wasn't in a po- 
sition to pass on John's work and there might be edificial 
engineers better or worse than he — someone might know. 
I didn't, but we all hate to hear that ugly word "Graft" 
uttered carelessly, or as the effect of habit. Similar ap- 
pointments, as "chief deputies" to elective officers, "assist- 
ant district and city attorneys." "court stenographers" and 
so on -mainly sinecures — were allowed as sop to poli- 
ticians by the freeholders who formulated the charter and 
its civil service provisions and were exempted in order to 
insure its passage. 

My friend was enlightened but not convinced, so I told 
him how once I possessed an ordinarily well-bred bull pup; 
how an enemy of mine or of the canine called him a mon- 
grel and the name stuck with him till he breathed his last 
lungful of lethal gas out at the public pound. Years ago 
the municipal government was most gratlful; it got the 
name, and so. "it may be for years, and it may be forever," 
ere it graduates from out the opprobrious classification to 

which many citizens insist on allocating it. 
* * * 

Let's Rest the Goat 

In a recent discussion of salarv raises for 
by the Board of Supervisors, some oral 
emptied of gobs of wisdom, while a mess of indiscriminate 
criticism was likewise indulged. Let us state this: If you 
want efficient employes, you must pay for them, and ac- 
cordingly, ami advisedly, we relate, that, in the conduct of 
municipal business, generally, the ratio of errors, defalca- 
tions and other tripups to safe financial sailing, is as live 
to one in favor of municipal as against outside commercial 
institutions. We utter this boast, not through love of this 
local governmental establishment, but rather for the sake 
of being classified a- the one journal daring to nol join 
the popular hunt for the municipal goat. When the average 
newspaper has dearth of news it usually fill- up copy with 
a lambasting of local officialdom, though it seldom risks 



city empl 
cavities were 



Ig specific, as bj SO doing, it may tread on political corns 
and this might cause reaction, for: how many of the cit- 

enry know that when a new administration comes in. 
some of the choicest sinecure appointments exempt from 
civil service are bestowed on employes of local dailies, and 
tor an obvious reason? There's one in the Board of Super- 
visors, one or two in the Mayor's office and so on; maybe 
that's revelation, eh. and a reason why certain positions 
are left uncommented upon? 

So. as to the supervisorial utterance that "one employe 
of the tax office does little more than draw his monthly 
pay check"! The party alluded to is. of course, non-civil 
service, and. shorn of some exaggeration, the statement is 
not entirely untrue, but. why gaff the minnows and let 
the pet porpoises flounder through unhanded? Where the 
evil exists it is the result of this: there would be no un- 
employment were the entire works under civil service (not 
through the "blanketing" process but after subjection to 
the usual tests) or, at least, there would be the same mini- 
mum thereof as exists in every commercial institution. 

So long as men have the power to give out good jobs to 
favorites who do not have to contend for them by exami- 
nation, there will be a measure of overemployment. The 
same obtains in most non-municipal commercial enterprises 
where the sons, or the sons-in-law, or wives' cousins "race 
the pay roll and toil not neither do they spin, but.— the 
customer pays for it. We have found city employes effi- 
cient and generously courteous, so why not give the coat 
a vacation? 

* * * 

— Brigadier General Ulysses G. McArthur has been rec- 
ommended by Secretary of War Works for promotion for 
heroism at the battle of the Marne. Possible an error in 
the news; we understand how a brigadier general might be 
a genius, a politician, a good polo player or a social lion, 
but we fail to gather wherein lies his opportunity to be a 
hero! The poor fellow usually is located so far back of 
the front line trenches he's cheated of the chance to wear 
the laurel wreath — or the funereal one. 

* * * 

— Rossetta Duncan must be a courageous little person. 
She hasn't missed a performance since those fiendish Cicero 
cops — according to the press agent — broke her nose, nearly 
ditto her back, split her scalp and left her. as one friendly 
physician testified, "in the most frightful condition I have 
ever seen a human body"! And now you can't get into 
the theater where she's showing back east. 

* # * 

— The interpretation of the Labor Department that the 
100,000 Japanese presently in virtual possession of Hawaii 
are inhibited from immigrating to the mainland of the Unit- 
ed States is satisfying. ( Ine hundred thousand of these pro- 
lifics dumped upon us today means 1.000.000 tomorrow — 
so to say. 

— Was it because of bread cast upon the waters, that 
England's king, for the first time in history, gave a garden 
party in Buckingham Palace grounds recently in honor of 
Americans? Some time ago the American lawyers now in 
convention over there, refused to ride on a United States 

vessel and chartered a British ship for the trip across 

* r * 

— For those ultra-modernists without erudition who 
bombastically proclaim religion is a plaything of r-uper- 
stition designed for immature minds: says Nathan Leo- 
pold, Jr.. murderer: "I had religion drummed into me when 
my mind was unformed, but. when I began to reason, you 
bet I drummed it out" ! 

* * * 

—The newly appointed local prohibition chief promises 
to "padlock" every place where the eighteenth amendment 
is violated! Good news for the hardware men. but ill for 
over half of the city householders. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 2, 1924 



TownMLCrier 




) WHO THE DEWLftRT THOU 

"ONE THAT WILL PLAY THE 
} OEWL,SIH WITH VOW 

Shakspeare- , 



"Atta boy! Don't let them beat you up in jail." We 
saw this heading in the Chronicle, in the Safety Valve, we 
remember. He who said it had better not. It fails to be 
as funny as it sounds in the caption. Operative 13 at Eu- 
reka writes a letter which refers to the possibility of police- 
men being angels. "I will guarantee they are not," he says. 
Then he goes on to say bow he has seen "many a poor 
prisoner get beat up by several policemen when the pris- 
oner was in a cell." This operative in Eureka has some de- 
cency and feeling, and is inspired to his article by the out- 
rage on Miss Duncan in Chicago, though in that case, the 
policeman, over six feet high, over two hundred pounds in 
weight, felt quite sure he was equal to the task of best- 
ing the little comedienne with bis lists without getting her 
into a cell where other officers of the law would aid him. 
But the Chronicle man thinks it all funny. Just why? 

* # * 

— It is the same feeling, outrageously selfish in posses- 
sion or the desire of it. when a man kills the object of his 
love whether she lie his wife or sweetheart, who no longer 
reciprocates. Lovers who murder for their desire blight 
the name of the human species. They are of a kind, what- 
ever relations they hold with the objects of their affections. 
Sometime ago a man in the city killed his wife because 
she had lost her love for him, and slaughtered his children, 
too. that she bore him. Would he have done the same had 
she lost his pocket-book? That might at least involved 
carelessness, over which voluntary control could be pos- 
sible. Now. the other day a man named McKeon attempt- 
ed to murder a woman when she had never pretended to 
like him: It is hard to speak ill of the dead — for he suc- 
ceeded in suicide, but his nerve was diabolical. 

* * * 

— We hope they do not spoil Helen Wills, the young 
tennis champion from Berkeley. Most of the poses shown 
in her pictures have been natural, but a rather painful one 
appeared the other day. It was artificial. She had her head 
up in the air as though she quite knew she was some grand 
thing. Her eyes were lifted to the stars with much gran- 
deur; the body of her was set with a sort of extraordinary 
regal self-consciousness, with the laurels winners, her tennis 
rackets, pressed to her bosom. It is a safe wager that the 
photographer did it. The girl has never shown herself 
likelv to indulge in such nonsense. Why take the natural- 
ness out of Helen Wills? 

* * * 

' — The Rev. Clarence Reed, pastor of the First Unitarian 
Church. Oakland, is useful to his religion, his congregation 
ami his country, if he preaches many sermons like the one 
of his a few days ago. He took congress to task for voting 
in terms of votes. As a man. we suppose, he could not avoid 
protesting at this; but when he said "Graft and violation of 
law are the deadly enemies of American political and eco- 
nomic life." he touched upon morals, and therefore what 
is akin to religion. 

* * * 

— A couple of lion hunters came to town the other day. 
They have been through the tropics, it is said, destroying 
the beasts for adventure and the honor of being big sports- 
men. They are man and wife. For our part we would 
rather see them making a home where they came from, 
than sneaking with murderous intention into the animal 
kingdom. 



— If we attempted to keep pace with the record of the 
cases where one child shoots another with a fire arm. about 
one a week in San Francisco and vicinity would be our 
score. Eight-year-old Theodore Chartier, from the habit of 
playing with his air rifle, made no distinction of the dan- 
ger lurking in a twenty-two calibre gun, which was stand- 
ing at hand in a closet corner. Small as this weapon is. with 
it he killed little six-year-old Leon Vieux. We again beg 
people to note the wisdom of keeping guns away from 
children as they would the plague. We do not like to read 
of these disasters. 

— General Bingham in New York some ten years ago 
tried to regulate the police with a sort of military system 
in New York, and didn't finish for some reason. They 
said he "couldn't get away with it." General Smedley D. 
Butler is having much the same kind of time in Phila- 
delphia, lie has sounded to us a little flamboyant and ram- 
bunctious, which was not the way with Bingham. Aside 
from this tentative criticism, we would be sorry to see the 
Mayor of Philadelphia weakly back down in upholding 
General Butler in any honest effort of the latter to do the 
right thing with the vice situation in that city. 
* * * 

— Major Robert Imbrie, late American vice-consul at 
Teheran, who was murdered by a Persian mob some time 
ago. if he tried in the fool-hardy manner, as first described 
in the despatches, to take pictures of a religious ceremony 
of the Persian people, pushing his way through the crowd 
in approved American "go-getter" style, has left a hard 
case for bis own government. It requires keen diplomacy, 
indeed, to secure the proper apologies, and perhaps retri- 
bution, under the circumstances. 



Notions From New Novels 

I love to see a person go enthusiastically at a thing. 
whether it's a job of work, or a game of golf, or a war. or 
a pillow fight — anything. I hate what 1 call the "droopy" 
attitude. — "The Burden," by Jeffery E. Jeffery. 

Whether he wants to enter or no, a man with a strong 
sense of possession expects all the chambers of his wife's 
heart to be his. He alone must own the key — to use it or 
allow it to rust, as he pleases — "Enticement," by Clive Ar- 
den. 

"There's nothing in life like loving someone. People 
don't talk to you about it. and lots of people don't know 
what they are missing. It's all the difference between be- 
ing nothing or something. It's all the difference between 
being dead or alive. When you are really loving someone 
you're all right, and nothing can harm you. And when you 
aren't, nothing is right, everything is wrong." — "The 
Dream," by H. G. Wells. 

Any girl with a pretty face can get a man if she wants 
him. but she wants a brain inside it if she's going to keep 
him.— "Card Castle," by Alec Waugh. 

Happiness lies in doing the thing we like, and doing it 
well. 

A woman hates making up her mind. In her heart of 
hearts she prefers to have it done for her. — "Three Rooms," 
by Warwick Dooping. 



— Before being permitted to drive an automobile a man 
should be compelled to pass an intelligence test that would 
prove him capable at least, of telling which is the right 
side of the road. — Toledo Blade. 



— J. Harper Sharp, Federal agent, 
thousand unlawful liquor dealers in I 
exclusive of prohibition officers. 



■-ays there are 
s Angeles. Thi 



ten 
s is 



August _'. 1924 



VND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




WVeyou 

HEtfRD IT? 



— "Have ye got any food vvi' ye, Dougal?" asked Angus. 
" We a bottle of whisky. What hae you, Aneus?" 
" I (ried tongue." 

"Guid! Then we'll halves wi nor proveesions." 
The whisky was duly divided and drunk. Angus wiped 
his lips. 
"Noo for your dried tongue," said Dougal. 
"Mon," said Angus, "it's no dry the noo!" 

* * * 

— Some of the inmates of the jail were lathing a room, 
and the governor was inspecting the progress of the work. 

After watching the men for a few minutes, the governor 
said to one of the convicts. "Look here, my man, you are 
putting those laths too close together. That sort of work 
will never do." 

The prisoner laid down his tools, and said, "Well, sir, 
1 am willing to be turned off if my work don't suit you. 
I didn't apply for this job, and if you are dissatisfied — well, 
you can sack me." 

* * * 

— The canny Scot was not quite sure whether business 
might not keep him away from his evening meal. 

"Jeanie, ma girl." said he to his wife, ere he left home 
in the morning, "if I'm no able to be hame I'll ring ve up 
at six precisely. Dinna tak' the receiver off, and then 
I'll no hae to pit in ma twopence." 

— Murphy, a new cavalry recruit, was given one of the 
worst horses in the troop. 

"Remember," said the instructor, "no one is allowed to 
dismount without orders." 

Murphy was no sooner in the saddle than the horse 
bucked and Murphy went over his head. "Murphy," yelled 
the instructor, "you dismounted!" 

"I did." "Did you have orders?" "I did." "From head- 
quarters?" "No; from hindquarters." 

* * * 

— A clergyman was questioning a Sunday-school class 
and turned to the subject of baptism. 

"Now, children, can anyone tell me what are the neces- 
sary things for baptism?" 

Naturally he received the reply, "Water." 

"Oh. yes. that is one, but can any of you think of the 
other?" 

After a long silence a small girl held up her hand. "Well, 
my dear, what is the other necessary tiling?" "Please, sir 
— a liali\ !" 

* * * 

— A captain of industrj was addressing the student- ol 
a college: "All my success in life." he said proudly, "all 
m\ enormous financial prestige. 1 owe to one thing only — 
pluck. 1 want all you young men to take that word for 
your motto." 

He paused impressively, and a -mall student seated in 
the front row asked: "Yes sir. but won't you please tell 
us how main and whom did you pluck'" 

* * * 

— Some people had engaged a maid, and when she arrived 
they found she was not only disagreeable, but useless. 

"Well," -aid the lady oi the house to her husband, "may- 
be -lie won't stay long — she didn't bring a trunk." 

"Don't i>e too sure, ma," chipped in their eldest son. aged 
five. "Just look at baby— he didn't bring anything— but 
he's -till here." 



■ \ young man from the country, walking along a cit\ 
It, Stopped in front of the live station and looked in. 

'D'ye have many fires in town?" he asked. 

"Yes. we have them pretty often," replied the fireman. 

"Ever try to see how quick you can get out?" "( Mi. yes!" 

At that moment an alarm was sounded. At the lir-t stroke 
ol the gong the men rushed to their posts, the doors of 
the station opened, and within a few seconds men and en- 
gines were speeding down the street. 

The young man watched the proceedings with admira- 
tion. "Well," he exclaimed, "there ain't many places where 
they'd go to all that trouble to show a stranger what they 
can do!" 

* * * 

— The doctor rushed out of his study in a state of great 
excitement. "Get my bag at once!" he shouted. 

"Why. what is the matter?" inquired his wife, a timid 
little woman, who was more or less used to this sort of 
thing. 

"Some fellow has just telephoned that he can't live with- 
out me." gasped the medical man as he reached foT+iis hat. 

His wife gave a sigh of relief. "Just a moment," she 

said, gently. "I think that call was for our daughter, dear." 

* * * 

— It was the day of the school concert, and the audience 
consisted mainly of mothers, proud or envious, according 
to the parts that their children were playing. 

One small boy came onto the platform. Striking a bold 
attitude, he began: "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend 
me your ears !" 

\\ hereupon one of the mothers turned to her compan- 
ion. "There, that's the Joneses' boy," she said, tartly. "He 
would't be his mother's son if he weren't trying" to borrow 
something." 

— "Mr. Chairman," said the speaker, "I have been on my 
feet for nearly ten minutes, but there is so much ribaldry 
and so many interruptions that I can scarcely hear myself 
speaking." 

"Cheer up, guv'nor," said a voice; "you ain't missin' 

much 

* * * 

— 'Aon told me mama was going to Paris to get a little 



babie. didn't you?" "Yes, dearie.' 



Then why did she brim. 



back twins?" 
dearie." 



"Because the franc had sunk to half its value. 



papa 



for mv hand I' 



— She: "While you are asking 
something lively on the piano." 

He: "I'd rather you didn't, dearest. You know some peo- 
ple can't keep their feet still when they bear lively music' 



The Municipal Railway 

The Municipal Railway is a start on the acquirement and 
maintenance of a perfect system for San Francisco. But 
this perfect system must remain a dream until such time 
as the supervisors complete the steps to take over the com- 
peting lines of the Market Street Railways. 

The Market Street Railways have a much more complete 
and consistent system than that owned by the municipal- 
ity, but they are deterred from making many needed exten- 
sion- through the fact that the action, so long awaited by 
the people, may take place at any time of uniting both 
-\ stems. 

We all know that a system, such as that owned by the 
city, is a very difficult thing to make pay its way. and we 
also know that if the wish of the people were carried out. 
the merged system would pay. if placed under the proper 
management That is why it is urged by all that the su- 
pervisors take immediate action to carry out what they 
decided long ago they would do. Why the long delay in 
making practical the union of the two line- of street rail- 
ways? 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 2, 1924 






^hnanoal; 

By P. N. Beringer 

THE revolution staged by the people at Sao Paolo in 
Brazil is having the effect predicted in this column two 
weeks ago. It is shown in a raise in the price of coffee, 
and this rise is bound to become greater as time wears 
on. No help may be expected from coffees from other 
sources than Brazil, and Brazil itself is in no position to 
help us from the coffee usually stored by the government 
in carrying out its valorization of coffee. I am told there 
is no Guatemala coffee available, and we have come to 
depend so largely on the Brazilian article that other coffees 
have found markets in other countries, to a very large ex- 
tent. Porto Rico produces a coffee which is said by some 
to be superior to the Brazilian article, hut the entire crop 
of Porto Rico is usually sold far in advance in France. 
Coffee consumption in this country has increased so fast 
that it has consumed not only the regular crop cord- 
ing here from Brazil, but all Brazilian coffee held in order 
to stabilize the price of coffee, has been consumed, too. 

The Water Question 

The Contra Costa people have made the preliminary mo\ e 
to join their cities with the Municipal Utilities District of 
Oakland. It has been known for a long time that Contra 
Costa would have to do something of this kind or go into 
the water business itself. It is now decided that it is bet- 
ter to work in harmony with Oakland in solving this verv 
trying question. Oakland has had under consideration the 
obtaining of water from many sources, notable among 
which is the McCloud river and the Eel River. 

* * * 

As a Filming Center 

The genial Will Hays flitted in and out of San Francisco 
while here on a visit to inspect some of the studios that 
are engaged in producing films. While here, he found time 
enough to say that San Francisco and vicinity had the cli- 
mate and the scenery necessary to make it a wonderful 
moving picture center. En passant, he said that he was 
entirely out of politics, and that he could not discus.-- the 
morals of the movie people. But while here, he gave the 
impression that he thought the movie producers no worse 
and no better than other people in other businesses, and 
he stressed the fact that they tried in every way to uphold 
the respectability of the shows they produced. 

* * * 

The Business Tendencies 

Talks with bankers this week emphasize the fact that 
the business tendencies are upward. This is the report 
coming from nearly every metropolitan center. The whole- 
sale trade reports a slight advance in prices with business 
better than fair. The banks are all of them prosperous and 
the retailer wears the smile that will not come off. Col- 
lections have been improving right along and everybody 

should be happy. 

$ $ # 

Import and Export 

The business through this port with foreign countries 
is increasing to such an extent as to be almost phenomenal. 
This increase does not refer to one or two commodities 
which sometimes so materially affect the reports of busi- 
ness done by some of the ports of the country. As, for 
instance, in the case of Los Angeles, where oil exporta- 
tion cut such a very large figure and where the impor- 



tation or passage of lumber over its wharves in such vast 
quantities help swell figures to such an astounding size. 

* * * 

France Would Hang Thieves 

There is a movement on foot in France which would 
apply the capital punishment to those who steal. It is be- 
ing discussed not only in France, but in all quarters where 
an understanding of the proposition has been placed be- 
fore the people by the newspapers. It is certainly a novel 
suggestion, but it is not an impractical one, and if stealing- 
has graduations, which is quite likely, then it should be 
]Hissible to so arrange that the theft through actual want, 
the theft through imbecility, or thieving brought on by cir- 
cumstances over which the thief has but slight or no con- 
trol, might then call for a modified form of punishment 
by imprisonment. But to guillotine or hang all thieves 
regardless of the reasons why the thieving was clone, or 
the responsibility of society in the making of the thief, 

would, it seems to me, be absolutely idiotic. 

* * * 

Industrial Association 

The Industrial Association of San Francisco has just 
issued a special bulletin in which is detailed at some length 
the work accomplished by that association. The work is 
all practical and constructive, and the people of San Fran- 
cisco are to be congratulated on the benefits derived from 

such a progressive and aggressive organization. 

* * * 

The Forest Fires 

Nearly all of the forest fires have been conquered at this 
writing. Today there is but one serious lire in active op- 
eration. This fire is in the north, and strange as it may 
seem, is in an area which has been held closed to all uses 
by the United States Forest Service. It is expected it will 
soon be brought to an end through the use of troops. The 
area of fireswept portions of the State figures very large: 
237,000 acres have been burned over since the month of 

January. Nearlv every fire was avoidable. 

* * * 

Assessment Plagues 

The various and all too plentiful mining companies that 
assess their stockholders without adequate cause, should 
be put out of business by the cancellation of their permits 
to do business in this state, or any other state. This should 



OFFICES 



The Holbrook Building 



58 SUTTER STREET 

A Strictly First-Class Office Building 

Agent Room 411 



Municipal and Public Utility BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

Mills Building, San Francisco 
Fhone — Douglas 2244 



"The Largest Fire Insurance 
Company in America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM. 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 
LIBERAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



August 2, 1924 



le .'i the duties of the corporation commissioner. When- 
ever a mining company, doing business in this state in the 
matter of selling stock to state residents, has placed an 
assessment on its stockholders it should be forced, pre- 
vious to making this assessment, to file a proof of the fact 
that the assessment is made necessarj by actual expendi- 
tures made in the mining operations, or for money to spend 
in mining operations in the immediate future. There is en- 
tireK too much complaining to he heard about assessments, 
levied where apparently no work has been dune to war 
rant the assessment. This is a crying- evil and it may easily 
he remedied. Of course, a stockholder may appeal to the 
courts in such matters and he may force the officers of a 
corporation to produce their books and proofs of what has 
been done hut that is a slow and expensive process and 
the claim is made that the office of the corporation com- 
missioner should attend to all such matters. 

* * * 

Insurance 

Twenty-two insurance companies were licensed to do 
business in California during the first six months of 1924. 
This is in keeping with the general increase in business 
in every direction, and is due to the fact that general pros- 
perity prevails and that there has been a large increase in 
population in all parts of the state. 

The insurance fraternity of this city is feeling sympathetic 
with Insurance Commissioner George D. Squires on his 
recovery from the effects of the automobile accident, which 
incapacitated him for so long a time. He is now capable 
of coming to business every day. 

* # # 

Renewals of Licenses 

The applications for renewals of licenses, to do business 
as insurance agents, have poured into the commissioner's 
office at a great rate, sometimes running as high as twenty- 
five hundred a day. It has been necessary to keep twenty 
extra stenographers busy in order to meet and dispose of 
this avalanche properly. Last year it is said that 70.000 
licenses were issued. 



\\"l) (' \l.lli IRN1 \D\ ERTISER 

Comments on Foreign Affairs 



u 



— "Isn't it rather difficult to officiate at a double wed- 
ding?" asked a friend of the clergyman. 

"Not at all," replied the parson. "After all it's only just 
putting two and two together." 



— To the devil his due: the Ku Klux Klan is accused of 
having fomented Jap exclusion. 



VACATION TIME 

IS 

FLASHLIGHT TIME 

Renew your batteries and bulbs before going away 

HETTY BROS. 

Headquarters For 

FLASHLIGHTS— BATTERIES— BULBS 

Free Flashlight Battery with every $3.00 sale or over 

during months of June and July. 



Cars Washed and Polished 

While You Wait, ,\V-r Pncess. Can Called For .in./ Delivered 

Without Additional Charge 

Simonlling U Flushing Top Dressing 

Super Glossing Greasing Crank Case Flushing 

Alemite Service 

Phone Qraystone !>70 
14SO Hush -Street 



PALACE AUTO LAUNDRY 



John Eversman. Manager 



Till', city oi Sao Paolo, Brazil, is in the public eye, bul 
what the public sees or understands does not amount 
to much, as very little seems to he known of Brazil in gen- 
eral and of Sao Paolo in particular. Which reminds me of 
ni incident which took place at a lecture given in Rumsen 
Hall at New York at one time during the war. This par- 
ticular lecture was one of a course on Latin America and 
dealt exclusively with Brazil and the Brazilians. The au- 
dience was composed mostly of employees and employers 
engaged in the import and export trade. 

The lecturer was a gifted man and held his audience 
keenly interested. His talk was interspersed with moving 
pictures and it may truthfully be said that the majority of 
his hearers, for the first time in their lives, were able to 
picture the vastness of Brazil and the tremendous factor 
that country is in world development. The talk lasted over 
an hour and at the end of this time the lecturer announced 
that he was ready to answer questions and would devote 
a half hour to that end. Imagine the surprise of the speak- 
er when the first question was put to him by a young wo- 
man who is the first assistant of the manager of one of 
the largest export houses in New York city. 

The question was: "Are the people of Brazil black, and 
do the women wear rings in their noses?" The speaker of 
the evening looked at his questioner very keenly and then, 
realizing the question was asked not as an insult, but out 
of simple ignorance, he made the clever reply that "very 
few of the women of his country were more beautiful than 
his questioner, and that they were just as white as she was 
and did not wear rings in their noses." 

Sao Paolo is the center of the richest coffee culture coun- 
try in the world. Because it is so much in the public eye, 
it is best that it should be known to our readers that Sao 
Paolo possesses many of the most beautiful and imposing 
modern and public buildings of any city in the world. Its 
citizens are enterprising and it has a population of more 
than five hundred thousand people. Its opera house is of 
such magnificence that it may he compared with the best 
playhouse in the whole world. 



— And once more America has provoked the hatred of 
Europe by her tactics: we have carried off most of the hon- 
ors in the Olympic games! 



TUSTIN RADIO 

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insures a continuous entertainment. 

Phone Garfield 6972 
Our New Location 128 Sutter Street San Francisco 



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Insist on a top-notch, satisfactory article, it's 

MONOGRAM 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 
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PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 
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14) Market St. 6717 Santa Fe Are. 






12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 2. 1924 




busy cvrii) 

PROFESSOR AND MRS. WINTHROP J. V. OSTERHOl'T have 
announced the engagement of their daughter, Miss Anna 
Maria Osterhout, to Theodore M. Edison, youngest son ot 
Mr and Mrs. Thomas A. Edison ot West Orange. New Jersey. 
Miss Osterhout is well known here, particularly in university 
circles Professor Osterhout having been on the faculty ot the 
University of California for years. Mr. Edison, whose father 
is the noted inventor, is a Harvard graduate and is identified 
with his famous father in his business enterprises. No date 
for the wedding has been set. 

MISS JEANETTE SESSIONS, daughter of Mrs. David Robert 
Sessions, and Alilo Edwin Rowell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Milo 
L Rowell of Fresno, were married at the New Church on 
Lvon street Tuesday. Rev. Mr. Blackmore ot the Sweden- 
borgian faith and pastor of the New Church, who recently 
came here from New York, read the marriage ritual. 

MISS LOLITA ROCA became the bride of Dr. Louis M. Rose of 
San Jose at a quiet ceremony, held last Tuesday at the resi- 
dence of Archbishop Edward J. Hanna in Fulton street. The 
bride is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Ramon Roca, and the 
great granddaughter of the late General Pacheco. Dr. Rose 
and his bride will make their future home in San Jose. 

MISS IRENE McMILLAN was married to Matthew Conley Tues- 
day night at St. John's Presbyterian Church in Berkeley. The 
Rev Edwin R. Strong officiated. The bride was attended by 
her sister. Miss Roxie McMillan, as maid of honor, and Philip 
Con'ey the brother of the groom, was best man. Matthew 
Conley is the son of Judge and Mrs. W. M. Conley of Mo- 
dera. 

MR. AND MRS. M. M. BROWN announced the engagement of 
their daughter. Miss Carol Maxine Brown, to Robert E. Mc- 
Donald at a recent afternoon garden party given by Miss 
Brown to a group of several score of her friends at the Brown 
home in Hillsborough. 

MISS GLADYS SELWOOD. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Gordon Selwood. and William Robert Carithers will be mar- 
ried on September 24 at Grace Episcopal Church in this city. 

LUNCHEONS 

MRS. CHEEVER COWDIN of New York gave a luncheon Mon- 
day at the Francisca Club, entertaining her sisters and sev- 
eral friends. 

MRS. J. CHEEVER COWDIN gave a luncheon party Wednesday 
in honor of her niece, Miss Edna Taylor, whose engagement 
to Bliss Rucker has occasioned a round of parties. 

MRS. SAMUEL KNIGHT was a luncheon hostess on Saturday 
at her home in Burlingame, when the guest of honor was 
Mrs. Cheever Bowdin of New Y'ork. Mrs. Harry Scott en- 
tertained her at luncheon on Tuesday. 

HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

MISS HELEN MAYRE. just home from Europe, was busy ex- 
changing greetings with her friends last Monday. Miss Mayre 
had as her guests the Misses Isabel and Lucia Sherman. 

MR. AND MRS. CHAS. P. WEEKS entertained Miss Pauline Fred- 
erick and a few members of her company. 

MISS FRANCES AMES was lunching with Miss La Boyteaux. 

MISS JANE CARRIGAN, a popular bride-to-be, lunched with 
Mrs. J. A. Folger. Mrs. Geo. Lent and Mrs. E. Avenali were 
another charming pair lunching together. 
TEAS 

MISS MARY GORGAS entertained for her grandmother. Mis. 
Kate C. McDongal, Monday, giving an enjoyable informal tea 
at the apartment of her father, Captain Miles Gorgas, on Pa- 
cific avenue. Mrs. Edward McCutcheon gave a tea for Mis 
McDougal on Friday. 

.MRS. WILLIAM W. DICK was hostess at a Sunday afternoon 
tea to have her friends meet her mother, Mrs. J. Somers 
Buist of Charleston, S. C, who is here on a visit dividing 
her time between the Presidio home of the Dicks and that 
o£ Commander and Mrs. E. K. Patton, the latter also a 
daughter of the visitor. 

MRS. ROBERT BERRY will he hostess at a tea on Tuesday, 
August 5, in honor of Miss Gladys Selwood and Miss Helen 
Forbes. The party is at the Berry home in Berkeley. 

MRS. FRANK DRAY gave a tea Wednesday in honor of Dr. So- 
phie Hart of Wellesley College. Dr. Hart has recently re- 
turned from the Orient. 



BRIDGE 

MRS. MARSHALL DILL and Mrs. Kirby Crittenden joined in 
arranging a most enjoyable afternoon party for friends in 
Ross Monday. Bridge and mail jongg. with tables under the 
trees, made a lively afternoon. Additional friends came in 
for the tea repast. 

DINNERS 

MR. AND MRS. WARREN SPIEKER were hosts at an informal 
supper party on Sunday evening, when they assembled a num- 
ber of the summer colony from Menlo Park and Woodside 
at their home. 

MR. AND MRS. ROGER LAPHAM were hosts at an informal 
dinner last Saturday evening given at their home in Menlo 
Park. 

MR. AND MRS. LAWRENCE McCREERY were the guests of 
honor at a supper party given Sunday evening by Mrs. Wil- 
liam Frew at the Montecito Country Club. Mrs. McCreery has 
been spending the past week in Montecito as the guest of 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Filer. 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS KENT entertained at a barbecue din- 
ner last Friday evening, motoring with their guests to the 
famous old Jory ranch on the Bolinas ridge for the occasion. 

MR. AND MRS. JULIAN THORNE gave a dinner dance for Mrs. 
Cheever Cowdin on Wednesday at Tait's-at-the-Beach. 

MR. AND MRS. ALEXANDER LILLEY entertained at a dinner 
dance Saturday at the Hotel Rafael in honor of their son. 
Mr, Neil Lilley. The Lilleys are living in Ross, where they 
are occupying the Kenneth Kingsbury house this summer. 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE THIERBACH (Marion Robbins I will 
give a small dinner party at their home at Ross on August 8. 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH O. TOBIN were hosts at a dinner party 
at the Burlingame Country Club Sunday. 

DANCES 

MISS AILEEN BRADY, who went East with Miss Spreckels on 
the vacht Venetia recently when the girls accompanied John 
D. Spreckels to New York and return, will have a dinner 
dance party for Miss Spreckels and her fiance shortly. 

IN" TOWN AM) OUT 

MRS. J. DUDLEY' PETERSON of New York is here as a guest 
of her brother, J. Studabaker Johnson, and Mrs. Johnson 
at Stanford Court. A round of informal affairs adds to Mrs. 
Peterson's stay here. 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES OTIS are at their home here alter a 
visit of several weeks at Washington, D. C. 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK RICE SHORT, with their daughter, Miss 
Nancy Short, have motored to Lake Tahoe, to remain at 
their summer place for several weeks. 

MRS. HENRY SAHLEIN and her small granddaughters, Wini- 
fred Green and Nancy Schwabacher, are spending the month 
of July at the Feather River Inn. 

MRS. GUSTAV ZIEL, Mrs. Alfred de Rois, Mrs. Harry D. John- 
son, Miss Marie Lichtenberg, Miss Charlotte Ziel and John 
Ziel are at their home at the San Rafael after several weeks 
at the Brockway-Tahoe Club. 

MRS. ALVINA HEUER WILSON, who has been at Santa Bar- 
bara and Los Angeles for weeks, has returned to her studio 
on Russian Hill. 

MR. AND MRS. ALMER NEWHALL of San Rafael have been 
making their cottage at Bolinas the scene of a series of en- 
joyable little house parties. Mrs. Sherwood Coffin and her 
children have been their guests for three weeks. 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT MILLER, who have been occupying 
the Bernard W. Ford home in Burlingame a few weeks, have 
returned to their own home in town. 

MR. AND MRS. BENJAMIN DIBBLEE returned Sunday to their 
home in Ross, from New York and Europe. They left here 
in May to be present at the wedding of Miss Marjorie Wool- 
sey and Mr. John Kittle, which took place on May S in New 
York. 

MR. AND MRS. AUGUSTUS TAYLOR returned Sunday to their 
home in Menlo Park from a week's visit at Lake Tahoe. 
where they were guests of Mr. and Mrs. George A. Pope. 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN .1. BARRETT, with their children, the 
Misses Gertrude and Irene Barrett and Messrs. Garret and 
John Barrett Jr., returned Sunday to their home in Jackson 
street from a visit of two weeks in Southern California. They 
spent most of their time in Coronado. 



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<L>4 



AND CALIFORNIA \DVERTISER 



13 



MRS. CLARENCE MUSTO is in Coronado with her daughters, 

the Misses Kathleen and Yvonne MustO, and tliey will lie 
away until tile end of August. 
Miss HELEN GARRITT has gone to Santa Barbara, where she 
is visiting Mrs. Richard Heiman, who has a house there for 
the season. 
MR. AND MRS. FRANK B. KING and their daughter, Miss 
Frances King, have returned to their home in Menlo Park 
from a visit at the Feather River Inn. 
MR. AND MRS. HARRY POETT are entertaining Miss Gertrude 
Murphy at their country place, and Mrs. Herbert Moffitt and 
Miss Alice 'Moffitt have with them Miss Claudine Spreckeis. 
MRS. RICHARD McCREERY and Mr. and Mrs. Ross Ambler 
Curran, who were with Mrs. Arthur Vincent at the Bourn 
country place in Grass Valley, are at Lake Tahoe to spend 
a couple of weeks with Mrs. George Pope. 
MR. AND MRS. CHARLES W. FAY have returned from Aptos, 
where they passed the week-end as house guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. William T. Sesnon. 
MR. AND MRS. STUART HALDRON will leave Monterey short- 
ly on a two weeks' yachting and fishing cruise. 
MR. AND MRS. HAROLD CAULF1ELD (Isabel Bannan) are 
home from their honeymoon, which was passed in Canada 
about Banff. Lake Louise and elsewhere. They have taken 
an apartment at Powell and California streets. 
MR. AND MRS. ROBERT MENZIES are at Bear Valley for a 

month, having taken the cottage of Mrs. George Boyd. 
MR. AND MRS. JOHN CASPER KITTLE, who have been occu- 
pying a home at Ross since their return a few weeks ago from 
their honeymoon, have taken a house in San Francisco. 
MISS EDITH GRANT, who has been away for many months vis- 
iting with friends abroad and seeing her relatives in Ireland, 
was in town Monday, a picture of radiant, girlish beauty as 
she greeted her friends. She had an informal luncheon party 
at the Hotel St. Francis. 
MR. AND MRS. DOUGLAS WILSON DODGE have returned from 
a two weeks' stay at Del Monte, when Mr. Dodge attended 
the Reserve Officers' training camp. 
MR. AND MRS. ROY CARRUTHERS are at the Fairmont Hotel. 
They have been at Banff. They will return to their home in 
New York shortly. 
MR AND MRS. WILLIAM M. STEVENSON, Miss Dorothy Stev- 
enson. Miss Mary Dennis Searles. Mr. Arthur, Mr. George and 
Mr. Henry Stevenson returned Wednesday to San Francisco 
after several months abroad. 
MR 4ND MRS. EUGENE MURPHY are spending several days 
at the Weber Lake Country Club. Their daughter. Miss Ger- 
trude Murphy, is still at Lake Tahoe where she is the guest 
of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Poett and Miss Evelyn Poett. 
MR. AND MRS. GAYLE ANDERSON of San Mateo are the latest 

summer arrivals at Santa Barbara. 
MR AND MRS. ALBERT HOUSTON SR. have taken an apart- 
ment at the Huntington. Mrs. Houston's sister, _ Mrs. Craig, 
is passing the summer with them. 
MR AND MRS. W. I. BROBECK and their son. William, who 
have he"ii abroad lor months, have returned to their home 
after a mosl enjoyable travel tour. 
INTIMATIONS 
MRS RALPH HUNTINGTON MINOR, who did much to endear 
herself to local society when she and Captain Minor main- 
tained their residence here, is delightfully mindful of her 
visiting California friends, who chance to he in Florence. 
Italy, this summer. She has been hostess to visiting Cali- 
foniians en several occasions this summer. 
MR. AND MRS CHARLES 1IOP.HS i Virginia Loop I are being 
congratulated on the arrival ot a daughter at Stanford Hos- 
pital in town. 
SIR. AND MRS. EL1ZALDIE of Manila, parents of Angel Eli- 
zaldie. whose betrothal to Miss Marie Spreckeis created some 
stir iu society recently, are due to arrive from New ^i ork 
iugust 5. They have been East and will ultimately go to 
their home in Manila following a visit here. It is probable 
that the Spreckels-Elizaldle wedding will he an event of the 
near future during the visit of the parents of the young man. 
MR. AND MRS GEORGE NEWHALI, have taken possession of 
their stone cabin at Snug Harbor at Lake Tahoe. and they 
are entertaining a small house party there. Mrs. Templeton 
Crocker joined them on Monday after having passed a week 
with Mr. and Mrs. George Pope at their Tahoe home. Mr. 
and Mrs Thomas Eastland, who were with the Newhalls last 
week, have returned to their home in Burlingame. 
Miss JANIE GRAVES, who has been living at Beverly Hills 
with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Walker Coleman Craves, was 
the guest I'l honor at a handsome birthday party given by 
her grandmother. \i - Loller. on Saturday afternoon 

,'t the Palace Hotel. 



MRS. JOHN II. CASSERLY and her sons. Mr. John Casserly Jr. 
and Mr. Michael Casserly, will arrive this week and will spend 
the rest of the summer at their San Mateo home. 

MAJOR AND MRS. VICTIM; MORRISON are being congratulated 
on the birth of a son at their home in Santa Barbara The 
baby is the third child in the family, the older children be- 
ing .Miss Patricia and Master Park Morrison. lie will be 
mimed Victor Morrison Jr. Mrs. Morrison is a sister of Mr. 
Howard Park of Burlingame. 

MRS. GEORGE N. ARMSBY and her son. Mr. George N. Armshv 
Jr., returned Friday to their home in Burlingame from New 
Yoik, where they have been spending several months. Mr. 
Armsby remained in the East and Mrs. Armsby and their son 
will join him there again late in August. Miss Leonora Arms- 
by, who went abroad during the winter, will not return to 
California until the autumn. 

MRS. ARMSTRONG TAYLOR, who is returning from Europe, is 
now in New York and is expected home within the next few 
weeks. Dr. Taylor has taken an apartment at the Hunting- 
ton. 

FEATHER RIVER INN 

MISS CAROLINE MADISON, Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Johnson and 
Miss Sparling, Mrs. Frank B. King and Miss Frances King, 
Wm. H. Noble, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard R. Wood and family, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. D. McBryde. Berrien P. Anderson are among 
the arrivals at Feather River Inn. 
DEL MONTE 

SADDLE AND BRIDLE featured this week one of the most in- 
teresting social gatherings at Pebble Beach, when nearly two 
score saddle enthusiasts raced in the first "Paperchase" of 
the season. Starting from the new stables at Del Monte Lodge 
and following miles of forest and ocean trails, finishing with 
a series of jumps, the exciting chase was led by two of the 
youngest equestriennes in the group that followed a trail 
of flowers over the course — Miss Frances Heckscher, daugh- 
ter of Mrs. G. Maurice Heckscher, and Miss Eleanor Fertig, 
daughter of Mrs. S. C. Fertig, of Pebble Beach. Among those 
who rode were: Mrs. Charles W. Clark of New York and 
Burlingame, and her daughters, the Misses Patricia, Agnes 
and Margaret; the Misses Frances and Nancy Heckscher; 
Miss Francena Henderson of Monterey; Miss Sally Cameron, 
Pasadena; the Misses Frances and Eleanor Fertig; Miss Flor- 
ence Boardman, Pebble Beach; Capt. P. F. Limbocker, Capt. 
H. A. Buckley, Capt. It. C. G. Gibbs, Capt. F. R. Lafferty, 
Lt. W. P. Withers, Major Cushman Hartwell, of the Monte- 
rey Presidio; Mr. I. G. Pattinson of Pasadena, who is spend- 
ing the summer at Carmel; and Mr. M. A. Fennell of Mon- 
terey. 

MRS. CHARLES W. CLARK, who is spending the summer at 
her Pebble Beach villa, entertained a group of the society 
set at a dinner dance on Sunday evening. The party was given 
at Del Monte Lodge. 

MRS. JULIAN B. HUFF of Philadelphia, cousin of Mrs. Charles 
Gould Morton, may visit San Francisco shortly. She is with 
Mrs. Maurice G. Hecksher and Misses Frances and Nancy 
flecksher. 



Clean Politics 

The candidature of Tallant Tubbs for State Senator is 
proceeding a]>ace. It has made a line impression upon the 
educated and refined part of the electorate and lias had a 
curiously sympathetic reaction from the mass of decent 
people. < Ine sees main- automobiles carrying the announce- 
ment of the candidate and there is an ever growing number 
of prominent men taking an active interest in the cam- 
paign. 

Only one who has been brought up in the environment 
and amongst the associations which young Tallant has been 
fortunate enough to have been placed in all his life, can 
afford to take the absolutely fearless and independent stand 
which has already characterized the political activity of 
Mr. Tubbs so far. 

It is all very encouraging and should tend to develop 
enthusiasm for politics on the part of many young men ol 
education and refinement. Indeed, the only way in which 
a democracy can flourish is through the active participa- 
tion in its affairs of men of the type of Tallant Tubbs. One 
cannot help thinking that the young men of ideals must 
sooner or later be impressed by the opportunity of usctul 
living that is possible for one who is not bound by mater- 
ial necessities, but can express himself freely and inde- 
pendent!) in the public forum. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 2, 1924 




By KEM 

"I Ihink poetry should surprise by a fine excess, and not by 
singularity; it should strike the reader as a wording of his own 

highest thoughts, and appear almost a remembrance Its 

touches of beauty should never be half-way, thereby making 
the reader breathless, instead of content. The rise, the progress, 
the setting of imagery, should like the sun. come natural to 
lim, shine over him, and set soberly although in magnificence, 
leaving him in the luxury of twilight." — Keats. 

LAUGHTER AND LONGING, by Nancy Buckley, is 
an attractive little book of poems, in its fourth print- 
ing this spring-. Nothing can better introduce it to readers 
than the foreword written for it by the late W. C. Morrow 

when it was first issued. He tells us: "San Francisco has 
again produced evidence of its witchery— its subtle power 
to wake vision and move it to gracious expression. In 
'LAUGHTER AND LONGING'. .. .Nancy Buckley has 

1 'resented another phase of that distinctively California 
music which, through her eminent predecessors and con- 
temporaries, has sung down the years in main- keys and 
modulations Here will be found, modestly, simply, sin- 
cerely disclosed, the fine insight of a delicate poetic soul 
joined to a cultured mind." Will not every one respond to 
the beauty, the mastery of phrase, the sympathy to be found 
in the following poem taken from this charming little vo% 
urae? 

"The Fog 
Like soft, sheer silken veil, it gently fell 
Across the City's face, and wove it's spell 
Of happiness upon those tired hearts 
That played, through weary hours, bitter parts. 
And little, darting dreams of long ago, 
Came fluttering near, so soft and low. 
\\ ith tender eager wings And golden rays 
Of truant beams escaped from happier days, 
Fell on each restless, tired heart and hand. 
And made the misted world seem Fairyland." 

The Cloister Press, $1. 

* * * 

Till'. PERFECT WIFE, by Phyllis Bottome, is one of 
the English novels out this spring that provokes endless 
comment and discussion. It is the story of Anne Elliott, 
a young married woman, who has made a happy home for 
her husband and self for more than ten years and then 
suddenly rinds out he has fallen in love with a young girl. 
In Spite of the torture of giving him up. she does it tact- 
fully, sincerely and legally. And more — she lakes the crude 
young girl, who has been so unwittingly fascinating, and 
educates her for her coming married life with her ex-hus- 
band. In spile of the delicate and awkward situation she 
holds their respect, liking ami friendship, and after mar- 
riage accepts their invitation to visit them. The fortunate 
couple are spending an extended honeymoon at an Italian 
paradise, in the mountains. Here come Anne and Toby, 
their life-long friend, who had never married because of 
his love for Anne. It is an unparalleled quartet. Anne, 
who for ten years had been looking out for Norman's well- 
being, an on-looker, obliged to protect her preverse voting 
rival who had no intention of mothering her new husband; 



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tempermental Norman, who wishes his young wife had 
all of Anne's perfection and yet would never think of giv- 
ing her up, and Toby, who alone, really understands and 
appreciates Anne of whom he has once said: "Anne has 
all the dignity in the world, but she hasn't an ounce of 
assurance. She'll never fight back. She'll be a girl to the 
end of her life, with none of the weapons of a woman." 
And we can understand Toby better after he consoles the 
young wife who confesses to him she has struck her new 
husband, Norman: — 

"Well, thank God, somebody did," exclaimed Toby hast- 
ily. "I mean I beg your pardon, but I've no doubt he jolly 
well earned it." 

The splendid artistry of the writer handles the whole 
situation in a convincing manner. The average woman 
reader resents so "perfect a wife," wants to shake her, to 
have none of her. but the more mature women — with un- 
derstanding — with the light of unselfed love in their eyes, 
approve and applaud her. While it would be very com- 
fortable to feel on closing this very worth-while taintless- 
ly gripping book, that Toby had earned the reward of his 
years of yearning for Anne, and to leave her consoled with 
the richness of it. yet is not the writer a truer exponent 
of human nature than we are — when she gives us the "Per- 
fect Wife's" last explanation to Toby: "If I could stop feel- 
ing that I was his wife any thing might be possible. 

But I've never stopped feeling it." 

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Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

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August 2, 1924 



\XI) CALIFORNIA \DVERTISER 



15 




FREE WILL 

by 
Madefrey Odhner 
Some search for God upon the mountain's peak. 
To see bright hair in streamers light the sky, 

Scune in the slash of lightnings see His eve 
And in the voice of thunders hear him speak; 
While some in starlit hush a spirit seek. 

Whose still, small voice is neither far nor high; 

Within, around, the soughing of a sigh. — 
Props -crutches — godlings of the weak. 
I must see God in every human face. 

In every bestial snarl, in every frown, 
In every anguished tear, or mad grimace; 

Must see this Sheer Perfection reaching down 
And sending forth a Sermon on the Mount; 
Must see Him, and must hold Him to account. 



IN AFRICA 

Be glad, Africa, for that sun 

Which strikes the white man down — 
The white man with his sample-bag. 

His railroad, his tin town. 
The sweating progress which he brings 
To rob you of the ease of kings. 
Yours is the wild and lovely land 

Untouched by human blight; 
Yours is the wilderness' last stand. 

Beauty's last desperate light. 
Fever and tse-tse and fierce sun — 
Without them you were soon undone! 



THE OLD-TIMER 

We found him where the lion had left off; 

He'd tried just once too often that fool pass 
<">l hunting wounded simba in tall grass; 

He'd learned his lesson, he who used to scoff. 
We left him there beneath a pile of stones. 
To guard from further crunching his cracked bones. 
There wasn't much he'll left us to thumb o'er; 

His knife, his gun — a good bunduke too. 
Three-seventy-five — but cartridges too few; 



1 lis boj had cornered all the scant food 
\n extra shirt, tobacco, matches, hat — 

... letter — he'd been "ill loo long for thai' 
Socks, dirty blankets, salt, a frying pan. 

Two koodoo hides, the best I've evei seen; 

Then, wrapped in a torn linen, almost clean. 

i M all fool things — a white-lace, spangled fan. 
i .iris haven't used those now for thirty years; 
lie must have trekked it round the hemisphere ! 



TANGANYIKA 

High headlands dreaming in the sun; 

A stretch of solitary shore, 

Crossed only by the lion's spoor 
Or by the antelope's worn run. 

Where, blue as bluest lapis-lazuli, 

\\ ash in the waves of Tanganyika's sea. 
What immemorial time has seen 

Unchanged the lovely lonely land, 

Unscarred to solitary strand ! 
How still the ages here have been! 

Doom is upon it — the white curse 

Of Progress and the Jingling Purse! 

— Cecil John, in "Poetry. 



World Tour in Seventeen Days 

Complete time-tables for a round-the-world passenger 
service which will accomplish the journey in seventeen days 
have been worked out by experts of Imperial Airways, Ltd., 
the new British organization. 

Fresh links have been mapped out for the 27.000-mile air- 
line, and tests are to be made with airships of enormous ca- 
pacity. Passengers will leave London by the morning ait- 
express for Paris, which maintains a speed of 105 miles 
an hour. The}' may expect to reach Constantinople the 
following morning and Cairo by midday. 

A long-distance airship will take them from the Egyp- 
tian capital to Australia, arriving on the ninth day after 
leaving London. 

The air travellers will cross the Pacific to San Fran- 
cisco in another giant airship, and will cross the United 
States by areoplane express. New York will be reached 
on the fifteenth day. This link is already established. 

The Atlantic crossing to Europe will be made by the great 
airship liner soon to be delivered to the United States by 
the Zeppelin Company. 

The airship voyage to Europe is scheduled so that world- 
travellers, gliding down at London, will accomplish in sev- 
enteen days what took Jules Verne's imaginary hero eighty 
days. 



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16 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 2, 1^24 



LEISURE'S WW 




OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

75m Moore- 



Conducted by Thomas Ashe 



Selling Entertainment 

We ar; taking what is sold to us, 
and we are forced to buy it. The the- 
atrical business is like the clothing- 
business; people buy entertainment the 
same as they purchase apparel ; inci- 
dentally, too, they seem mainly guided 
in selecting by what is "the" thing in 
raiment, and — entertainment. The 
"crowd" sets the standard, and an in- 
definable something impels the falter- 
ing to act like the majority. 

I saw a little play one day last week, 
and I wonder why there were not mure 
like it. I refer to "Spring Cleaning" at 
the Curran theater; good dialogue, a 
moral — if you wish — and a clever anal- 
ysis of human nature. It was ably ren- 
dered, it was clean, and it received de- 
served applause. Then, as I thought of 
other plays. I asked : Are theater goers 
sunk to that third rate state of men- 
tality to which one must allocate a 
people who will enthuse over the half- 
baked, insipid, plotless, humorless 
things that crowd the stage and screen ? 
Or, is it mob psychology whereby a 
single handicap or a titter induces oth- 
ers, who sense they stupidly over- 
looked a favorable point, to forthwith 
thunder their handclaps and give forth 
a tempest of titters? I was musing on 
how. another evening, I agonized 
through a headline vaudeville act — a 
compound of mediocre dancing, inar- 
ticulate utterances, painfully forced hu- 
mor and questionable aspirated sing- 
talks! From the dollar and a halvers 
to the two-bitters came vociferous ap- 
proval of the act; so, who will blame 
managers if they continue selling this 
particular, cheaply purchased, theatri- 
cal merchandise to the public, for, to 
the former, applause is proof of enter- 
tainment pudding? 

I understand the class who avidly 
buy the nude, the risque, or the vul- 
gar in drama, but totally fail to ac- 
count for the lowly mentals who can 
extract entertainment out of those in- 
sults of intelligence foisted upon us 
with such monotonous regularity. 

In regard to the movies: The per- 
iod is almost forgotten when we 
trooped en masse to "nickelodians" 
solely to witness the working of that 
marvellous invention, the moving pic- 
ture; anything, then, cast on the white 
sheet thrilled us and we stood not on 
the order of the subject's merit; we 
were concerned only with the miracle 



of the thing. Today, that has all worn 
off; the seven day wonder now is in 
the same class as the steamboat, trol- 
ley car. one-piece bathing suit and 
bobbed hair; but, what has replaced 
the obsolete incentive to go to the 
"nick"? With few exceptions — and most 
of these, importations — the weakling 
silver screen releases have to lie bol- 
stered up with vaudeville, revelation 
of actors' and actresses' bluebearding 
escapades, costly settings, high paid 
orchestras and press agent tales of 
fabulous sums olitlayed for principals' 
salaries and for production. Attendance 
is coaxed on by lurid depiction on bill- 
board and published innuendos as to 
the shame likely to be revealed in the 
witnessing. And, millions in America 
— we are called the most enlightened 
people on the earth 1 — buy this sort of 
entertainment — actually pay to have 
their intelligence insulted. 

Shrewd theatrical merchants know 
their customers, set the entertainment 
styles, and by judicious advertising, 
see to it the "most enlightened people 
on the earth" buy up all they have to 
sell. It goes; why should they alter 
the scheme of things? Only the hand- 
ful take umbrage at the low appraise- 
ment put on their mentality. 

— Tin urns Ashe. 



k 



Orpheum 

"It's on the Orpheum circuit" has 
come to connote superior entertain- 
ment — it has become the accepted 
thing to go there for better vaude- 
ville, and. you invariably get it there. 
Hut. on occasions one's intelligence is 
sore pressed to accept the applause ver- 
dict accorded some acts as indicative 
of their actual worth — the critic is in- 
clined to either weaken in faith in him- 
self to properly appraise, or he men- 
tally lashes the applauders' lack of in- 
dividuality in applauding, apparently, 
because it's an Orpheum act. Blossom 
Seeley. Bennie Fields and company, in 
a potpourrie of syncopation, are head- 
liners and holdovers this week and we 
fail to see why they are either, liar- 
ring flashy apparel and a beautiful set- 
ting, they are nude of merit-but. they 
get a good hand! Possibly, because 
"It's at the Orpheum" operates to 
make folk believe it's worthy. Rich- 
ard Bennett, in "To Let," a sketch by 
Elliot Nugent and Howard Lindsay, 
has a fine piece of nonsense that he 



and his capable support handle in a 
delightful way. It is a satire on apart- 
ments and is full of laughable situa- 
tions. Neville Fleeson, composer of 
popular songs, and Ann Greenway, in 
"Samples," have a refreshing bit of en- 
tertainment embracing period singing 
and costuming, unique and deserving 
of the applause they receive. Ben Mer- 
off and his symphonic orchestra in- 
dulge in a series of music and antics 
that keeps the house in tumult; Meroff 
is an unusual dancer and excellent mu- 
sician and our only regret is that a 
number or two of the classical are not 
rendered by him and his clever mu- 
sicians. Stan Stanley, "Nature's No- 
bleman of the Theater," and his sup- 
porters, have an array of antics that 
are convulsing; most of it is played 
from the audience which adds to its 
spice. The Le Grohs. in a pantomimic 
novelty, are contortionists exhibiting 
such unbelievable feats you wonder if 
they can possibly return to normal. A 
"Big Surprise" at the finish consists 
of the reappearance of Blossom Seeley 
and Bennie Fields in connection with 
Ben Meroff and orchestra. It is prin- 
cipally worth while because of addi- 
tional gymnastic stepping by Meroff. 



Strand 

In Cosmo Hamilton's latest novel 
picture, "Another Scandal." Lois Wil- 
son has the stellar role this week at the 
Strand. The story is a society drama 
centering around an unprincipled wo- 
man who tries to lure another woman's 
husband from her and fails. How hus- 
band and wife are reunited after a ser- 
ies of misunderstandings entails many 
dramatic situations ending in an in- 
teresting climax. Holmes Herbert, as 
the husband, is pleasingly masculine 
and a capable actor. Hedda Hopper is 
well set as are the supporting com- 



I 



& you pay no more* 

Ibestflowe^ 

i 

"Tne %ice o/"a Thousand Gardens" *r j 

2 24-226 Grant Ave. Tel. Kearny 4975 j 
1-4. 




STAGE Training 

NATHANIEL ANDERSON 
Coach 

Director — Pacific Players 

THE LEGITIMATE WAY 

This is actual practice: no theory nor 
false methods; vital; professional. 

STUDIO 

500 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Kearny 5454 



Ugust 2, l"-'4 



AND CALIFORN] \ ADVERTISER 



17 



l>an v. ()n the l>ill are a comedy, World 
News Kiijograms and a program of ex- 
cellent music rendered by Rudy's or- 
chestra including a piano selection, 
"Autumn," played by Rudy, a "Sla- 
vonic Rhapsody" and a vocal solo, 
"Memory Lane," which Bennie Her- 
man renders effectively. 



Miss O'Neil at the Greek Theater 

Just because it was Nance < >'Xeil 
the Greek theater was crowded to see 
her in the play of "Mary Magdalene." 
Miss O'Neil presents a regal appear- 
ance at all times but as Magdalene she 
was particularly impressive. Her sup- 
port was good and the very large ar- 
ray of talent was extraordinarily effec- 
tive. It may be said that Miss O'Neil 
was easily the strongest element in the 
presentation of the play and it may also 
be predicted that those fortunate 
enough to have seen her will make it 
a point to gather again in crowds to 
see her in Hamlet when that play is 
staged. Ralph Pincus, who had charge 
of the production of Magdalene, will 
put Hamlet on for Miss O'Neil. 



Cameo 

"Pagan Passions!" Suggestive title! 
I wondered just what the screen 
would portray, last Saturday evening, 
when I sat with a friend listening to 
Tom Cooper's Melody Moments, at the 
Cameo. When the first scene was 
flashed on, this friend of mine, as fa- 
miliar with the Orient as with the Oc- 
c i d e n t. exclaimed enthusiastically : 
"Why, that is splendid acting! The 
whole thing is full of the fascinating, 
subtle, mysterious atmosphere of Chi- 
na ! And Rosemary Theby rises to the 
heights of Duse's tragedy, in the play- 
that the Cameo put on for her. just be- 
fore her death!" All the actors, which 
include Wyndham Standing. Raymond 
McKee, Tully Marshall and Barbara 
Bedford, in this tale of the East, 
seemed to be unusually good; from the 
heroine's characterization of the white 
woman dragged into the depths of the 
poppy's serfdom, to the virtuous and 
conventional wife whose husband she 
steals. This Saturday comes Tom Mix 
in "Ladies to Board." 



Warfield 

Saturda) "The Marriage (/heat" 
comes to the Warfield for an engage- 
ment of seven days. This is the re- 
markable bit of photography made b) 
rhomas II. tnce among the islands of 
the south seas, Tahiti in particular. It 
is the gripping story of one man's love 
lor another man's wife; the Storj of 
a soldier of the cross on a far flung 
frontier. " ["he Marriage Cheat" is not 
jazz, neither is it simply a "sex" story. 
rather would one call it a "drama of 
B soul in torment." The cast is headed 
by Beatrice Joy, Percy Marmont, 
Adolphe Menjou and l.aska Winters. 



In addition there will be shorter film 
subjects including a comedy, news 
weekly and the "local lafs." 

On the stage Ranchon and Marco 
will stage an oriental fantasy for Jue 
Pong, the sensationally successful Chi- 
nese tenor who is coming back to the 
Warfield for a one week's engagement. 
Jue Fong is a student at Washington 
University and it is only during the 
summer holidays that he is available 
for theatrical engagements. There will 
be a score of other artists. Lipschultz 
and the Music Masters will be heard 
in concert among other attractions. 



— A little girl, wrote in her diary: — 
"Got up at seven; went to bed at 
eight." Mother suggested that it would 
sound better to say. "Rose at seven." 
The child thereupon scratched out the 
entry and wrote: "Rose at seven; set 
at eight." 



— On his tour of the district an in- 
spector of schools appeared before a 
class of girls. He wrote upon the 
blackboard. "BXXX." Then, peering 
over the rims of his spectacles at a 
good-looking girl in the front row, he 
asked: — "Young lady, I'd like to have 
you tell me what that means." "Love 
and kisses," the girl replied. 



IMielands 



it new process does it/ 



Be photographed this year on your 
: Birthday 



j Studios 111 all Brine 
j Oaklnml 
! ins Mih St. 
+ 



al Cities of California 
San Francisco 
4 1 (Irnnt Ave. 



NOTICE TO CIEEOITORS 
RatatC 0# Paul Smlini, derea*ed 

X... 89421, Dept. 9 
Nol Ice is hereby given by the undersigned. 
W J Hyn.es, administrator of the eats 
Paul Sodini, deceased, to the creditors of and nil 
na having claims against the said decedent, 
them with the net'rssary vouchers within 
I i t months after the first publico t [i 
this notice, in the office of the Clerk of the Su- 
Courl of the State of California. In and 
for the City and County of San Francisco, or to 
exhibit them with the necessary vouchers within 
four y\\ months after the first publication of this 
to the said administrator, at his office. 858 
rhelan Building. San Francisco, California, 
which said last-named office the undersigned 
selects as his place of business in all m 
connected with said estate of Paul Sodini. 
leces » 

W J HTXF.S. 
Administrator of the Estate of Paul Sodini, 
s,?d. 
Dated, San Francisco, California. July 16, 1924. 
Cullinan A Hickey, 

Attorneys for Administrator. 



"Miss California 
Gowned 

in Ran Francisco Styles" 
is a page which will cer- 
tainly interest the wo- 
men readers, as it shows 
in a dozen poses the at- 
tractive and San Fran- 
ciscan made wardrobe to 
be worn by Miss Cali- 
fornia at the Atlantic 
City Pageant. Another 
page which will attract 
feminine readers is 
"Foreign Fashions and 
Foibles," posed by stun- 
ning models. 

"The Greatest 
Lover" 

Showing Valentino i n 
love scenes with Bebe 
Daniels, Doris Kenyon 
and Lois Wilson, graces 
t the title page. There are 
some graphic scenes 
showing "What a Torna- 
do Does" ; some scenes 
from "Jerusalem To- 
day"; a. few pictures 
taken "In Serious 
Vein"; some "Smuggling 
Dope" from San Fran- 
cisco, and some charm- 
ing views of "The Big 
Trees of California." 
Place your order now 
for the 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



SUMMONS 

In the Superior Courl of the State of California 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. No. 147893. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California In and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and the complaint Bled 
in i he office of the ' i ilerh of said City 

;i :■'! > '•■unty. 

Mary Aruksar, Plaintiff, va Alexander Aruk- 
sar, i >efendant. 

The People of the State of California Send 

< freel Ings to: Alexand' endant 

Vi.ti are hereby required to appear In an ac- 
i ion bri ugh.1 a . .■ insl j ou bj 
Plaintiff In the Superior Courl of the St 
California, In and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, and t" answer the Complaint 
herein within ten days (exclusive of the 
day of service) after the servic on you of this 
summoi d within this City and County; 

< r if served elsewhere within thirty i 

The said action Is brought to obtain a Judg- 
ment and decree of this Courl diss.. hint: the 
of matrimony now existing between 
plaintiff an. 1 on the ground of de- 

nt's willful desertion, al» ral re- 

ts will more fully appear In the Complaint 
or file, to which erence is hereby 

made. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
as above required, the said 

iff will take judgment for any money or 
damages demanded in the complaint as arising 

trt for 

■ : 

n under my hand and the Seal of the Su- 
perior Court of the State of California, in and 

for the City and Countv of San Franci- 

i >ated June 

H. I MULCRHVY, Clerk. 
By W. R, Castagnetto, Depsty Clerk. 
AUSTIN LEWIS. 

178 Mills Bldg- San Francisco. Callt. 
Attorney for Plaintiff. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 2, 1924 




That conditions of demand and sup- 
ply in the automobile industry simply 
reflect general business conditions is 
shown by the statements of clothing, 
shoes, real estate, building — in fact all 
branches of manufacturing and mer- 
chandising, according to Captain E. V. 
Rickenbacker. 

"Just because the motor car enters 
more intimately into the lives of more 
families than any other commodity, it 
naturally responds more quickly to in- 
fluences of employment, weather and 
other conditions," says this authority. 
"If people do not buy clothing, hard- 
ware, furniture — if they don't build or 
buy new houses — then the merchant 
and the builder can't buy automobiles. 
This was a bad spring for all season- 
able lines of business. If you don't be- 
lieve it ask any department sfore. Few 
people realize to what an extent weath- 
er affects general trade. A department 
store manager told me recently that, 
on a certain fine, warm day his store 
was literally mobbed by customers. 
'Buying was like boom times,' he said. 
'And the next day it rained again ; and 
the air was raw. Not only was the 
store empty of buyers but hundreds of 
those customers of the previous day, 
failed to appear for their try-ons and 
forfeited their deposits.' 

"When you consider that, according 
to the weather bureau this was the 
coldest spring in fifty years ; that it 
rained nearly eighty days consecutive- 
ly in most states; that it is Presiden- 
tial year with all the temerity and cau- 
tion that quadrennial period always en- 
genders among buyers; and when you 
consider that in the first six months 
of 1924, the automobile industry built 
and sold as many cars as in the same 
period of 1923 ; and that the total cash 
value was more than for the first half 
of that record year — well one wonders 
what all the carping is about !" 



Ajax Lighters 

Ajax Auto Parts Co., Racine, Wis., 
announce as the latest unit to their line 
a very interesting Electric Cigar and 
Cigarette Lighter for instrument-board 
mounting on both open and closed 
cars. 

In contrast to the conventional types 
of lighters, the Rex Red Devil is very 
novel, there being no winding cables, 
reels, or inside switches. It is strong- 
ly built, and should give years of use- 
ful service. 

The construction shows considerable 
ingenuity and seems to mark a new 
era in cigar lighters for motor cars. 
The lighter consists essentially of a 
base- which fits against the instrument- 
board of car, and at the bottom is ex- 



tended to form spark catcher and ash- 
tray, a large heat-unit mounted on a 
mica plate near the top of this base, 
and a spring-hinged cover which con- 
tains the automatic switch and has at 
its center a hole through which the 
heat-unit is visible. Proper wires for 
connecting the lighter to the electric 
system of car are provided. 

The operation is very easy and in- 
teresting. When the cover is pressed 
forward with the finger-tips, the heat- 
unit instantly flashes to a bright red 
heat. Touching the end of cigar to 
the heat unit lights it very thoroughly. 
This is dime with one hand, and re- 
quires not over five seconds. 



Auto Trunks 

AUTOMOBILE TRUNKS AND 

TRUNK RACKS 

W. It. Malm & Co. 

2010 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



; 1140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin 3686 




Franklin Declares Regular Quarterly 
Dividend 

Directors of the H. H. Franklin 
Manufacturing Company, manufactur- 
ers of the Franklin car, has declared 
the regular quarterly dividend of 1J4 
per cent, payable August 1. on Frank- 
lin preferred stock. 

Officials of the company say that 
Franklin business showed an immedi- 
ate increase following the introduction 
iif the model with 4') per cent increase 
in power. 



Over 100 Cities Now Have Automobile 
Association's Towing Service 

In mure than 100 strategically lo- 
cated cities and towns, official mechan- 
ical service stations are now furnish- 
ing free mechanical first aid and tow- 
ing to members of the California State 
Automobile association. 

Whether a member of the Automo- 
bile Association be merely visiting his 
neighbors, on a shopping trip to his 
local town or touring over the prin- 



I Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

, Metal Work Appertaining: to Automobiles 
I, Oxy-Acetylene Welding: — Blacksmlthlng 
| II- W. Culver M. Daberer E. Johnson 



cipal highways of the state, he will find 
his helpful service available to him 
without charge in over 100 communi- 
ties. 

Whenever a motorist is stalled mi 
the road, out of gasoline or oil, with 
ignition trouble, a burned out bearing, 
or in distress from any other cause, a 
telephone call to the nearest official 
mechanical service stations brings a 
service car to his assistance. If his car 
cannot be started, or is wrecked, it 
will lie towed to the service station 
without charge. 

Free tire changes, which are pro- 
vided fur women motorists driving 
alone, are another popular feature of 
the service which is making the Au- 
tomobile Association's service more in- 
dispensible than ever to women mo- 
torists. 



— "I don't think I'll go rowing with 
you. Hubert!" "Why. Doris?" "Be- 
cause you do nothing but hug the bank 
all the time!" 





GET INTO THE BOAT AND SEE FOR YOURSELF 



Our Invitation to You 

A ride in a Johnson equipped boat will show 
you why water enthusiasts bought inure 
Johnson Motors last year than any other 
make. 

Simply tell us where and when and we shall 
be glad to arrange a demonstration. 

Your vacation or week-end outings need no 
longer be restricted to the over-crowded 

hitrhwavs — 



DEALERS 
WANTED 



A. G. IIEBGEN 



BOATS 
Distributor CANOES 

toward si. s a „ Francisco, Cal. MARINE ENGINES 



Tel. (iurllrlil 



.-,1111 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell ami Lartdn Streets 
I'honc Franklin i> 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 
Luncheon (11:80 to 2 p. in.).. 75c 

Dinner, Work Days S1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays $1.75 



ipen Every Day from S a. m. to p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

Tin- Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Fraiu'ist :o 
»;.'. Post Street, Near Market street 

lii ■ ECearny 4536 

■ ■ ii Special Sunday Dinners, $1.25 
Ser\vd a la "'arte. Also Regular 
h and Italian Dinners 



i 

+ - 
+ - 



Fish ami Game a Specialty 



Louis Cerles, Jean Barrere. 
John Piegth, Props. 



5fam i>l)aron (Brill 

Formerly Bergez-Frank's Old Poodle 
Dog. Bush St. 

French Table-D'Hote Dinner Served 
Sundays & Holidays, $1.25 

:?r> New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel. Phone Sutter 8068 






+ 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open S a. m. to 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 116. San Bruno, Cal. 



*- 
*- 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, :i5r per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



+"— 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

I ippoBite Palace 1 [otel 
Phone Kearny :S!)l San Francisco 

+ 



+ - 



GANTNER & MAISON 



Funeral Directors 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 

Bet. ISth and 19th Sts. 
Telephone Market 64 San Francisco 



Every Woman 

Should 

Look Her Best 

Keep her hair trimmed, shingled 
or bobbed* 

AT 

Cosgrove's flair Store 



815 Clonuiit St. f 



Sa n 



• ranrisco. 



:!)>*> Geary St. ( 

2SB1 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley 

(Established 28 Years. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



+ 

+ 



.;. 



Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Soiiif tliink that a vigorous brushing once 
or twice a day is taking very good care 
of them. Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your 
teetli which only a competent dentist can 
take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound us you Imagine. 
A toothache means trouble; do not wait 
for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy 
teeth faster than decay. Are your teeth 
sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAX FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 335 
SPECIALISTS — Extraction!; Crowns: 
Self Cleaning Bridges; Poreelain Work 
unci Roofless Plates. 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



I P arisian Dyeing and Cleaning ] 

snils l're->*'d by Band, Only — 
snil- (ailed for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

('■■ri-irtn Dyeing and Cleaning 



">! I Post street 
lit Virginia Hotel 



Sun Franci-.cn | 
[Minne Franklin 2510 j 




N, W CORNER 







A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and :i series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering lli<" Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed Cor 
two years, Surface may be cleaned with 
2oal oil, "!■ gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREKT 
Prospect :}418-l*hom's-Prosp(H't 341!> 

WHAT HFST SKKVES THE PI ISLIC 
1IEST SERVES IS 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



MOTOR OIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON / 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Garneld 3026 



Palmer Graduate 



Hours 1 to 1 and 2 to 6 

DR. W. N. CLAYTON 

Chiropractor 

Western States Life Bulldlnr 
i Market Street San FrancUro 



i2«S2«£&< ijs2* *Z£* KS, 4 K& 4 K& 4V !& 4 *£•* *!£. 4 KS, 4 *«£* KSS 4 *^ 4 K& K£> 4 K2&K& 4 K& 4 *i£, 4 KS 4 K& 4 KSS 4 K£. 4 KiSfKS 4 K& 4 KlS 4 K&KS 4 fc ^>* KS 4 fc 2fi* *&. 4 *££* >*£< k-jji »2*o;£< *;*;*►;♦;«;*,;* Mi* *i£" V 



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££ 
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£g 
II 

E'S 
M 



going away 




6% 



'tfC/7 cor ojberated\E£ 
hjj reliable 
chauffeurs 
'/to l/iorouo/ili/ under- 



ANYWHERE 

Southern Pacific opens the way 
to wherever you want to go. 

Join the thousands who rely up- 
on Southern Pacific for active in- 
terest in their going-away plans. 

Communicate with any South- 
ern Pacific Agent tor courteous, 
accurate, travel information. 

Its comfort. Safety and conven- 
ience make Southern Pacific ser- 
vice worth more to you than any 
other form of transportation. 

Southern Pacific 



stand their Jbus/ness 



This means that you can 
dispense with all wor- 
ries as to personal se- 
curity when using our 
cars. Our drivers are 
careful and they never 
violate your desires for 
safety. 




Thone Franklin 317 
1620 Pine Street 
San Francisco 



^1EP^ 



65 Geary St. 



PERRY STATION 
Phone Sutter 4000 



Third St. Station 



Auto Trunks 

made to order to 
fit any car or rack 



u 

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kI 




Wizard LunchKit Co. 

1801 Divisadero St., San Francisco 
Walnut 1043 



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M 

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GRAY 

Luggage Carriers 



The ideal 



way to carry your trunk or outing 
equipment 



Installed behind your spare tire 




The combined rear 



bumper 
carrier 



and folding luggage 



Prices $20.00 and up 
For all makes of cars 



GRAY AUTO EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

Factory and Main Office 
569 Third Street, Oakland 

THE SAFETY HOUSE, INC. 

135 6 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco, Calif. 






ESTABLISHED JULY SO, 1K5A 

SAN FRANCISCO 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



California Advertiser 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 9, 1924 



$5.00 PER YEAR 




LOS ANGELES 



■H.III- 




TABLE of CONTENTS 



Did you know that the riches of California were proverbial over four cen- 
turies ago? That the early invaders of California were Mongolians? Read 
"THE ROMANCE OF CALIFORNIA INDUSTRIES" by REGINALD 
BERKELEY now running as a serial in the News Eetter. 



Do we ever marry our ideals? Perhaps your experience is similar to the 
man's in this week's story: "THE GIRE HE NEVER MET?" by Philip 

Van Doren Stern. 



Concise and instructive is our new department "COMMENT ON FOREIGN 
AFFAIRS" written by one of the beslt authorities on international politics 

in the West. 



The difference between a reactionary and progressive is explained bv < I'Dowd 
in the TEMPLE OF DISCORD. 



Nathaniel Andersen's essays in WHEAT AND CHAFF have been com- 
pared with Carlyle's by his admirers. 



LIBRARY TABLE 



SOCIETY 

FINANCIAL 



PLEASURE'S WAND 



ift'ai 



iKKHSSS HK K H H U K S K '/. !X ^ 2 R^K^Ka!! K X » " K .« ~ - 

l5js*Sa's)!»»!!««a'sfa»ss.?3S»?.«.?=S«SS.' 







The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolldationswlth other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

Assets $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 446,024.41 

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PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

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Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

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AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



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SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



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EaUblUtud July 10. ISM 

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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, AUGUST 9, 1924 



Vol. CV 



No. 6 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. Russ Building. 235 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
Calif. Telephone Douglas C853. Entered at San Francisco. Calif., Post 
Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill. E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 



— If there is a poetical preference among wets, it must 
be Burns instead of Dryclen. 

— "When a woman is in love she acts like a fool. When 
a man is in love he is not acting'." — Jester. 

— "A state without the means of some change is without 

the means of its conservation." — Edmund Burke. 

* * * 

— "You're a reactionary!" shouts the soap box orator, 
"if you happen to remark that the country is not going to 

the dogs." 

* $ $ 

— There are going to be numerous pipe dreams before 
now and next November, and some of them will be regular 

night mares. 

* * * 

— At the annual field day of the Sacramento police, one 
of the prizes awarded in a race for women was a haircut. 

shampoo and marcel. 

* * * 

— Hiram Johnson's recent sinking into the oblivion of 
silence, may yet have the effect of making him one of the 

most popular notable men in the country. 

* * * 

— Perhaps the whole secret of Ford's success as "a 
manufacturer of perambulators'' as our English cousins 
call him, is t\\w to the fact that he once drove a balky 

horse 

* * * 

— Archimedes was the first to employ "death rays" in 

time of war. lie burned the Roman galleys in the siege 

of Syracuse by the concentration of rays projected by sun 

mirrors in the third century 1 J >. C. 
* ' * * 

— The other day we were shown the picture of a local 
girl and told she was to marry a Jap. We didn't sense any- 
thing awry about the incident until we were told she was 

a white person. 

* * * 

—"Not more than 40 per cent of our population now own 
their homes. Main apartments have shrunk to one room 
and bath. We are living on a diminutive scale. Kitchen- 
ettes provide our breakfast, luncheonettes supply ice cream 
soda and a ham sandwich, and now one may assemble the 
fainib m a diningette for the serious meal of the day. The 
census maj soon designate as a 'familyette' the maiden lady 
with two goldfish," -ax- Arthur D. Little in Atlantic Month- 
ly. 



— So the air mail service is really going to be established 
on a permanent and, it is thought, a paving basis. There 
is at present a deficit of two and three-quarters millions, 
but Lawrence C. Phipps of Colorado, who is here, says 
that it will soon pay. Three flights in a hundred fail and 
that is a small percentage considering the newrtess of the 
industry and the length of the flights. Some day this city 

will he a great air center. 

* * * 

— From somewhere in the audience the shrill laughter 
of children comes to us, apparently provoked by some sex- 
ual vulgarity thrown on the screen, and we are appalled 
by the thought that children are witnessing pictures ob- 
scene enough to make even oldsters blush. Where are 
their parents, and what sort of parents will allow their 
offspring to go to these disgusting problem plays? Our 
only hope is that these youngsters do not understand what 

they are laughing at. 

* * * 

— Apropos, a teacher of French in the public schools 
was amusing us the other night by relating some of the 
incidents in connection with certain "love affairs" of her 
pupils, ranging in age all the way from six to sixteen! She 
told us about a little boy of seven who at intervals, takes 
a lock of hair from his pocket and kisses it enthusiastic- 
ally. It is from the head of his "sweetheart" to whom he 
writes impassioned missives, which the child recipient 
shows with pride. One of the frequent excuses for not 
studying in the evening is: "Oh, 1 went to the movies last 
night!" And at the question: "How often do you go?" she 

was answered: "Ever) night." 

* * * 

—The fudge of the Federal Court has filed an objection 
to bond brokers working in the Federal Building, and has 

ordered their removal. He has also given orders that bonds 
shall not be accepted except during business hours. This 
is certainly a "Pooh-Bah" ruling, for when a person is ar- 
retted after business hours, and not allowed to furnish 
bonds, he is going to spend the night in jail. This judge 
should re-consider his decision, for a man is supposed to 
he innocent until he is proven guilty, and making it im- 
possible to give bonds except during specified hours, seems 

un-American, to sa\ the least. 

* * * 

— There is an old scare crow of a creature who boards 
the Hyde St. cars about the time when business men and 
women are on their way to work. The ordinary business per- 
son is well-groomed, clean and sweet smelling, as a rule. 
especially in the case of the feminine gender, and to be 
jht into contact with a human of this sort is nauseating. 
man is so old that he must have escaped from King 
Tut's tomb, and so filthy that one can imagine him picked 
from the city dumps. Is there no place for relics of this kind? 
There should be some institution where he could be well 
sterilized and put into decent clothes. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 9, 1924 




ness has gone out of the mountains. But when it does come 
and as long- as it lasts it has a haunting beauty which can 
be found nowhere else and which makes the Valley uniquely 
charming. 



It is to be feared that the statement 
Lloyd George Sulky made to the press in the Sunday edi- 
tions by Ex-Premier Lloyd George 
will not add to his fame. When he undertook the work of 
supplying weekly articles to an American newspaper syndi- 
cate he should have recognized that he was placing himself 
on record before an enormous body of people who. having 
no sentimental attachments for him, would be apt to view 
his writing in a detached and rational way and thus arrive 
at -a fairly correct estimate of his character. Now if there 
is one thing that the American loves better than another 
it is a good loser. We have been accused of playing only 
winners and having but little sympathy with the defeated. 
But such- is not the case; a good loser is well estimated 
by us. if only for the certainty that a good loser is, in the 
very essence of things, no loser at all. Now Lloyd (ieovge 
is not losing well. He is carping at his successor and hint- 
ing that even if he does put through the reparations meet- 
ing, it will be no victory at all. This is not correct. No one 
can accuse this paper of any sympathy politically or other- 
wise with Ramsay MacDonald but we speak what is well 
known, when we say that if MacDonald does put this 
through it will be a great triumph and will show success 
where Lloyd George and Poincare fell down. To have the 
French satisfactorily out of the Ruhr and to start business 
up again in Germany would be a wonderful achievement 
in this, the sixth year of a futile peace. Mind you, we do 
not say that the thing will work out; we make no promises 
that Germany will toe the mark for long or that the Dawes 
plan will work out satisfactorily. But if this reparation plan 
goes through there will be a big boom here and everywhere 
else, for money will be turned out in large quantities and 
speculation will again be busy. No, it is not all pudding, 
but, such as it is, the credit is MacDonald's. 



Have you ever noticed the Santa Clara 
Santa Clara Hills Hills at this time of the year? There is 

no other sight in the world for delicate 
beauty that will compare with that particularly late in the 
afternoon. Then you see a line of hills. 30 miles of them, all 
of the most delicate shades of pastel. Many a country of the 
world have we seen and mountain scenery of surpassing 
beauty have we known but our memory holds nothing that 
will compare with the beauty of that sight, particularly from 
Saratoga or Los Gatos. If once the fame of it were spread 
abroad we should have artists by the hundreds and lovers 
of rural beauty by the thousands pouring in to get a glimpse 
of that which cannot be seen elsewhere. The dryness 
bleaches out the grass and even the trees so that all strik- 
ing color is lost and blended in a great harmony of tints. 
In all probability, fog. drifting over the edge of the valley 
and being almost immediately devoured by the hot sun. 
may have something to do with the peculiarly lovely effect 
by tempering down the atmosphere until it also loses the 
intensity of the glaring sunshine and blends with the color- 
ing of the hills. At all events the effect produced is very 
much the same as one gets sometimes in the old Italian 
frescoes. There is the famous one for example of St. Fran- 
cis preaching to the birds by Giotto. Last week in Los 
Gatos there was a blue sky, the almost exact counterpart 
of that of Giotto in that picture, and the hills had the 
faded delicate appearance which the fresco itself has ac- 
quired by age. It only comes about this time of the year 
when the sun of summer has done its work and the vivid- 



All sorts of qualifications for rul- 
The Rule of the Active ing have been mentioned at one 

time or another as distinguishing 
marks of the ruler. ( Ine says that rule belongs to the pow- 
erful ; another deprecates that statement and says that rule 
should be the prerogative of the ethical. So we get much 
controversy and even lighting, as to the relative merits of 
Nietzachism and Christianity. In a democracy such as ours 
it would appear as if the active were the rulers. It would 
seem from the returns that less than one-third of the electo- 
rate in this state take the trouble to vote; one-third of that 
portion of the voters which takes the trouble to register. 
The effect is seen in the result of the last gubernatorial elec- 
tion where Governor Richardson had 576.445 votes or 955,- 
039 \otes less than the numbered registered and so of 
course not at all a majority. Now, the nice people are 
greatly wrought up over this and say that there is a con- 
tradiction between our institutions and the fact. We be- 
lieve in government by a majority and we are getting gov- 
ernment by a minority. That is not quite correct. We are 
getting government by a majority of the active citizens, 
because only those who take the trouble to vote or reg- 
ister are active citizens. If we had a constitution which 
classified citizens into "active" and "passive" and which 
gave the vote to the former and not to the latter we should 
be attacked, as denying certain fundamental rights to cer- 
tain classes of people. But nature or something else is ftO 
democrat, since, given free play, the elements who for their 
indifference would be eliminated by a clever despot, elimi- 
nate themselves. Such is the case where large num- 
bers do not register. It is obvious that if they do not reg- 
ister and vote it is because they are not fit to register and 
vote. They have not the necessary activity and zeal to in- 
terest themselves in public affairs, they therefore exclude 
themselves from public affairs and actually confer a favor 
on the rest of us. \Ye see nothing to complain of. 



Every business man, who had had any 
At Minimum Cost experience at all, knows that it costs less 

to run the same number of cars under 
one management than it does to run these cars under two 
managements. That is exactly the case to consider now 
as to the merging of the Market Street system with the 
municipal street railway. It is not believed there arc two 
opinions on this subject. That is why the merging was 
made possible. 

It is absolutely necessary that the Municipal system lie 
made to pay, in the same way that a private corporation. 
such as the Market Street Railway, pays. The people have 
decided this matter and the merger is to be and it is only 
held up by the lack of action by the Municipal authorities. 
We are all interested in making the Municipal lines pay. 
That is what we all want to see and about the quickest 
way to see that accomplished is to make the merger >>t 
the roads. 



Evidence Clears Ferry President 
Evidence brought out in the hearing of the affairs of 
the Golden Gate Ferry Company being conducted in Su- 
perior Judge Walter I'. Johnson's court, effectively cleared 
Avon P. Hanford, president of the company, of reports that 
he had purchased supplies and later resold them to the 
company at great profit. 

It was asserted that James Robertson, shipbuilder, ha 1 
purchased the supplies in question and that Hanford knew 
nothing of the transaction. 



ugust ''. 192-1 



AND C \ 1 .1 1< )RN1 \ ADVERTISER 




TOWNMLCRIER 



) WHO THE DEVIL ART THOU 

"ONE THAT WILL PLAY THE 
f pEVIL, SIR WITH VOW 

Shakspeare, 



— Mrs. Pettus, sister of Mrs. Evans, who was killed In 
[exicans, lives here and has suffered a great deal of anx- 
t\ for months, ever since her fighting sister determined 
i hold her ranch in spite of the governmental decrees which 
:stored it to the pueblo as communal land. Some fighter 
as Mrs. Evans, but it must be confessed that it was an 
advised tight. The hardest fight to maintain is that of 
landowner who occupies land against the will of his 
eighbors. The whole Irish agrarian land agitation proves 
lat point. In the meantime, through Mrs. Pettus. we in 
an Francisco are interested in the outcome. In fact, we 
;em to have very universal interests these days. 

* * * 

— Our mixed-up society is the cause of all sorts of com- 
lications. There are echoes even today of the troubles 
lat arose at the time of the visit of the British fleet over 
icial questions. There was much criticism on the matter 
f the Hindus visiting the fleet, there were other bothers 

mnected with the colored people and the ball, for there 

ere some colored men on the British fleet. It is too bad 
lat such elementary matters should make so much trou- 
le. The Shah of Persia and the Crown Prince of Abys- 

nia, who are not exactly white, seem to get on finely 

ith the British court. 

* * * 

—The convention fever has hold of our people. Thus 
e read in one column that Fire Chief Thomas R. Murphy 

off to a fire convention at Pasadena, and that Rabbi Her- 
man Lissauer is just returning from a convention of the 
ionist Organization. It is only yesterday that the Chief 
E Police w : as at a convention, the Archbishop is at Rome. 
resumably on the ecclesiastical version of a convention, 
nd in fact everybody who is anybody is up to the neck 
i conventions of' some sort or other. What is the low down 

11 this convention game? 

* * * 

— Prohibition has brought into social life a sort of nasty 
loopiness even in San Francisco, and yet we are clearer 
f it than in other places. Most of the restrictive legis- 
tion has led to nasty results. 1 have heard of grown men 
tting at their windows in the dark watching young men 
id women at night and getting a pious joy out oi it. Just 
us sort of people are enthusiastic for the repression of 
ther folks, and it is from them that we get our prohibition 
ws and other enactments of the blue variety. 

* * * 

—All the old cranks in town that have been trying their 
mds at wild cat politics ever since the nineties are tak- 
ig luart of grace and walking out into the sunshine again. 
irowing out their chests and making imaginary speeches 
i they tread Market Street. Their names appear in the 
ress notices, the) are already secretaries and the like, 
ome of the candidates have brought more old mummies 
at of their coffins than have ever appeared outside of the 

ax works. 

* * * 

—We have a lady here from New York, a Mrs. Anne 
ennedv. who has "come on a birth control campaign m 
lis community. That is rather like carrying coals to New- 
istle as we are conspicuous in this state tor small families. 
>ur married group has a small proportion of children, per- 
aps the smallest anywhere; certainly the smallest in this 
itintry and so we cannot well see the advantage of the 
rival of Mrs. Keniu.h 



— Every year brings to this city a number of young 
bobbed haired hikers who have made then- way chiefly by 
the use of other people's automobiles from Xew York. Lots 

of them found jobs here, and some .if them even marry 
and settle down here. The news of their conjugal Felicity 
Spreading, induces others and so the stream i.s perpetual. 
The young things leave home and start off' with a khaki 
knickerbocker suit and very little else. That is pluck, but 
what about the people at home and their anxious suffer- 
ing? Any way, it is a queer revival of the argonauts! 

* * * 

— A nineteen year old Oakland boy is put into the de- 
tention home because he wants to go east and marry a 
teacher who seems to be about his own age. The family 
objects; families often do. But it seems to be a funny use 
to put the detention home to! The boy could not have been 
worse handled if he had contemplated a violation of the 
Mann act or something of that sort. It seems to me that 
well to do people can put nearly anybody they don't ap- 
prove of out of the way. 

* * * 

— A funny case came up before Judge Partridge the other 
day. It was a libel action brought against the Union In- 
surance Company of Canton, China, for insurance on a 
quantity of rice which was destroyed while being unloaded 
from lighters at Santiago. If it had been injured by rain 
alone, the court held that it would not have come under 
the head of a sea hazard, but the fact that the rain would 
not have done the damage if it had not been for the wind, 
did render it a sea hazard. Of course the question natur- 
ally arises if wind is essentially a sea hazard. 

* * * 

— If you were mayor, what would you do about the 
I fetch Hetchy muddle? It would be hard to say, for there 
seems to be a very bad impasse, but there must be a way 
out satisfactory to the city. In the meantime it is cruel and 
unjustified to hurl accusation against the city engineer. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 9, 1924 



The Girl He Never Met 



By Philip Van Doren Stern 5 



TV 1GHT had come with the rain, and in spite of the 
J_ l street lights mirrored on the gleaming surfaces of the 
pavements, darkness lurked everywhere and overhead the 
black pall of the sky stretched across the roofs. Far above 
them an office building rose, its sides speckled with scat- 
tered lights; on its tower a golden beacon burned. 

Standing beside the doorway of this building from which 
a thin stream of people trickled out to join the crowd on 
the sidewalks, a man waited, watching the moving mass of 
figures. They passed by, a sea of faces without individuality 
or meaning. And then, from all those faces, one face stood 
nut with the stabbing force of familiarity. 

A girl came to him and laid her hand lightly on his arm. 
There was a queer little smile mi her face and very dear 
she seemed to him as she stood there in the rain and the 
darkness. 

"I hear you're going to get married. Dick." she said 
softly. 

He answered her without surprise, as though he had ex- 
pected her to come to him there knowing his inmost 
thoughts and intentions. "Yes," he said, "tomorrow. I am 
waiting for her now. Soon she will be here and then we 
shall take dinner together at .Shanley's." 

She looked up at him silently. How pretty she was! Her 
hair now — what color was it? Blonde, he decided, of a 
golden hue. And her eyes, were they blue or grey? Blue, 
sea-blue, he told himself, and so of course they were. 

She spoke to him questioningly. 

"Are you sorry, dear?" 

"Sorrv dear heart? What use? How could it have been 
otherwise? We can't arrange these matters as we should 
like to. Oh. it's not my fault, nor yours, nor anybody's," 
he cried. "These things never happen the way they should, 
so we must make the best of it and do what we can." 

"I suppose so." she agreed sadly. "And now I shall never 
see you again, shall I?" 

He looked at her for a long while and then answered 
slowly, "No, but I shall never forget you. 1 could never 
do that." 

"But you will," she assured him. "My image will blend 
into hers until some day you will think that I bad brown 
hair as she has, and that " 

"No," he protested. "How could 1 do that? You air nol 
at all alike." 

"Perhaps not. but you will forget just the same." 

"No," be >aid determinedly. "1 won't." 

"But you will." she insisted gently. "That's the way it 
goes. I know." 

They stood looking at each other in silence. Their lit- 
tle moment was going fast; soon it would be ended. 

"Anyway I hope she'll take care of you as 1 would have," 
she said at last in a tender voice. "And love you as I would 
have." 

He gripped her two arms fiercely as though to keep' her 
with him always. 

"Why must it be? Why?" 

But she whispered quickly, "I must go now. I must go." 

"May I kiss you?" he asked. "Just this once?" 

"Yes, but quickly, quickly. She is coming." 

He kissed her and then she was gone, with a brave smile 
over her shoulder as she melted into the crowd and was 
lost. Then he heard a woman's voice beside him. 

"Have you been waiting long. Dick?" 

He turned to face his fiancee, unable, almost, to realize 



that she could not have seen him kiss this other girl fare- 
well as she passed into the land of vanished dreams. But 
he said quietly enough. "No, Lois, not long." 

And then he ceased to think for a while of the other girl 
who, of course, had never really existed at all. Already her 
face was fading from his mind and the memory of her 
paled beside the firm reality of the woman at his side. So 
talking amiably with his bride-to-be. he proceeded se- 
dately along the street to dine at Shanley's just as he had 
planned. 



HOTEL 

St. FRANCIS 

Dancing During Tea 

Monday Four to Six 

Rooms for Mah Jongg and Bridge Parties on Reservation 

Without Charge 

Management Thos. J. Coleman 



+ 



A Weekly Excursion into the Realm of Learning 

The advantages ot 

®tje (Enra 2L JfiUtams Jttaiitttte 

are now open to a limited number of San Francisco, 
Oakland and Alameda families. New dormitory system, 
carefully supervised. Pupils leave home Monday morn- 
ing and return Friday afternoon. 

From Fourth Grade. Accredited to the University of 
California. See representative at Children's Book Shop, 
474 Sutter Street, San Francisco, hours, 2 to 4 p. m. 
daily. 



+ 

* 



Exceptional Summer Sale 
of Attractive Lamps 

Electric table lamps for the living room — bed room 

— library 

Extremely low prices — and a free flash light with 

every purchase 

HETTY BROS. 

372 Ellis Street Prospect 333 



PALACE AUTO LAUNDRY 






Cars Washed and Polished 

While You Wait, Neiv Process. Cars Called For and Delivered 

Without Additional Charge 

Simonizing U Flushing Top Dressing 

Super Glossing Greasing Crank Case Flushing 

Alemite Service 

Phone Graystone 970 
1430 Bush Street 



John Eversman, Manager 



August 9, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




By ANTISTHENES 
O'Dowd on Progressive and Reactionary 
**fY DOWD > an ' <?id iver ye see so much in the papers 
\_/ about rayactionary an' pregrissive? They're full 
av it. an' begorra if Oi know phwhat it's all about."" 

"O'Kane, an' it'd take a shmarter man thin ye to figger 
the difference bethune the two. ar aven phwhat ayther av 
thim is." 

"An' d'ye know phwhat is the difference bethune the two 
O'Dowd ?" 

"Oi do, O'Kane, an' Oi'll till ye. It all comes av a lack 
av a battle-cry fur the polyticians. 'Raymimber the Maine', 
'Make the wurrld safe fur Democricy', 'Give until it hurrts\ 
'The Rape av Belgium', 'Down wid the Hun' an' 'Sixteen 
to Wan' — all av thim enough to make the rid blood av a 
man tingle— arre worn out, so the only way lift to ketch 
the wotes is to sthart somethin' new, an', John, here ye 
have it: Pregrissive an' Rayactionary." 

''But, will the payple know wan f'rum the other, O'Dowd, 
so's they'll know phwhat to wote fur, ar agin?" 

"They'll not, O'Kane, but the polyticians will go the 
lingth an' bridth av the land shoutin' they're pregressives 
and tellin' the woters to watch out fur the other divils 
who're not, an' the rayactionaries will do the same thing, 
only sayin' they're the wans who will save the counthry." 

"But, O'Dowd, how'll Oi know which is roight and which 
not?" 

"Ye don't have to know, O'Kane, fur there's nothin' to 
know, fur nayther av the candidates is goin' to be wan ar 
the other av thim whin they git elicted." 

"Thin, O'Dowd, whoy do they call thimsilves by these 
toitles?" 

"Well, O'Kane, a rayactionary calls himself that only 
because he figures he'll be gettin' more wotes if he prom- 
ises to go away back beyant the prisint ways, an' a pre- 
grissive thinks he'll git more by sayin' he'll thry a new 
way." 

"An' will the woters lie drawn into votin' wan way ar 
the other because av the polyticians sayin' this thing an' 
that, O'Dowd, an' both av thim intindiu' to do as they 
dom plaze if elicted?" 

"They will that. O'Kane. fur that's the way the suvrin 
payple does; they're always lookin' fur a change, an' love 
to take a chanct. list as Higgins wanst sid : 'It'll always 
be human nature to want to thrade the birrd in the hand 
fur the two in the bush.' It all remoinds me av phwhat hap- 
pened back in Kerry whin Oi wuz a lad. Me farther had 
an ass phwhat he bought at the fair at Ballenishlow, an' 
a more contrarry baste ye niver sit eyes on. O'Kane. He 
put him in the clover field which wuz foine enough aytin' 
fur inny baste, but the divil broke through the hedge to 
ate in the barren meadow beyont. So. the nixt day he put 
him in the meadow wid divil a thing but brambles and 
turf in it. an' bedad. if the ould buck didn't break through 
the hedge to git back at the clover. An' iverv other da\ 
if it weren't the same thing till he sold the obstinate divil 
to a man in Dingle." 

"An 1 phwhat's that to do wid wotin', O'Dowd?" 

"It's the same wid the woters. O'Kane; they'll thry inv- 
thing so long as it's different, an' niver sthop t * > figger if 
it's better or as good as phwhat they're lavvin'." 
* * * 

Or, Are We Willing Dupes? 

lie receives two hundred and fifty dollars a day from the 
Loeb and Nathan families to save the sons of these wealthy 



men from the noose. Hut we opine the millionaire fathers 
of the murderers could do better— might have procured some 
more circumspect alienist possessive of a degree of artistry, 
at least, in his method of "deduction" or his sophistry— 
one who would not provoke, clumsily, American readers' 
resentment against him for his attempt to insult intelli- 
gence. Doctor William A. White is not even a clever liar. 
\\ e have perused the "findings" of some clever men whose 
glib phrases and use of circumlocution have all but com- 
pelled to accept as reasonable their masterful concoction of 
handily woven prevarications, and we admired them for the 
audacity of the attempt; Dr. White's palpable effort, even 
when embellished by newspaper correspondents whom we 
have the charity to class as simply shallow, (fervently hop- 
ing they are not prostituting avocation as the doctor is) 
has none of the redeeming, even false, logic of the clever 
distorter of truth; his is crude. 

In his description of the early lives of the two youthful 
fiends, whom he sycophantly alludes to as "Babe" and 
"Dicky," he evolves naught that cannot be predicated of 
most American youths. The average boy has had similar 
emotions, even though he may not have been as brilliant — 
or wealthy — as the two Chicago murderers. However, we 
are not concerned with the physician's bald effort to earn 
his blood money, although the majority of his fellows in 
the medical profession, we hope, would not stoop to his 
method of acquiring fame and wealth ; we do take umbrage 
at his brazen attempt, in such amateurish fashion, to put 
a discount on American intelligence. 

Coupling what has been revealed in the Chicago court, 
with the unspeakable evidence not released to the news- 
papers, the case is a simple one. Two brainy young men 
hope to recoup gambling losses with $10,000 'come of a 
reward they expect to get as the aftermath of a kidnapping 
venture. Both degenerates, they incidentally propose to 
young Frank that he submit to their indignities; he strug- 
gles against their indecent advances, he recognizes them ; 
they fear the disgrace of exposure, kill the child and con- 
ceal his little body. Just a plain case of ordinary first-degree 
murder, so, why all this ensuing rot and delay? Gold. 
* * * 
Caste 

A notorious woman in the east is now getting rid of her 
fifth mate, a prince, and the incident gives rise to an im- 
pelling query : Why is there caste in prostitution and the 
line of demarkation set by statute? The woman of the 
street is without the pale, but her sister, who admittedly 
"marries" for adventure, money or notoriety, is not sub- 
ject in her chosen avocation to molestation by officers of 
the law! Her status is legalized by the law of the land 
which recognizes cohabitation licit, provided there is paid 
a fee for a license for each repetition of entry into the "mar- 
ital" state. This woman's livelihood or fame is acquired 
in this fashion, but her pickings are advantageously accu- 
mulated, so when cohabitation ceases by divorce, she has 
garnered ample means to carry her till her next venture. 

Her sister of the common street variety, however, has 
the privilege of "ascending" to her caste; it is all a matter 
of opportunity, but no sentiment should operate to discount 
the latter simply because this opportunity is not presented. 
Basically and vocationally the duo are akin. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 9, 1924 



Wheat and Chaff 




By Nathaniel Anderson 

I\* this case, the boy within whose reach was a 22 calibre 
target rifle did not have to get hold of it surreptitious- 
ly, because it was his very own, a plaything, and as it hap- 
pens, so far as we know, he did not even injure himself 
with it. but disaster came to the family of Mr. and Mrs, 
David Lutz of San Jose. Their daughter, pretty Ina Sarah 
Lutz. twenty-one years old, committed suicide with the 
rifle. 

Here is another danger that involves wrong supervision 
on the part of grown-ups. somewhat different from that 
where they leave lire arms about to the danger of child- 
ren. The young woman knew the awful potency of the 
little gun. but she was also imbued with the inordinate 
terror and shame of failing in her examinations, too much 
a factor in the schools. Unfortunately Ina Sarah did not 
fail to pass in the final tests at the Stale Teachers' College. 
A letter that came soon after her death brought this news. 
but Miss Lutz could not stand the strain and had shot 
herself. 

People of mature minds should realize that the brains of 
young students become over-taxed toward the end of the 
terms, when too fearful apprehension of successful ex- 
aminations crazes them beyond endurance. It is but nec- 
essarv to be able to read yourself to know that in this 
schools have something to handle not in the books. It's 
an old subject, with a record of deaths — suicide. Young 
scholars should be told that graduating is but one of the 
many games of life, and to play it witli sportsmanlike phil- 
osophy, or the examinations should be abolished. 

* * * 

— The Countess Morner mourns, and with cause, which is 
to sav that careless Peggy Joyce might pick a husband who 
does not as much as meet what is expected of him from a 
flippant "once-over." This bird, Count Morner. was no 
account, according to Peggy, though she was not so slangy 
as we. Xo more chasing the filthy lucre when he had 
Peggy of the husbands. He literally fired back his job with 
the Stomatol Tooth Paste Company; somebody else could 
talk up the properties of this particular cleansing proposi- 
tion for the teeth. He had no children to support; he had 
Peggy of the millions. To her he flew, anil nearly broke 
the I'ig arm-chair as he leaped into it. But it was filled 
with pins, and he bounced out again and ran howling to 
the newspapers ami divorce courts, for him. no more 
Peggy foyce; for her. she has changed her mind that the 
Count meets the easy requirements of a fifth husband. 

* * * 

— Belgium is in tears as the tenth anniversary of the war 
passes over its head. The spilt milk of the German inva- 
sion is something to cry over as late as today, despite the 
old proverb. It does not seem so long ago. either, when 
the trampling, cursing German army wrought destruction 
on Belgian territory. If, so far away from the scene, 
the fate of this country looms up quickly at the mention 
of it, we cannot wonder that a year is hut a day to the 
Belgians. 

Looking over into France, we remember the cries of hor- 
ror throughout this part of the world on hearing that 
wreckage as bad or worse was taking place deep into the 
frontiers of that country. These things should not lie for- 
gotten; the world would be silly to forget them. Ger- 
many was called monstrous, barbaric, but aside from all 
appellations and accusations that grow out of wars. Bel- 
gium and France have suffered. France, after the 1870 war. 
paid promptly to Germany an indemnity of $30,000,000. 
She was a loser then, hut now she and Belgium are on 



the side of the victors, and they are the two countries that, 
to put it mildly, had their sides crushed by the Teuton mili- 
tary institution. Rightly they want to be paid, and their 
payment will only, after all, lie a valuation of damage done. 
The full results of that damage will never be recompensed. 
That has been the moving reason for Poincare's stiff at- 
titude in the peace assemblies; and Herriot, it can be as- j 
sured, will ever have in view this reality. 

' — In governments, as well as other affairs, are different 
groups of people, who it can be said, assort themselves 
into nihl classes according to their constitutional make-up. 
These groups are in favor of this or that kind of ruling 
power, because emotionally they lean that way. Thev show 
inclinations they little dream they have; rather thev would 
not recognize their desires if others named them properly. 
If a president does a kingly act. notice how many adher- 
ents in the republic will praise it. Regard the upholders 
of the official who uses his authority like an arbitrary mon- 
arch, and listen to plaudits from certain people. 

few of us truly consider what is best for all, and by the 
same token. if monarchist,- did not want monarchies so much, 
it is not a wild venture to say that monarchies would be 
good enough; and looking at the matter keenly, the same 

thing can he said of the democrats. 

* * * 

— We hear a good story from Los Angeles. There was 
a store keeper down there who made it a point to pay as 
little of his debts as possible. Often the other dealers with 
whom he did business had to call on the sheriff to get their 
money. Finally they put a padlock on his door for good. 
It was a sort of a hobby with him not to paw The joke of 
the case is this: This merchant is the very fellow who 
first went after Arbuckle, the comedian of the pictures, 
when his personal affairs, involving great expense, made 
him short in payments on goods bought. It was this man 
of slow pay, or never pay, who by attaching Arbuckle's 
furniture, or other articles, brought upon the head of the 
funny man an avalanche of creditors. As in the case of the 

merchant, they put a lock on his house. 

* * * 

— Now what have we to say? Can the person whose 
attention we arrest give an answer, with confidence that 
he uncovers the secret of Albin ( )scar Stenroos' agility? 
Please to hold patience. There is no intention of propound- 
ing a puzzle without the items to tackle. Albin Stenroos 
is forty years of age, quite old for an athlete, but as a 
runner he still has speed and endurance; he is a champion, 
in fact; he finished first easily in the classic Olympic mara- 
thon, running the distance in 2 hours. 41 minutes and 
22 .■> 5 seconds, and it was his first long run in fifteen years. 
Stenroos is a Finn from Helsingfors, where he sells sewing- 
machines. Our answer is. that in this age of young men. it 
reallv makes no difference in the case of the wight who 
knows how to keep young. If there is a better answer, we 

should like to hear it. 

* * * 

— Speaking of democracies, the most radical, anarchistic 
citizens they have, are often the very down trodden from 
the old monarchies. At least much of our country's his- 
tory i> being made that way. The shop keepers from the 
nations that most despise them, are impudent and surly 
in America. 



I 



1 
I 



TRAINER -PARSONS OPTICAL CO. 

DISPENSING OPTICIANS 

1S6 GEARY STREET 

Near Stockton, Opp. City of Paris 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Kearny 27 67 



August 9, 1924 AND CALIFORNIA AI WF.RTISFR 9 




Tallant Tubbs 



By Eleanore F. Ross 



H 



Tallant Tubbs 



IS a big man, this young 
Tallant Tubbs, who is run- 
ning for State Senator on the Re- 
publican ticket, big physically ami 
spiritually. I am a tall woman my- 
self, but I had to look up several 
inches into his serious face, and felt 
for the time being, quite undersized 
and insignificant beside his six foot 
stature. 

I would say, first and foremost. 
that Tallant Tubbs is essentially a 
humanitarian ; that he is a man up- 
on whose sympathies the humanely 
inclined portion of the community 
can work; that he will weigh a 
question from the standpoint of 
bringing about the "greatest good 
to the greatest number" ; but that 
this standpoint will be taken on practical grounds as well 
as sentimental ; that he is entering the forum of politics 
unspoiled by the world as yet. and has a fresh and whole- 
some enthusiasm about him that will very probably en- 
dear him personally to the majority of his constituents; and 
that lastly, he is not going to represent any one class or 
interest. 

"What did he think was the most vital question at this 
time, in California?" I had asked when I first entered his 
office, high up in one of San Francisco's skyscrapers, 

"The most important thing for California or'for any other 
state now, and at all times, is to put men into office who 
can and will prove themselves independent of any interest, 
corporation or individual!" he answered emphatically; "and 
that will be the way I will work, should 1 be elected. That 
is not to say," he went on soberly, "that I will not take 
council and advice; on the contrary. Should a question 
come up regarding bankers. I will listen to what bankers 
have to say regarding it; if it is a question of -highways, 
1 will seek knowledge from men versed in highway build- 
ing, and so on down the line. But no man. organization or 
class will dictate my actions! 1 will be absolutely free of 
all strings!" 

"These are a few 
nounced, handing me 

1 That California promptly ratify the 
Amendment recently passed bj Congress. 

2— That there be adequate support of public education 
so that there will be an equal educational opportunity for 
even child in the state of California. 

3— That there be an increased appropriation for the Bu- 
reau of Child Hygiene under the Shepherd Towner Mater- 
nity and Infancy Ac so that there will be a sum suffii 
to make available the whole amount y<i the Federal ('.rant. 
namely $28,112 per annum. 

4 — That, as there is a great need for an industrial insti- 
tution where delinquent women can be rehabilitated, there 
should be the establishment of such an institution at a 
suitable place. . .. 

"That last subject is one that I am keenly interested in. 
Mr. Tubbs told me; "1 hear that since their home was 
taken from them, these women are occupying quarters in 
Hientin that should bold only about half their num- 
ber, and the fact that the\ are thrown among some ol 
the worst tvpes of criminals, is a crime in itself, rhese 
"delinquent women' are not criminals; they have not broken 



if the bills that I hcliev e 
a paper, and I reac' 



Child Labor 



any man-made laws; they are merely the unfortunates of 
the world, and should be treated as such, and given a new 
chance in life, not herded in jails. Is California too poor 
to afford a suitable place for these poor sisters of our's? 

"Perhaps my pledge would give you the best idea of 
what my intentions are." he concluded; "this is it," and he 
repeated the following as if it were not only a pledge, but 
a creed as well, to which he was dedicating his voting life : 

"I promise to devote my time at Sacramento to the in- 
terests of the Tax Payers of the State of California. City 
of San Francisco, 19th Senatorial .District, and to no other 
interests. 

1 believe that the future of successful Federal or State 
government lies in Independent Politics. By that I mean 
that we should elect men to hold office who have 
enough independence of mind and courage to make deci- 
sions for themselves. 

There are too many office holders who realize that their 
vote is on the wrong side, but who are forced to take the 
orders of corporations, big interests, or individuals. 

I am asking for support in the coming election because 
I sincerely feel that I can represent my District with credit. 

I shall want to hear the arguments for and against any 
subject of proposed legislation, and I shall want to listen 
to all who are interested. 

There will be no one from whom I must receive orders, 
and I shall decide only as my conscience dictates." 

Mr. Tubbs has been indorsed by the Republican Central 

Committee, the Associated War Veterans, Organized Labor 

and the Civic League of Improvements Club. 
* * * 

"Please do not write me up as some of the press has 
done. — stressing the fact that I am wealthy, and can there- 
fore afford to be independent. Too much has been said in 
that vein. I would be independent whether rich or poor." 

"Don't worry." said 1. as he opened the door and walked 
with me to the elevator; "I will write you up as 1 feel about 
you ; that is. as a man." 



The Crimes of Prohibition Officials 

More ami more criminally arbitrary become the prohibi- 
tion officials in their dealings with boot leggers. It is get- 
ting to be a case of "Commit a crime to catch a criminal," 
for these officers of the law commit crimes in their eager- 
ness to secure the wary moonshiner. Down at Del Monte 
when the recent raid was made upon this hotel. Erwin Col- 
lins, a Monterey country traffic policeman, "posed as an 
army officer to get evidence." 

It appears that the above act is within the pale of the 
law; that is to say, the motive involved in this particular 
case, justified the mean- of obtaining information against 
the law-breakers, although we were under the impression 
that anyone not in military service, who donned the uniform 
of an army officer ri>ked a prison term. However, should 
this masquerading continue, indiscriminately and indefi- 
nitely, it can surely only bring into contemptible disrepute 
a uniform which is now held in the deepest respect. 

— Walter I. Rock, incumbent, is running again on the 

Republican ticket, for Assembyman, 32nd district. If Rock's 

-t r'eci rd is any criterion of what his future administra- 

.v ill be, then the citizen who has the welfare of his 
p.lar district at heart, should cast his vote for Walter 
I. Rock. He is as firm and solid as his cognomen. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 9, 1924 






iriNANCIAV 

By P. N. Beringer 

HAVE you ever had it brought to your attention that 
the city which justly claims itself a convention place, 
is doing a great deal for those who live within its limits? 
San Francisco is one of the most active convention cities 
of the whole world. Let us see. then, what conventions do 
for a city and its citizens: 

Millions of dollars are spent in San Francisco each year 
by those who come here as delegates and as tourists. Just 
think of the money that is expended on auto camps, on re- 
sorts, with retail merchants, at hotels, for recreation and 
in restaurants. And all of these dollars, which the stranger 
has brought in, are again expended with the retail mer- 
chant, in the building trades and as to replacements, in 
cafes, in advertising, in taxes, and in labor. And this money 
may be classified finally in bank deposits. We cannot have 
too many conventions. On with the good work! 

* * # 

The P. G. and E. 

There are but few in the state understanding just what 
an immense factor for our welfare the Pacific Gas and 
Electric Company has become. The purveying of unlimited 
heat, light, and power is one of the most valuable assets 
a people may have at their command and these the com- 
pany furnishes without limitation. But it requires a gen- 
eralship in the management that is little short of wonder- 
ful to so control the manufacture of power to furnish all 
of the heat, light and power the people may demand or to 
furnish just the normal quota and not take into consid- 
eration the abnormal. We have had only an average of eight 
inches of rainfall this year and this is the eighth consecu- 
tive dry year. Naturally, the lack of water in our rivers 
has developed a lack of power, for those who depend on 

water flowing over their dams to create power and light. 

* * * 

Forethought 

And the people should know they have the men who 
are behind the Pacific Gas and Electric Company to thank 
for the plentiful supply of light and power, despite the 
water shortage. Foreseeing the possibility of water short- 
age a million dollars was expended in rushing the Sacra- 
mento steam plant to completion. This plant will supply 
the city of Sacramento with electricity and will not use 
any power derived from the hydro-electric producing cen- 
ters. Willi the same idea in mind every available plant, 
where electricity might be produced through steam, in the 
state, was either leased or bought and these plants are all 
of them working night and day to furnish you with power 

and light. 

* * * 

The Future 

I have not sufficient space to do justice in an article show- 
ing the magnitude of the job nor the comprehensiveness 
of the management. It may be said, however, that not only 
is the present need taken care of but the future is also 
assured by the acquirement of power plants, where the 
supply of water is not affected to such a great extent as 
to prevent production. The Pit River plant will supply 
power indefinitely and this job is now Hearing completion 
and there are also other sources from which the company 

will secure a never failing supply of power and light. 

* ♦ ♦ 

Municipal Ownership 

It seems to me that right here is the place and the time 
where I may ask those who are forever talking about the 



benefits of municipal ownership and operation of public 
utilities, if they ever heard of a plant, municipally owned, 
where the plant management was allowed the use of the 
faculty of foresight? 

Limited Water Supply 

Fortunately for all of us the limited water supply we 
have had has brought the discussion of the Hetch Hetchy 
nearer the basis on which it will have to be discussed in 
the future. And we may as well agree among ourselves 
that the power project has received its death blow. Some 
people think it simply has been deferred and that the prop- 
aganda for a municipal power producing plant will be re- 
vived as soon as it is possible for the city to obtain suffi- 
cient money by the sale of bonds to enter into the power 
producing business. It would be far better if this phase 
of the Hetch Hetchy situation were forgotten. Gradually 
the people will be given facts as to Hetch Hetchy which 
will astonish them. It is such a vast piece of work that 
this is inevitable and there is fast growing a community 
sentiment which will vehemently demand satisfaction as 
to information wanted from those who are enthusiastically 
in favor of everything that has been done as to the Fletch 
Hetchy supply of water for the city of San Francisco. 



— "I'm determined to get on," the young business man 
told his friend, "so I'm taking a course at a school of lan- 
guages.'' 

"And what language are you learning?" "Scotch." 



— The express from Montreal had just pulled in and the 
nervous, heavily laden passenger had accosted a porter. 

"Careful with these suitcases, young man," he warned. 

"Suh," replied the red-cap. "All's toted hundreds of dese, 
an' nevah once broke a single bottle." 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



OFFICES 

The Holbrook Building 



58 SUTTER STREET 

A Strictly First-Class Office Building 

Agent Room 411 



Municipal and Public Utility BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

Mills Building, San Francisco 
Phone — Douglas 2244 



THE HOME 

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NEW YORK 



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TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



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Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturer, of 
RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS. CULVERTS. FI.CMES, 
I'ENSTOI lis. GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS. ETC. 
San FranclBCO, Calif. Lo. Anrele., Calif. 

444 Market St. Sin Santa Fe Are. 



August 9, 1924 



AND CALIFORN'l \ ADVERTISER 



11 



Comments on Foreign Affairs 

IT IS the same old trick the Germans have plaved before 
and the French General Staff has insisted all of the 
time they woirid make use of again. Finally, General Fbch 
ordered his representatives in Berlin to come home, and. 
as far as the French are concerned, there will he no more 
representation in Berlin. France has continually, since a 
short time after the Armistice, held up a picture for all of 
the world to see that Germany was busy building up an 
army by every subterfuge she could use. "Finally the thing 
has become so apparent that there was no other course 
than for Foch to break off relations. It now remains to be 
seen what is going to be done. Is the British government 
going to take the stand that Germany is justified in what 
she has done and is doing? Is this country going to rest 
satisfied that all we have sacrificed in the Great War means 
nothing at all to us or the rest of the world? 

When General Foch signed the Armistice agreement and 
then threw away the pen with which the articles were 
signed he is reported to have said, "that is the worst thing 
I have ever done." He knew what the result would be be- 
cause he was a Frenchman, and no one knows the German 
character better than the French. He knew that from that 
time on it would be campaign of subterfuge and chicanery 
on the part of Germany and that the paying of reparations 
would be indefinitely delayed. He felt what everv other 
Frenchman felt and that was that Germanv would almost 
at once start on the rebuilding of its army. And all of this 
has come to pass. Now, the whole world will be called 
upon to watch just what Germany intends doing. It would 
not be surprising at all to see her plunge us all into another 
war. 



Mexico's Trade With Us 

We have jusl been reading a report on the business thai 
i- being done by merchants of this countr) with Me ico, 
and the volume, which is constantly increasing, is phenom 
enal. Mexico is buying iron and steel in very large quail 
titles and we stand at the head of the list from which iron 
and steel is being procured. We sell Mexico ten times more 
iron and steel than any other country. We sell that coun- 
try about every kind of manufactured article. We have 
asked the exporter from San Francisco to give his atten- 
tion to the' wants of Mexico and we have also said that it 
would pay the importer here to study what Mexico pro- 
duces to sell us as raw materials and also as finished prod- 
ucts. The states the other side of the Rocky mountains have 
not been slow in making that study. St. Louis, for instance, 
looms up big with its export to Mexico, via New Orleans. 



The Japanese Import Tax 

It is needless to say that Japan's import tax will hit us 
quite heavily, but it will also hit the makers of articles of 
luxury in all other countries as well. It is one means of 
reprisal adopted by the Japanese that is quite effective. We 
may as well recognize the fact that Japan will do every- 
thing that is legitimately in her power to make us regret 
our action as to the Japanese labor which may want to 
gain a foothold in this country. Some of the things that 
Japan may do will certainly hurt us and make us wince, at 
times. The Japanese people are looking at the question of 
placing the Japanese on a different basis from any other 
nationality, except the Chinese and some of the other Asi- 
atic and Pacific Island nationals, with the greatest possible 
disfavor. 




\xy§ 



Academy 

SAX LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 

For particulars address 

SISTER SUPERIOR 



Select Boarding and Day School 

under the direction of the Sisters 
of St. Dominic 



XOTlt'K TO CREDITOKS 
Estate of Paul Sodtnl, deceased 
No. 39421, Dept 9 
Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
w. .1. iiyiu's, administrator of the estate of 
Paul Sodlni, deceased, t" the creditors of and all 
persons having claims against the said decedent. 
CO file them With the necessary vouchers within 
four ( 1 > months after the first publication of 
this notice, in the office of the Clerk of the Su- 
perior Courl of Hi-' State of California, In and 
for the City and Count? of San Francisco, or to 
exhibit them with the necessary vouchers within 
Eour <41 months after the first publication of this 
notice to the said administrator, at his office, B69 
Phelan Building, San Francisco. California, 
which said last-named office the unders 

Selects as his place of business in all matters 
connected with said estate of Paul Sodlnl, 
ised. 

W .T, HTNES, 
Administrator of the Estate <•( Paul Sodinl, 
deceased 

D ted, Sun Franeisi mia, July 1 "., 1924 

Cullman & VI i 

Attorneys for Administrator. 




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12 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 9. 1924 




ooieTy 



S^3.'<^*k.jvyT : ?' 



in sy ct Pin 

MR AND MRS. E. P. DUNN have announced the marriage of 
their daughter, Miss Margaret Dunn, and Mr. Gustave A. 
Kamper of San Francisco and Honolulu, which was solemn- 
ized Thursday afternoon. July 31. in Santa Barbara. Mr. and 
Mrs Kamper are passing the first week of their honeymoon 
in this city. They will sail in a few clays for the Hawaiian 
Islands where Mr. Kamper will engage in business. 

MISS ELE\NOR SPRECKELS and Mr. Kenneth Walsh will lie 
married" on September 27. It has not been decided where 
the wedding will occur, in town or in Burlingame. Miss Clau- 
dine Spreckels will be her sister's maid of honor and the 
other attendants will be Miss Alice Moffitt. cousin of the 
bride- Miss Josephine and Miss Edith Grant; Miss Alice 
Retina, who will then be Mrs. Coy Filmer; Miss Edna Taylor, 
whose marriage to Mr. Bliss Rucker will occur on October 
IS and Miss Mary Julia Crocker, who lias just announced 
her engagement to Mr. Arthur Scully of Pittsburg. Mr. How- 
ard Spreckels will be the best man. The ushers will be Mr. 
William \ Magee Jr.. Mr. Cyril McNear, Mr. Leon Brooks 
Walker. Mr. George O'Connor, Mr. Herbert Tietzen and Mr. 

MISS° SAR4H CHRISTENSEN. daughter of Rev. and Mrs. 
Charles Christensen of Novato. and Mr. William Augustus 
Brewer Jr., son of Rev. and Mrs. William Augustus Brewer 
of Burlingame. were married last Saturday at the Presby- 
terian Church in Novato in the presence of relatives of the 
bridal couple and a number of intimate friends. Rev. Mr. 
Brewer and Rev. Mr. Christensen officiated at the marriage. 

MRS HENRY J CROCKER announced the engagement of her 
daughter. Miss Mary Julia Crocker, to Arthur Scully, son of 
Mr and Mrs. Henrv Scully of Pittsburg, Pa. The news was 
imparted to the friends of the engaged couple through notes 
last Friday. Mr. Scully arrived from the East Friday night. 
Miss Crocker, who is an exceptionally pretty girl of a vivac- 
ious charming disposition, returned several weeks ago from 
abroad having been around the world with her mother and 
her sister Miss Marion Crocker. Miss Mary Julia Crocker is 
a granddaughter of the later Clark W. Crocker of Sacra- 
mento and a daughter of the late Henry J. Crocker. On her 
mother's side. Miss Crocker is related to the Ives family, also 
pioneers, who lived near Jackson. California. Mr. Scully is a 
practicing lawyer of Pittsburg, a graduate of Harvard Uni- 
versity Law School and a member of the firm of Burgwin. 
Scully and Burgwin. 

LUNCHEONS 

MISS ALICE REQUA and Mr. Coy Filmer. whose marriage is 
set for August 12. and Miss Mary Julia Crocker and Mr. 
Arthur Scullv. who will wed in the autumn, will share honors 
at two affairs on Saturday. Miss Elizabeth Magee will en- 
tertain at a luncheon for the two engaged couples at her 
home in Fruitvale. and Miss Jessie Knowles will give a din- 
ner for them at her home in Berkeley. 

MISS EDNA TAYLOR, who will wed Mr. Bliss Rucker on Oc- 
tober IS, was the honored guest of her cousin. Mrs. Cheever 
Cowdin of New York, at a large luncheon Wednesday after- 
noon. The party was held at the Hotel St. Francis and was 
enjoyed by a group of the honor guest's close friends. 

MRS. HENRY KIERSTED had a few friends at an informal 
luncheon Tuesday in compliment to Mrs. J. Cheever Cowdin of 
New York. 

MRS. GEORGE WEST was hostess Tuesday afternoon at a 
luncheon party at her home in Sausalito. the affair being in 
honor of Mrs. Aldrich Barton, who is home from Shanghai 
visiting her parents and other relatives. Mr. and Mrs. Bar- 
ton will return sometime this month. 

MR. AND MRS. HORACE HILL were hosts to Mrs. J. Cheever 
Cowdin of New York at a picnic in the Los Altos hills, hav- 
ing one of those well-managed, perfect al fresco repasts for 
which they are famous. The picnic grounds are equipped 
with all sorts of devices to aid in making a menu a success. 



MRS. DIXWELL HEWITT gave a luncheon a few days ago for 
Mrs. Stow Fithian, Mrs. Chas. Hervey Jackson and Miss Jessie 
McElroy, who stopped here for a few days en route from 
Santa Barbara for Alaska. 

ST. FRANCIS 
MRS. ROBERT HAYS SMITH entertained at luncheon Monday 
at the St. Francis, Among her guests were Mrs. Charles R. 
McCormick, Mrs. Alexander Hamilton, Mrs. James Jackman, 
Mrs. Harry Scott, Mrs. Ethel Hager and Mrs. Joseph Oliver 
Tobin. 
MRS. GEORGE MARYE and Miss Cecilia O'Connor. Mrs. F. Mc- 
Near and Mrs. L. McMullen, Mrs. H. M. A. Miller and Mrs. 
Charles Yirden. Miss Mary Julia Crocker and Miss Aileen 
Mcintosh, Mrs. E. J. Pond and the Misses Marietta and Kath- 
erine Kuhn were among the smaller groups at luncheon. 
MRS. R. P. SCHERWIN had as her guests Mrs. R. Dunn, Mrs. 
George de Latour, Mrs. Harry Hill, and Mrs. George Rob- 
bins. 

TEAS 
MRS. MANFRED L. HEYNEMANN will give a garden fete on 
August 12 by way of a welcome to her daughter-in-law, Mrs. 
James L. Heynemann. whose visit here is being made much 
of by her artist friends. The Lehvinne-Heynemann marriage 
took place over a year aeo in New York. Mrs. Heynemann 
Jr. was Mrs. Estelle Gray Lehvinne. wife of the noted pianist. 
Joserh Lehvinne. and herself a violinist of international note. 
She is one of the prominent concert violinists known to music 
lovers in Europe and America. She is a California girl, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Gray of Alameda. 
MRS. DUDLEY PETERSON of New York, who is at San Rafael 
for a few days visiting her sister-in-law, Mrs. Harry Disbrow 
Johnson, was the figure of interest at an attractive tea Mon- 
day given by Mrs. Johnson when fifty or more of the Marin 
county friends of the hostess called to meet the visitor. Re- 
ceiving with Mrs. Johnson was a group that included Miss 
Charlotte Zeil. Miss Lichtenberg and Mrs. Peterson. 
MISS HELEN CROCKER is in New York visiting with her rela- ' 
tives there after a sojourn of several months in London and 
Paris. She is expected home shortly. 
MRS. W. S. GRAY gave a large tea on Sunday afternoon in 
honor of her daughter. Mrs. James L. Heynemann and Mr. 
Heynemann. who are here from New York. 

isriih;e 

AIRS. M. E. HOPKINS gave a bridge affair at San Rafael on 
Friday for Miss Margaret Babcock. a summer visitor in Marin 
countv. 

DINNERS 

MR. AND MRS. ERNEST FOLGER will celebrate the twenty- 
seventh anniversary of their marriage next Monday evening 
when they will entertain at a dinner at their home in Bu- 
chanan street. 

MISS MARY EMMA FLOOD gave a large dinner in "Linden 
Towers.'' the James Flood home in Menlo Park, Friday eve- 
ning, at which Miss Alary Julia Crocker and Mr. Arthur 
Scully were honored guests. This was the first large affair 
at which the young hostess entertained since her return from 
Europe last month. 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES K. McINTOSH entertained in honor 
of Miss Crocker and Mr. Scully at a dinner, the affair being 
held at the Mcintosh home in Washington street, on Tuesday 
evening. 

MISS JESSIE KNOWLES was hostess at a dinner and dance in 
honor of Miss Alice Req.ua and Coy Filmer. 

MRS. THOMAS DKISCOLL. who is passing the summer with 
her mother. Mrs. A. W. Bacon, in Santa Barbara, will en- 
tertain her friends at a Spanish dinner dance party at the 
Montecito Country Club on August 16. 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE T. MARYE were hosts Tuesday at a 
dinner party at their home in Burlingame. having about ten 
guests. 

COMMANDER and Mrs. Harold Darlington Jones, recently ar- 
rived from island duty in Samoa, at the Naval Training Sta- 
tion at Yerba Buena, entertained at dinner Monday evening 
for Captain and Mrs. George B. Landenberger, who will leave 
California later in the month. 

MRS. ALFRED DE ROPP JR. and her brother, Mr. Evans Pills- 
bury, were joint hosts at a dinner Saturday in the Montecito 
Country Club. The guests of honor were Mr. and Mrs. Ash- 
field Stow, who are house guests of the young matron. After 
the dinner the party repaired to the La Cumbre Country Club 
for a dance. 



JOSEPH E. RUCKER, JR. 

Specializing in the sale of San Francisco Realty Investments 

since 1911. — Your inquiry solicited should you desire to buy 
or sell. Mortgage loans negotiated. 

71(1-11-12 Alexander Building — Douglas S24 

Member San Francisco Real Estate Board 



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COLONIAL HOTEL 

6~,u Itusli Street, Ketween Powell and Stockton, Sun FrancUco 
Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



I 



August 9, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



DANCES 

MISS BLLEN1TA RAWLINGS of Piedmont and Miss Virginia 
Morill of New York, who have been visiting in Pasadena i 
Mrs. Howard Huntington and Miss Edith Huntington, were 
the guests of honor at a dance given at the Huntington home 

last week. Miss Rawlings and Miss Morill will leave in the 
fall for Vassar to resume their studies and Miss Huntington 
Will go to Washington, where she will enter Mount Vernon 
Seminary. 

IX TOWN' AM) OUT 

MRS. COWDIN left for Lake Tahoe Thursday, where she will 
visit for several weeks before returning to her home in the 
East. 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK AMES, Miss Gloria and Egbert Ames 
and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph M'errill and their two children are 
home from a motor tour of the Northwest, covering interest- 
ing places in Oregon and Washington. 

MR. AND MRS. JEROME POLITZER leave this week for Santa 
Barbara and will be at El Mirasol for the remainder of this 
month. 

MRS. ROBERT McMILLAN (Leontine Blakeman) is here from 
the East and is renewing acquaintance with her San Fran- 
cisco fiiends, as she is still in mourning for her father, who 
passed away here last year, Mrs. McMillan is not accepting 
the invitations that always make her visits so eventful. Mrs. 
McMillan is making the Woman's Athletic Club her home 
while here. 

MISS GERTRUDE MURPHY returned to the city Thursday. 
Her parents, Mr. and M|rs. Eugene Murphy, who have been 
visiting with friends at the lake, returned a few days ago. 

MR. AND MRS. HENRY POETT and Miss Evelyn Poett, who have 
been at Lake Tahoe for weeks, returned to their suburban 
home Thursday. 

MR. AND MRS. HENRY FOSTER DUTTON have returned from 
Webber Lake, where they spent several weeks, and are at 
the St. Francis. 

MR. M .H. de Y'OUNG has been at El Mirasol for several days, 
where he joined his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
Nion Tucker. 

MR. AND MRS. RALPH PALMER are at San Rafael again after 
a delightful motor trip to Lake Tahoe and a visit of a week 
or so at the Brockway Tahoe Club. 

MR. AND MRS. FREDERICK W. McNEAR and their sons, Fred- 
erick W. McNear Jr. and John Breeden, left Wednesday for 
Honolulu on the first lap of a tour of the world. Miss Marion 
Zeile accompanied them to Honolulu. 

MR. AND MRS. TEMPLETON CROCKER are back at their home 
in San Mateo. Mr. Crocker has been at the Bohemian Grove for 
a fortnight and during that time Mrs. Crocker spent a week 
with the George Newhalls at Lake Tahoe and a week with 
the George Popes, also at Tahoe. 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIS WALKER motored South a few days 
ago and were among the week-end guests at El Mirasol. 

MRS. EDWARD H. CLARK .1 R and her children have left Bur- 
lingame for a visit of a few weeks at the Tahoe-Brockway 
Club. 

DR. MILLICENT COSGRAVE left Monday for the Santa Cruz 
mountains to visit Dr. and Mrs. William E. Musgrove at their 
country place Cor 8 week. 

MR. AND MRS. RICHARD E. DOYLE have bought a lions.' in 
Jackson street, near Ootavia, and will take possession of it 
in the early autumn. The residence is in the same block as 
the home of Mrs. Doyle's aunt and uncle, Miss Mary Louise 
Phelan and Mr. James D. l'helan. 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT OXNARD have returned from Europe 
and are at their camp on the Feather River. They went di- 
rectly to the camp without coming to San Francisco. Mrs. 
Oxnard's niece. Mrs. Algernon Gibson, and her children are 
also at the camp. 

MR. AND MRS. A. BROWN, who have been at the Vendome in 
San Jose for the past few months, returned on Friday last 
and are again occupying their apartments at the Hotel Rich- 
elieu. 

MISS BARBARA BALLOU will leave this week on a trip to 
Santa Barbara and I os Ingeles she is planning later on to 
go to Honolulu for a visit, although she will be unable to 
he there for the wedding of Miss Kinau Wilder and Lieu- 
tenant Charles Butler McVay 8d, which will take plao oi 
August 30. Miss Wilder left last week for her home in 
Honolulu, after a visit of several weeks here at the Ballon 
residence. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 



Telephone Sutter 6130 



Under Management CARL s STANLEY 



nit. AND MRS Eitwix .ianss. i.os Angeles, and their children, 
spent Beveral days the past weeli a.1 Del Monte with tfrs 
William Cluff, San Francisco. 

MR AND .Mils JOSEPH M. HASTEN, win, were away for many 

weeks on a motor tour, have returned to their home in town. 

Their daughter. Miss Katherine Matsen, is visiting her broth- 
ers, Kendall and Stuart Masten, in New York. 
INTIMATIONS 

MR. AND MRS. FRITZ HENSHAW are having a house party at 

I'.en Lomond this week, and will entertain different gr s 

Of their friends throughout this month. 

MRS. FREDERICK W. SHARON, who is passing the summer 
at her home in Menlo Park, is recuperating from the indis- 
position that compelled her to take a rest cure in the coun- 
try. Mrs. Sharon has been in town at the Palace Hotel for 
several days. 

MR. ADDISON MIZNER and his niece, Miss Ysabel Chase, are 
making occasional visits to Burllngame from Pebble Beach, 
where they are living. Mr. Minzer is building a house at 
Pebble Beach for Miss Chase and after its completion will 
return to the East. 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE B. ROBBINS have decided to live in 
Burlingame throughout the year and have given up their 
apartment in town. They have been in the Cloman house in 
Burlingame all summer and will remain there during the 
w r inter. 

MR. AND MRS. LAWRENCE AUSTIN in New York are receiv- 
ing congratulations for the birth of a son on July 31. This 
is the fourth child in the family, the three others being daugh- 
ters. Mrs. Austin will be remembered as M,iss Roma Paxton 
of this city, 

MISS MARIE WELCH will leave Europe with her father, An- 
drew Welch, on August 23, to return home after an absence 
of many months spent in foreign travel. While in France she 
participated in the international tennis tournament in Monte 
Carlo and Nice. Mrs. Welch and Miss Florence Welch will 
remain abroad until October, reaching here toward the latter 
part of the month. 

MISS PATRICIA TOBIN had a two-tennis tournament at the 
courts near the home of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
O. Tobin, in San Mateo. Preceding the playing Monday, Miss 
Tobin entertained some of the participants at luncheon and 
all of them remained for tea. 

MR. AND MRS. BENJAMIN H. SMITH (Marion Regensburger I 
are being congratulated on the arrival of a daughter a few 
days ago. The child is to be named Mary Ellen, after her 
grandmother, M.ts. Martin Regensburger. 

MR. AND MRS. EVAN FISHER, to whom a son was born Sat- 
urday, July 26, are being congratulated. Mrs. Fisher was a 
bride of last year in Washington. She was formerly Miss 
Elizabeth Burnett, daughter of Mrs. Sidney Ballou of San 
Francisco and Washington. 

DEL MONTE 

MR. AND MRS. ROY CARRUTHERS of New York City, who are 
on their way home after several months abroad, stopped over 
at Del Monte for a few days. With them were Mr. and Mrs. 
Leonard Richards and Mrs. L. M. Boomer of New York, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Nel Schweitzer of San Francisco 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM HOUGHTELING are at Pebble Beach 
in the Chris Jorgenson house, which they will occupy for 
August and September. 

A LARGE PARTY' at the Sunday night dinner dance at Del 
Monte Lodge included: Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hunt. Mrs. G. 
Maurice Heckscher, Mrs. Julian Huff. Mr. and Mrs. S. F. B. 
Morse. Miss Ysabel Chase and Lt. Arthur Shreve. 

MISS LILY O'CONNOR and Mrs. Jennie Winston Castle of Los 
Angeles are enjoying a visit of several days at Del Monte 
Lodge. 

MR. AND MRS. EYRE PINCKARD and their children. Miss 
Dorothy and Master Eyre Pinckard Jr.. left Friday for Peb- 
ble Beach, where they will spend August and September. 
FEATHER RIVER INN 

FEATHER RIVER INN increases in popularity as the season 
advances. Among the recent arrivals are: Mr. and Airs. 
Latham Mc.Mullen. Mr. and Airs. Ceo. Lent. Miss Elizabeth 
Lent. Miss Virginia McMullen, Mrs. Marshall Hale. Mr. Ran- 
dolph Hale. Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Loupe and son. Miss E. Fleish- 
hacker, M. Pleishhacker, Mr. and Airs. Howard Brickell, Dr. 
C. W. Bib. a. Mrs. B. P. Anderson. San Rafael; Airs. T. G. 
Hint and daughters. Alameda: Elmyra Foss. Ross. Calif.: 
Miss M T. Mentzer. Ross. Calif.. Miss Sarah Coffin. Ross. Calif. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Van Neil At*., at Geary Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Is the most refined family hotel in the city 
— a home unsurpassed 



EI.MEK M. WOODBURY Manager 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 9, 1924 




By KEM 

I said in my heart, "I am sick of four walls and a ceiling 

I have need of the sky. 

I have business with the grass. 

I will up and get me away where the hawk is wheeling. 

Lone and high, 

And the slow clouds go by. 

I will get me away to the waters that glass 

The clouds as they pass " — Richard Hovey. 

THIS is vacation time, and many a noise-ridden city 
dweller slips away within at least reasonable distance 
of where "the hawk is wheeling"— a volume of poetry along 
for proper enjoyment. For readers, whose literary "palates 
require food from various flavored dishes. like the epicur- 
ean Chinese, the many worth-while anthologies, now on the 
market, offer rich sustenance a-plenty: The scholarly little 
lady in the Bookshop recommends either Untermeyer's 
"MODERN BRITISH POETRY." if one's thoughts der 
sire to roam across the seas, or better take the "MODERN 
AMERICAN POETRY" if desirous of speech with Emily 
Dickinson, George Sterling. Robert Frost. — scores of mod- 
ern poets. Here one can smile with Eunice Tietjens over 
"The Drug Clerk" who rests 

"Much manicured hands upon the counter — 

Where are cosmetics, powders, paints. — the arts 

That hunted women use to hunt again 

With scented flesh for bait." 
and speaks : 

"No, we don't carry no pomade. 

We only cater to the high-class trade." 
— or one can ponder with Margaret Widdimer over her 
question : 

THE MODERN WOMAN TO HER LOVER 
"I shall not lie to you any more. 

Flatter or fawn to attain my end — 

I am what never has been before. 

Woman — and Friend. 

I shall be strong as a man is strong, 

1 shall be fair as man is fair. 

Hand in locked hand we shall pass along 

To purer air: 

I shall not drag at your bridel-rein, 

Knee pressed to knee we shall ride the hill: 

I shall not lie to you ever again — 

Will you love me still?" 

The Untermeyer Antologies. — Haircourt Brace & Co., $2. 

* * * 

THE GIPSY TRAIL— an Anthology for Campers is 
a handy-sized little volume for nature-lovers who wish to 
keep company with Walt Whitman, Emerson, Robert Louis 
Stevenson, Shelley, Yeats and numberless poets who have 
given u^ priceless pictures of the great out-doors. 

Mitchell Kennedy, $2. 

* * * 

THE LITTLE BOOK OF MODERN VERSE, THE 
SECOND B< » >K < IF M( >DERN VERSE, THE LITTLE 
BOOK OF AMERICAN POETS, all three by Jessie B. 
Rittenhouse, herself a poet, are little pocket-sized volumes, 
intimate, representative, "a direct response to the newly 
awakened interest in poetry" where along with modernly 
g?:ssggi:ggggggss:si;sg : i'gsssgg2sasssisi:gsss3HSsssii 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

* PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco 



voiced yearnings one can find gems like John Vance 

Cheney's 

"The happiest heart that ever beat 
Was in some quiet breast 
That found the common daylight sweet. 
And left to Heaven the rest." 

Published by Houghton Mifflin Co., $2.50. 

* * * 

A MISCELLANY OF AMERICAN POETRY gives us 
on the Publisher's say-so, big mouthfuls of verse by eleven 
modern personalities — Conrad Aiken, John Gould Fletcher, 
Vachel Lindsay, James Oppenheim, Carl Sandburg, Sara 
Teasdale, Robert Frost, Amy Lowell, Edwin Arlington 
Robinson and the two married poets — Jean Starr and Louis 
Untermeyer. 

Harcourt, Brace and Howe. $2. 

* * * 

NEW VOICES, by Marguerite Wilkinson, and the new 
volume of hers just issued,— "CONTEMPORARY PO- 
F.TRY," — are substantial library-sized volumes, well-in- 
dexed, where one can find scores of poet's outpourings from 
A to Z. The first volume is valuable because of Mrs. Wilk- 
inson's interpretative criticism. She makes us ask ourselves 
about Carl Sandburg's verse: "Do I like this because it is 
poetry or because a manly personality is speaking?" and 
challenges us with many riddles about other writers, as 
apropos of Grace Fallow Norton's lyric "Love is a Terrible 
Thing" when she tells us "Men will" hardly understand this 
poem as well as women. It is essentially feminine. If a 
man were to say that 'Love is a terrible thing' he would 
not mean what a woman means when she says it." 

NEW VOICES, MacMillan Co., $2.25. 

CONTEMPORARY POETRY, .MacMillan Co.. $2. 



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August 9, 1924 



\XI) CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



\ The Romance of California Industries 

/ By Reginald F. Berkeley 

(Part 4) 
The Early Settlers of California 

B_'T I am travelling too fast, the gold story is not to lie 
dismissed with such scant mention. It begins indeed 
earlier than the Missions, though little is known of the 
first finders. Y\'e have reason to knew that the early in- 
habitants of California were Mongolians, Tartar invaders, 
and that gold, to no small amount, was extracted from our 
soil and manufactured into various decorative articles, its 
use as money apparently unknown at that time. The riches 
of California — then known as Quivera — were proverbial 
more than four centuries ago. More remarkable still, those 
early settlers practiced the Christian religion, (imported 
from Mexico, the home of earlier settlers of the same race), 
owing their conversion to Nestorians (in the service of 
Genghis Khan), who accompanied Kublai Khan on the jour- 
ney that led him by accident to California. 

Strange, indeed, "to recall in the year 1924, in the Japa- 
nese exclusion action, a revival of the embers of the fires 
of jealousy first manifested by the Spaniards in their de- 
struction of all traces to be found of the Mexicans — a race 
little distinguishable from the Japanese and Chinese of to- 
day, the same race as the Indian tribes, some of whom we 
still tolerate in our midst. It may not be long before we 
shall have further evidence of the existence in our valleys 
and mountains of Christians, such as have been recently 
unearthed in Mexico (rough statuettes of the Christ, the 
Lamb, the Cross). Even Solomon in all his glory was not 
furnished with the yellow metal as was Tataraxus, Cali- 
fornia's king, a worshiper of the Savior, a devotee of Our 
Lady. 

Gold played its part, it is useless to deny it. in the an- 
nexation of California; for Philadelphia's mint handled our 
gold many years earlier, sent thither by Stearns and others. 
The knowledge of the existence of the devil's handmaid 
can never be purely local, the reek of her carries far. 
Hydraulic Mining 



In their quest, the "rocker" was, not unnaturally, the tool 
of the first miners; followed by the "torn." the "flume" and 
the hydraulic stream. Into the "rocker" and ihe "torn" 
went the dirt shovellings of the naked (and usually un- 
clean) adventurer; to a lullaby that alternately blessed 
and cursed, in babel tongues; the while he added the liquor 
of his least liking, copying nature's workings in her rivers, 
The fluming was an interference with the world's mother; 
the drying of the bed of a stream by diverting the water 
in wooden flumes from the way it wanted to go. to enable 
the worker to handle better the gold-bearing sand and 
gravel. All the gulches were worked over, also, with or 
without water, and these proved the richest "placers. 
Those who got the rich bars on the \mcrican. Yuba, 
Feather, Stanislaus, and other streams in the heart of the 
gold districts might earn as much as $8000 a day, but— 
as with other highly paid manual labor there were among 
the- golden hours mam streaks that were not even silver. 
Mae. were ..died from more prosaic tasks by the Song 
of Circe, but lew were chosen to share her favors, and 
of these vet fewer quitted richer than the) came. 

The hydraulic stream was first used in 1852, when pros- 
pecting of the higher ground in. heated the presence 
in the "deep" or "high" gravels, i the detrital deposits oi 
tertian age), but in quantities that would not pan out sat- 
isfactorily if worked in the older ways, This process de- 



rived considerable stimulus from a series of rapidly suc- 
ceeding improvements in machinery and methods." Ter- 
rific blasts of powder, from 30 to 60 tons of it, shifted the 
gravel from its moorings to meet powerful jets of water 
thrown from the "pipes." ( )ne can imagine the effect when 
one learns that an eight-inch nozzle used under a heavy 
head will discharge around 3060 feet with a velocity of 
152 feet per second. A gravel bank hit with such a force 
found salvation in disintegration, its line of least resistance 
being through the sluices to the "dumps." Passing away 
to make room for other agents of destructive construction, 
hydraulic mining left disaster in its train, the "dumps" be- 
ing usually river-beds. In the decade, 1870-1880, the bed 
of Sleepy Hollow Creek was raised in places, by the de- 
tritus wash of the hydraulic mines, as much as 140 feet 
that of Bear River 100 feet. 

Farm Lands Ruined 

This filling up of the streams proved disastrous in many 
ways, and tens of thousands of acres of the best farm land 
were buried under gravel — around 17,000 on the lower 
Yuba, to mention one case only. But the miner ruled the 
roost (because he was filling the chests of society's carrion 
crows with his "throw-outs") and it was not until 1884 
that agriculture crowned a long and stubborn "anti-slick- 
ins" fight with the trophy of legal victory. Nine years later, 
the California Debris Commission was created, holding per- 
mits for hydraulic mining in its hands, to be issued only 
when all gravel was satisfactorily impounded and no harm 
would result to the streams. 

Quartz mining dates back to 1850. and was able to claim 
eleven-sixteenths of the total gold output by 1908. Quartz 
veins often g'et richer the deeper you follow their wayward 
course, and you may do so profitably for more thousands 
of feet than we know of yet. Since 1897 "dredging" has 
taken its place in the company of the golden "saints," and 
within fairly recent years some thousands of acres, even 
of vineyard, orchard, and other farming land, have been 
treated in this way. 

The story of gold in California is yet but half told, that 
to come likely to exceed all past achievements. When the 
tale is told in full, it may be a century hence, the 1848- 
1924 period will have lost its lustre, placed side by side 
with the years that arc to be. Colorado and Comstock 
will be put in the shade, and the economic effects will 
eclipse the wildest dreams of the "experts." The early eco- 
nomic stimulus was, however, not the smallest work of the 
vellow wonder-worker, as may be imagined. 

( To be continued. ) 




Motor Oils 



Are recognized by the highest authorities in engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform in 

i|U:llit\ 

A PL RE PENNSYLTAN1A PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 

162 Bryant St.. San Francisco. Cal. 

12L' Center St.. Los Angeles. Cal. 



+ 

i 

i 
j 
I 
I 
i 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 9, 1924 




Pleasure's Ww 



OBEY 



NO WAND BUT PLEASURES 

Tom Moore. 



Conducted by Thomas Ashe 



Orpheum 

Fannie Brice, lately starring- in Zeig- 
feld Follies, and now on the Orpheum 
circuit, is at the O'Farrell street vaude- 
ville house this week and is outstand- 
ing in her class. Her role embraces al- 
most everything from portrayal of an 
imbecile child aspirant for movie fame 
to tragedy. ■ She can dance, sing, and 
certainly provoke laughter. Especial- 
ly is she generous in her offerings 
which are entirely new and unique. The 
sobriquette, "The Dark Cloud of Joy," 
amply connotes Bill Robinson and his 
antics. He has a pair of post-graduate 
feet that certainly can step, and — al- 
most talk. His humor is clean and a 
certain affectation of shyness but adds 
to the efficacy of his act. Ben Moroff 
is a holdover and we are glad he has 
added a bit of the classic to his band 
numbers. Neville Fleeson and Ann 
Greenway. in "Samples," also over 
from last week, are well worth a sec- 
ond hearing. Herschel Mayall, look- 
ing as handsome as in the old Central 
Theater days and not a day older, is 
at home as sheriff in "The Striped 
Man," a sketch featuring Nick Cogley, 
well known negro impersonator, while 
Mascot, programmed "The Human 
Pony," is almost that and disports in 
an almost out of the merely instinct 
class. Interesting movies of our round- 
the-world aviators and swimmer en- 
trants at Olympiad complete a good 
bill of entertainment. 



Strand 

Thrills and more thrills — that de- 
scribes the Strand picture, "The Ari- 
zona Express," showing this week. 
The melodrama master, Lincoln J. Car- 
ter, wrote the story, and, while not 
overdone in breath-taking tricks of the 
stage, it is done to a finish. But with 
all its hair raising depiction of disas- 
ter and close escapes, it is clever and 
unfolds a gripping tale of the heroic 
railway mail clerk, well enacted by 
David Bahler, the heroine, Pauline, and 
the inevitable vamp, Evelyn Brent. 
The weakling black sheep of the fam- 
ily, played by Harold Goodwin, is on 
his way to the gallows and it is the 
filial and exciting duty of saving her 
foolish brother therefrom that brings 
about the overmeasure of tense adven- 
ture to his sister, Pauline Starke. In 
this she is pitted against an excellent 
villian. Francis McDonald, and, of 



course, finally outwits him and his de- 
vious plottings. "Bee's Knees," in the 
"Telephone Girl" series, is quite hu- 
morous with Alberta Vaughan leading 
a very good cast. Then Luis Firpo, 
he of the pampas, minus the fair Bian- 
co, who "went back," heaves his bulk 
into view via a news picture. 



Cameo 

A Mother story, this, at the Cameo; 
and yet not of the sickly sentimental 
order, either. Just a good, wholesome 
lessim portrayed for negligent sons and 
daughters. Tom Mix, riding in his us- 
ual centaur-like style, overtakes a head- 
strong autoist of the feminine gender, 
leaps from his horse into her car, and 
eventually stops it on a precipitous 
mountain road. Her gratitude is shown 
in the form of a legacy, which leaves 
an Old Ladies' Home to her rescuer. 
When he takes up his duties as owner 
and manager of this concern, he meets 
in one of the inmates, the hard-work- 
ing mother of a successful artist, wdio 
has made a sacrifice of her life for her 
ungrateful and unfeeling son. How the 
hero manipulates affairs so that the re- 
gretful son is ultimately brought to 
his mother's arms, and the much- 
adored owner of the Home is reward- 
ed by the girl he loves, makes a fine 
little play, up to the usual standard 
of the Cameo, and that is saying a good 
deal. Today comes "The Lure of the 
Yukon" with Jane Novak. 



Pacific Radio Exposition 

Plans for the second annual Pacific 
Radio Exposition, to lie held in the 
Civic Auditorium here August 16 to 21, 
inclusive, are rapidly nearing comple- 
tion and the show has assumed the 
status of an assured success, accord- 
ing to A, S. Lindstrom, chairman of 
the executive committee in charge. 

Lindstrom stated that there will be 
approximately 150 exhibits, represent- 
ing practically every type of radio re- 
ceiving set as well as various acces- 
sories such as loudspeakers, batteries, 
etc. Both structures are practically 
complete and an elaborate decorative 
scheme has been worked out. 



Warfield 

Colleen Moure is coming back to the 
screen of the Warfield — this time to 
present the world premier of her lat- 
est motion picture, "Flirting With 



Love." August 24 is the national date 
for the release of this story of life 
among the stage favorites of New 
York. Conway Tearle is chief in sup- 
port of Miss Moore and the direction 
is by John Francis Dillon, who also 
made "Flaming Youth" and "Lilies of 
the Field." 

On the stage Fanchon and Marco 
will present another of their intimate 
revues picturing a spot dear to the 
hearts of every San Franciscan — this 
will be "At Seal Rocks." And to make 
the act complete in every respect "Bub- 
bles." the educated seal, has been se- 
cured for the week. This is the trained 
seal which appeared with Louise Fa- 
zenda in "Dizzy Daisy." the comedy 
of the program, and among the play- 
ers on the stage will be the sensation- 
ally successful Jue Fong. There will 
be scores of other players with Lip- 
schultz and the Music Masters in con- 
cert. 



It appears that the arts are not to 
perish in our city. A new school has 
been opened at 1360 Post St. where 
Mine. Theodosia Durand, formerly di- 
rector of Fine Arts at the University 
cif Washington, heads the instruction. 
Although Mine. Durand has passed 
twenty-five years in foreign schools she 
still remembers a time when commer- 
cial art had no place in our schools 
and 'varsities. All this is changed now. 
and the evening classes and "short cuts 
for commercial artists" will be one of 
the main features of the new institu- 
tion. 



— "Jimmy likes only girls with bright 
red hair." "That's what I've heard. I'm 
dyeing to make him like me." 



7ach car ojberated 
hi/ reliable 
c/lauffeurs 
w/to morou(fMi/ u/rder- 
stand their £us/ness 



This means that you can 
dispense with all wor- 
ries as to personal se- 
curity when using our 
cars. Our drivers are 
careful and they never 
violate your desires for 
safety. 





Phone Franklin 217 
1639 Pine Street 
San Francisco 



^dtgjjpp 51 



August ". 1924 



\\'l> CALIF( »RN1 \ VDVERTISE1 



17 



\ The Growth of Cities 



"I lilies while 

may so affect il 

slow process. Much 



CERTAIN factors hasten the growth 
others stop that growth entirely or 
that the expansion becomes a very 

depends upon the ability of those 'who have the govern 
ment of cities in their charge to be able to see wisely into 
the future. Oakland is an instance of a city which recently 
has made a very rapid growth but which could have grown 
much more rapidly if at all times there had been this abil- 
ity to see into the future by those who ruled. 

Parts of the city have not grown and others have s1 1 

still and cannot grow because of a deliberate refusal or in- 
ability on the part of the mayor and city council and others 
to see the necessity of applying a little common sense in 
their dealings with those who would invest hundreds of 
thousands of dollars in industrial and other plants, within 
the limits of the city of Oakland. Recently there has come 
about the organization of the Western Waterfront Indus- 
trial Association. This association has a very comprehen- 
sive program and the members will do all they can to con- 
vince the authorities as to the necessity of taking- action in 
many directions to speed up the growth and expansion of 
the city. The association is demanding the extension of the 
sewer system, the reclaiming of the Key Route basin lands, 
the laying of new and adecpiate fire mains, and what is 
probably the most important item consisting in securing 
a charter amendment which will make it possible to give 
permanent industries a 50 year lease instead of the 25 year 
lease now prescribed. 

The settlement and the improvement of the waterfront 
has been extremely slow and every enterprise has found 
the greatest difficulty facing it on account of the short 
leasehold given by the city. No big industrial or other en- 
terprise is going to contemplate the investment and ex- 
penditure of hundreds of thousands of dollars on a twenty- 
five year leasehold and it is folly to think of such a possi- 
bility. The land back of the waterfront is inalienably at- 
tached to the waterfront and depends to the greatest extent 
for its value and the prosperity of those who own it on the 
prosperit) and the expansion of the business of those who 
own the waterfront leases and who are now demanding 
fifty year leases instead of twenty-live. During the last vear 
a large number of industrial enterprises could have been lo- 
cated on the western waterfront of Oakland but the own- 
ers were frightened away, and to other locations, by the 
conditions existing on that front and mainly by the fact 
that no lease could be obtained for more than twenty-five 
years. 

The waterfront is not profitable to Oakland and it never 
will be until something is done to ameliorate conditions as 
to many things but notably as to the length of time for the 
leasing of land. The waterfront of San Francisco, the ferry 
building and the bell line road, and every other factor, un- 
der the control of Harbor Board, is a profitable business 
enterprise and shows an average profit at the end of each 
year of approximately five hundred thousand dollars. It 
is entirelv self sustaining and has alvvavs had a surplus in 
the treasury for improvements, as they may be needed. 

There is no reason whv the Oakland front should not be 
equally profitable. It is argued by some that Oakland's 
front should in time bring in a greater revenue to the city 
than the San Francisco front brings at this time because 
Oakland is essentially an industrial city and there is prac- 
tically no limit to what it may be expanded industrially if 
the city fathers give their waterfront the attention usually 
a growing enterprise by the practical business man. 
The first step in that direction is the adoption of an amend- 
ment making possible the fifty year leases. 



A MINE AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BAY 



In San Francisco Lav is probablj the richest mine in 
California. Less than a vear ago the people of (his city 
were rather startled to hear that the oyster business was 
at an end. In the past three mouths comes the equally 
startling news that at the bottom of the bay are million's 
of tons of decomposed oyster shells and lime. The dis- 
covery was made by an engineer from Los Angeles, and 
it is now learned that from thirty to forty feet of shells and 
lime rest under the waters of the bay.' and the "lode" is 
so wast that it will take fifty years of "mining" to exhaust 
the supply. 

Work is now going on to install a cement plant on the 
oyster lands in the vicinity of Redwood City, and twelve 
hundred men are employed in the new mill that is to grind 
the shells and turn out sacks of cement for a half century 
to come. 

The real value of this shell product is not estimated as 
yet, but it is supposed to run high into the millions of dol- 
lars. The present plant is being built on the property which 
belongs to the Morgan Oyster Company, who controls 
about 13.000 acres. Another corporation owns and con- 
trols 12,000 acres adjoining this land, which are known to 
be as valuable as the grounds of the above company. 

Among the members of this Corporation are such well 
known men as Amos R. Kanaga, the irrigation expert; A. 
L. Hart, Attorney; O. N. Hirsch, Garage Shop; William 
Strelow, fruit shipper ; S. J. Simons and twenty others, from 
all parts of California. 

This land is now worth from one to three hundred dol- 
lars per acre. We are informed by some of the owners 
that work has been going on for over a year, collecting 
seed to plant shell fish in these oyster beds, including Home 
clams, which when grown on these lands, will be shipped 
to all sections of the West. 



Beauty at the Beach 

pictures a galaxy of multi-colored novelty bath- 
ing costumes designed for the freedom and grace 
of California's athletic girls. Charming models 
clad in tangerine, powder blue, checks, and 
striking black and white, effectively display the 
fads and fancies in 1925 beach apparel. 

How the Eskimo Hunts His Food 

shows the men of the far north wrestling their 
food from nature's own ice box. Next Sunday's 
rotagravue section vividly pictures this strenu- 
ous occupation carried on by a sturdy race. 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravue 

Section 



i 



+ . , + 

SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes, Offices and Factories. Quality Guaranteed 



KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 



U0 Russ St. 



Phone Hemlock 170 



San Francisco 



ARE YOUR BRAKES SAFE? 
We Specialize on Brakes Only. Flat Prices on All Cars 

S. F. BRAKE SERVICE 

ST. FRANCIS GARAGE, 124<> POST STREF.T 

Between Van Ness Ave and Franklin Street 
Plume Prospect 1915 



lcS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 9, 1924 



SecoNp speeDS 



Traffic Safety Company Shows Results 
San Francisco's record of only four 
automobile traffic fatalities in July, 
bringing- the total for the year to 49, 
as against 57 for the first seven months 
of 1923 and 70 for the same period in 
1922, proves the value of the consistent 
campaign of education which has been 
waged among the motorists of this city 
for the past eighteen months, accord- 
ing to Percy E. Towne, chairman of 
the public safety committee of the 
California State Automobile -Associa- 
tion. "It is an encouragement to the 
Association to believe that a reduction 
in traffic fatalities throughout the state 
as a whole can be brought about by the 
extension of its public safety work now 
under way," says Towne. Figures from 
the state as a whole indicate that last 
year's total of 1390 deaths will lie ex- 
ceeded this vear. 



National Forests Closed to Hunters 

The national forest areas in the coast 
district, where the deer season opened 
August 1, are absolutely closed to 
hunters, and no recreational permits 
of any kind will be granted by the Na- 
tional Forest Service. There are large 
forest and brush areas in the 19 coun- 
ties, however, not included in the na- 
tional forests in which deer are plenti- 
ful and in which hunting is not re- 
stricted. Stay out of the national for- 
ests with your guns and tackle, ad- 
vises the Automobile Association, and 
do not lay yourself liable to the fine of 
$500 or one year's imprisonment which 
the Federal courts may impose. 



Chittenden Pass Open 

The long desired "straight shoot" 
from the San Joaquin Valley to the 
coast has at last been made possible 
by the completion and opening of the 
Chittenden Pass road into Watsonville, 
the touring bureau of the California 
State Automobile .Association an- 
nounces. Taken in connection with the 
Pacheco Pass road from Fresno, Mer- 
ced and Modesto, this gives the Valley 
residents a good road all the way to 
Santa Cruz and adjacent coast points, 
much of it paved, and the remainder 
good gravelled road which will make 
travel possible and pleasant through- 
out the vear. 



Something in This! 
Elbert Hubbard once said: "The 
general superintendent of the New 
York Central, the other day told me 
that he never allows an engineer to 
take an engine out who is in an un- 
happy frame of mind. If the man has 



domestic trouble, ihey just pity him 
and suggest that he get another job. 
The fellow who is preoccupied, think- 
ing of himself and his troubles, is not 
the man you want to trust your life 
with. The safe man is the happy man 
-the one with the contented mind." 
What a thought for auto drivers! 



Attorney: "When I was a boy my 
greatest ambition was to become a pi- 
rate." Client: "You're in luck. It isn't 
every man who can realize the dreams 
of his youth." 



California auto license plates for 1925 
will have a yellow field and black num- 
erals. It is quite evident the merchan- 
dising department of some live opera- 
tor has been on the job. 



— Dick: "Have you noticed how 
Dodd drops his aspirates?" Harry: 
"Yes, but that's nothing to the way 
he drops his vowels. I've more than 
a dozen of his I O U's." 



When the sheriff of Montreal found 
that he could not get quick action in 
gathering men for jury duty, he took 
fifty taxicabs and rounded up a hun- 
dred men in a hurry. 



— Josh Billings, the famous Ameri- 
can humorist, is reported to have said, 
"W hen a man comes to me for advice. 
I find out what advice he wants and 
give it to him." 



Auto Trunks 

AUTOMOBILE TRUNKS AND 

TRUNK RACKS 

W. R. Malm & Co. 

2010 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



1140 Geary Street «««► Tel. Franklin 3685 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metnl H'orlt Appertaining to Automobiles 
Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Blacksmlthlng 

II. W. Culver AI. Daberer K. Johnson 



— "I have never had a penny in my 
life." boasted the profiteer, "that has 
not been earned honestly." "By 
whom?" asked the cynical friend. 

SUMMONS 

In the Superior Court of the State of California 

in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. No. 147893. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the 
State of California in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco, and the complaint filed 
in the office of the County Clerk of said City 
and County. 

Mary Aruksar, Plaintiff, vs. Alexander Aruk- 
sar, Defendant. 

The People of the State of California Send 
Greetings to: Alexander Aruksar, Defendant. 

Vnu are hereby required to appear in an ac- 
tion brought against you by the above-named 
Plaintiff in the Superior Court of the State of 
California, in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, and to answer the Complaint 
filed therein within ten days (exclusive of the 
day of service) after the service on you of this 
summons, if served within this City and County; 
or if served elsewhere within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judg- 
ment and decree of this Court dissolving the 
bonds uf matrimony now existing between 
plaintiff and defendant, on the ground of de- 
fendant's willful desertion, also for general re- 
Lief, as will more fully appear in the Complaint 
on file, to which special reference is hereby 
made. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you 
appear and answer as above required, the said 
Plaintiff will take judgment for any money or 
damages demanded in the complaint as arising 
upon contract or will apply to the Court for 
other relief demanded in the complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of the Su- 
perior Court of the State of California, in and 
for the City and Countv of San Francisco. 

fated June 24. 1924. 

H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
(Seal) By W. R. Castagnetto, Deputy Clerk. 

AUSTIN LEWIS, 

4 73 Mills Bldg.. San Francisco, Calif., 
Attorney for Plaintiff. 





GET INTO THE BOAT AND SEE FOR YOURSELF 



Our Invitation to You 

A ride in a Johnson equipped boat will show 
you why water enthusiasts bought more 
Johnson Motors last year than any other 
make. 

Simply tell us where and when and we shall 
be g-lad to arrange a demonstration. 

Your vacation or week-end outings need no 
longer be restricted to the over-crowded 
high ways — 



DEALERS 
WANTED 



A. G. IIEBGEN 

Distributor 
660 Howard St. Sun Francisco, Cal. 

Tel. (o.rliH.i 1.569 



BOATS 

CANOES 

MARINE ENGINES 



— * 



BLANCO'S 

O'FiirrHl anil LarHn Streets 
1'hone Franklin 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 
Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. in.).. 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. .51.75 



tpen Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 
In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners. $1.25 

Meals Served a la ('arte. Also Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 

Fish and Game a Specialty 



Louis Cerles, Jean Barrere, 
John Piegth, Props. 



Nrtw i>Jjarnn (grill 

Formerly Bergez-Frank's Old Poodle 
Dog. Bush St. 

French Table-D'Hote Dinner Served 
Sundays & Holidays, $1.25 

35 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel. I'l Sutter 8668 



+■- 
*- 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Pel. San Bruno 116. San Bruno, Cal. 



+■- 

+•■ 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



*- 



J. , 4 

1 

1 Every Woman 


Should 


! Look Her Best 


j Keep her hair trimmed, shingled 
or htibliMl. 


AT 


Cosgrove's Hair Store 


815 Clement S(. 1 „ _ 
860 Geary St. ( San * rancisc °- 
2331 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley 


Established 28 Years. i 


MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE j 





■ + 



! W. W. HEALEY 

! Notary Public 

j Insurance Broker 

j 208 CROCKER BUILDING 

i Opposite Palace Hotel 

| Phone Kearny 301 San Francisco 

+ 1 

GANTNER & MAISON 

Funeral Directors 
Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 

Bet. 18th and 19th Sts. 
Telephone Market 64 San Francisco 



Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once 
or twice a day 1b taking- very good care 
of them. Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your 
teeth which only a competent dentist can 
take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. 
A toothache means trouble ; do not wait 
for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy 
teeth faster than decay. Are your teeth 
sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 335 

specialists — ^tractions; Crowns; 

Self Cleaninc Bridges; Pureelain Work 
and Rootless Plates. 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile . 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 




N. W. CORNER 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



Suit*. Pressed by Hand, Only — 
Suits Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



.V.* I Post Street 
In Virginia Hotel 



San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 2510 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
?oal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited or mav we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA' STREET 
Prospect 3418-Phones-Prospect 3419 

WHAT REST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 




MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
IhenewHEXEON " 
process. ■* 




ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



! 



-•+ 



Phone Garfield 30?6 Palmer Graduate 

Hours 10 to 1 and 2 to 6 

DR. W. N. CLAYTON 

Chiropractor 

Western States Life Building 

i ft!).-. Market Street San Francisco ' 

+ — 1 + 



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500,000 

in one day 
saw the new 



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Standard Six 



Announcement of the new Buick 
"Standard Six" brought approxi- 
mately 500,000 people into Buick 
salesrooms on the first day this 
car was shown. 

Why? Because everywhere every- 
one is marveling atthe new "Stand- 
ard Six"— the "Six" that sets a new 
standard of quality and price. 

See it forlfourself 



— 4* — 

HOWARD 

AUTOMOBILE 
COMPANY 



Van Ness and California 
San Francisco 

Branches in 
Los Angeles — Portland — Oakland 

"The Largest Distributor of Automobiles 
in the World" 



Your Tax Collector 



ABOUT one-tenth of your power rate — 
» ten cents on every dollar that you pay 
to a power company in this state — repre- 
sents taxes paid by that company to the 
state and federal governments. The state 
gets seven and a half cents and the federal 
government gets about two and a half cents 
of that ten. 

Virtually all the tax revenue of the state 

g-overnment is collected from corporations. 
But the corporations must and do get it 
back from their customers in the charge for 
service as an expense of doing business. 

Who, then, really pays the state taxes? 

The corporations do not support the state 
government. They are merely tax collectors 
for the state. Instead of paying your taxes 
directly to the state you pay them through 
corporations in rates. 

Why, then, are corporations, since they 
do not really pay the state taxes, so unwill- 
ing to accept increases of the state tax rate? 

Because tax collecting is an unpopular job 
and corporations, striving to please the 
public, are reluctant to incur the unmerited 
blame for higher rates caused by the increase 

of taxes. 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 



•PACIFIC SERVICE" 



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24-724 



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ESTABLISHED Jl IA •_•(). IK.1U 




PRICE 10 CENTS " $5.00 PER YEAR 

California Advertiser 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 1924 



OS ANGELES 



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|HE HETCH HETCHY is per- 
haps the most talked of subject 
amongst San Franciscans today. 
This week begins "Those Hetch Hetchy 
Bonds." The history of California is be- 
ing portrayed in the series: "The Romance 
of California Industries." Editorials are 
brief, concise, fearless and instructive. 
Society, Library Table, Pleasure's Wand, 
Financial, Comment on Foreign Affairs. 



s= 



3E 



3E 



WAWti' 1 " - ■ ^ " " " '" :: " ? '.« '■' '' ''- « " « '" »'"»'« 
Ce sue *Ce 



kMSSKj*' «■ »¥ a a a a a a a a a a a a a' a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a _^ ^ 







£<M II 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

Assets $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 446,024.41 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haipht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4M) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Investment Service Awaits Your Call 

Our list contains the choice of Eastern and Western bond offerings, state, 
municipal, school, irrigation and industrial securities. 

We will he pleased to counsel you in the issuance, purchase, and handling of 
investment securities. 

Let us solve your investment problems. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

7 09 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

S 1 7-1 S California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 

Two Wall 

street 




I'lfit.. Glass 

Accident nni 
Health 



Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



Travelers Checks 

for those contemplating CANADIAN TOURS 

may be purchased at 

450 California Street 
Telephone Douglas 27S3 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 



( 0~cer 600 branches in Canada J 



The Name PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, wheth- 
er It be typewrit- 
er paper or man- 
uscript cover 
means complete 
satisfaction. 
There is a grade 
for every need. 
Ask your printer 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 




•4 1 First Street 



San Francisco 



San Francisco Plating Works 

1340-51 Mission St., bet. Oth and 10th 

E. G. Denniston, Prop. 
Phone Market 2915 

We plate every description of metal 
work and goods with Gold, Silver, 
Nickel, Brass. Copper and Bronze in 
an elegant and durable manner. 

We call for and deliver work 

Automobile and Household Goods a 
Specialty 




THE BEST 
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IN THE WORLD 

PRICE 
PUMP 

The best evidence that the 
PRICE PUMP will meet your 
particular needs is the fact that 
it has been meeting the needs 
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be sufficient reason for you to 
get complete information about 
the PRICE PUMP. 

Write For Catalog 

G. W. PRICE 

PUMP & ENGINE CO. 

Manufacturer* 
MemlierH Western Irrigation Equip- 
ment. Ahnii. 
I.V.O I ■■..!-.. i mi St. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



32 



1 



i 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Cough 
Telephone Park 271 



Myrtledale Hot Springs 

The Wonder of the Pacific Coast 

in the Napa I alley 

Modern Hotel Geyser Heated Rooms 

Natural Mud. Steam, Sulphur Baths 

Swimming and Amusements 

R. Roy Leveira, Prop. 

Calistoga, Cal. 



EL VERANO VILLA 

Surrounded by beautiful grove of trees. 
Country Resort for families. Open all 
year. Motion pictures, dancing pavi- 
lion, bowling alley. Free bus to Min- 
eral Springs daily. Rates $14 week up. 
Capt. A. TULLETT. Prop.; Marcel. Mgr., 
El Verano. Sonoma Co.. or Peck-.Iudah. 



EtUMIihcd July tO, I&36 




ITER 

I ited to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 





SAX FRANCISCO. CALIF.. SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 1024 



Vol. CV 



No. 7 



THE SAX FRAXC1SCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. Russ Building. 235 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. 
Calif. Telephone Douglas CS53. Entered at San Francisco, Calif.. Post 
Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 



— The successful man 
"lucky." 



is one whom 



the failures dub 



— Political speakers ought to know what they are talk- 
ing about, even if their listeners do not. 

— "Woman's work is never done," says Abe Martin; 

"Ther's alius some place on her face she's missed." 

* * * 

— The reported discovery of a milk cure for failing' sight 
should, if it is established as reliable, be a great help to 
humanity. It consists of injecting milk into the lumbar 

region. 

* * * 

— The world flyers will wind up their marvelous feat .in 
California. They began the flight here and it is only right 
they should finish it here. California will give these men 

a right royal welcome on their return. 

* * * 

— In Scotland should a lassie drop her new shoes before 
they are worn, she firmly believes that they will bring 
her trouble. To escape that, the shoes are sometimes burned, 
and sometimes buried. One instance where superstition 

gets the better of Scotch thriftiness. 

* * * 

— In view of the few remarks made as to the number 
of clerks attending sessions to see that their salary size lie 
increased, would not this he a good time to investigate 
how many of these clerks might with profit to the city 
have their salaries obliterated altogether? 

* * * 

— In these days when one finds a thrill on every disgust- 
ing page of the daily papers we wonder why it is that peo- 
ple into whose care is given the task of watching over 
the moral welfare of the rest of the community drop into 
the commission of vulgar and brutal crimes? 

* * * 

— The length of time we have been talking about it one 
would think this city ought to lie bridged in all directions 

to the satisfaction of everyone concerned. But talk is 
cheap and construction costs are high and this may ac- 
count for all of the talk and the lack of construction. 

* * * 

— The Russian Soviet Propagandists are given the credit 
for the mass attacks by the Reds of Italy on Mussolini 
and Fascism. Mussolini seems to have the situation well 
in hand, however, and is not shaken apparently by the 
heckling and the rioting which have occurred. 



--Race suicide note in the Ohio State Journal : "Jack 
Pickford and Marilyn Miller have been married more than 
a year now and have an awfully cute little wire-haired fox 
terrier." 

* * * 

— The Georgia legislators who resent the theory of evo- 
lution that the human race owes its descent to the ape 
have solemnly declared their belief and made their repudia- 
tion by resolution. That act. of course, settles the matter. 

— Somebody is trying to start a movement to inspire the 
great middle class, whatever that may mean. The only 
thing that will bring immediate results in the way of in- 
spiration to the said class is the dollar mark. This has 
the effect also of holding the owner of several of these 
dollar marks for an almost unlimited time. 

— The Hetch Hetchy problem is one of those puzzles 
defying anyone who may attempt to unravel its political 
side. Its vastness and its ramifications demand that a his- 
tory be written by someone who is strictly impartial. This 
is what will have to be done before the pot boils over, 

which is likely to happen almost any time now. 

* * * 

— The pothering about Defense Day is nonsense. The 
day is not at all devoted to a glorification of war. It is 
simply a day devoted to remembrance and to taking steps 
to be prepared to meet emergencies as they may arise. In 
reality the day is devoted to the preventing of anything 
like war by being fully prepared to meet it should it come 

upon us. 

* * * 

— If Darrow can make irresponsibility a successful de- 
fense for the two young men who murdered the little Franks 
boy he will have gone far along the road to win freedom 
for all murderers in the future. Because the infliction of 
a life sentence imprisonment may be curtailed after a few 
years by some maudlin governor at the instance of a maud- 
lin public. 

* * * 

— Our forest fires are still blazing in spots and the dam- 
age done has been great. If the contention that members 
of the 1. W. W. have caused the fires or if the fires are 
incendiary the punishment may not be too severe. The 
time is rapidly advancing when those who offend against 
the people by destroying natural wealth will be treated 

with no mercy whatever. 

* * * 

— Long ago. the physicians came to the conclusion that 
certain symptoms indicate certain diseases and practice 
seemed to prove that these conclusions based on symptoms 
were correctly taken. Now. we are asked by many who 
pretend not to believe in physicians' diagnosis, that there 
is nothing in symptomology and that there is nothing in 
medicines and that all doctors are frauds. The answer to 
any such is that there are doctors and doctors. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 16. 1024 




The land is very dry and quite a little 
An Early Fall weary, as if the burden of the long- drought 

were already falling on its shoulders this 
early in August; whereas, it is usually at least middle Sep- 
tember before the good, old, peasant earth seems to bow 
under the load. This year there is everywhere a sense of 
fatigue, gentle but quite unmistakeable. One feels it in the 
distant hills which turn blue with a blueness that belongs 
alone to the fall. The hills are always blue near the coast 
in California, so richly and beautifully blue that they are 
marked from hills elsewhere by that very quality. We ha\e 
had artists and we still have them who will compare well 
with their fellows in the outside world. But none of them 
have ever painted the California coast mountains. You 
shake your head at this, as at captious or ill informed 
criticism. Look at the hill then look at the pictures: yotl 
will see that the distinguishing glory of these hills has not 
gone down on the canvas and that, so far, the artists who 
have undertaken to perpetuate the beauty of the state have 
fallen short in their painting of the mountains near the bay 
down the coast. And now these mountains -are taking ot: 
the haunting, delicate sweetness of the late fall; the blue 
hangs low in the canyons and, as you watch the range, 
it' gradually takes possession, until there are miles of its 
softness and wonder. To look at the Monterey hills is to 
see a procession of lovely mountains and forests wrapped 
in a blue mist; a picture which appeals as much to the 
emotions as to the vision. Spring with its exquisite deli- 
cacy and its rich store of verdure and laughing flowers is 
a yearly delight, but the fall comes, here, with a beauty 
of its own, not blazing in orange and red and crimson and 
yellow, as in the Atlantic States and the forests of Michi- 
gan, but blue and gentle. Ours is such a mitigated fail 
after all, for hardly is it here when the rains come and 
tired nature laughs into green fields and springing life. 



Possibly, before this week's issue 
The Immediate Future is circulated, it may happen that 

the proposals for a settlement of 
the European troubles by the adoption of the Dawes Plan 
will be accepted and that we shall actually be a long step 
nearer, at least, a tentative solution of the trouble. On the 
other hand France may not agree to that limitation upon 
her occupation of the Ruhr district which alone can make 
the Dawes solution possible. Let us suppose that the Dawes 
Plan is accepted sufficiently at least to make its trial pos- 
sible. What then? There should be a chance to make 
money by those who have foresight and practical money- 
making ability, which by the way is a talent all by itself. 
Something' of a boom should occur as a result of the put- 
ting on the market of the bonds which will be required 
to make the initial payment to Germany. The bonds 
issue will tend to the putting out of money and hence 
to the stimulation of the market which leads to a 
boom, and which may easily lead to a longish boom, given 
the proper popular psychological reaction to the boom and 
the new money stimulation. These seem to lie quite reason- 
able anticipations and there should be a period of very 
distinctively good times in the near future. But all this 
gives no color of reason to the prognostications of those 
who are talking about a fifty or even twenty-five years 
reconstruction period for Europe, as a result of the war. 
Modern industry can reconstruct so quickly that even ten 



years will suffice to put Russia on her feet and to have, 
as far as the rest of the world is concerned, destroyed all 
marks of war. But there does seem to be every chance at 
present of a revival of business and a more or less imme- 
diate return to prosperity. That promise is in itself enough 
for the solid business man who knows that sufficient unto 
the dav is the business thereof. 



A visit to Monterey today will show 
The Citizens' Camp something new in the social life of 

this community. There is a military 
camp there, which is made up of volunteers, the pick of 
the young men of the state. That this last is no exag- 
geration nor any merely editorial opinion may be easilv 
verified by a look at the make-up and equipment of the 
young men whom you meet in the street and who are to 
be differentiated from the regular armv men by the shield 
on the collar. They are well set up, fine upstanding fellows. 
We may easily challenge the world to match them for 
physique and appearance. And. what is more, thev are a 
great improvement on their predecessors in manners and 
poise, in many communities the aggregate collection of 
such a 'body of young men in a strange and small town 
would lead naturally to a greater or less disturbance of the 
normal life and to many acts which would have to be later 
apologized for on account of the youth and high spirits of 
the amateur soldiers. Not so here. You meet them in the 
restaurant; they are soft spoken, well behaved, modest and 
their conduct with the young women, who have come down 
to visit them, is quite beyond criticism. The camp is edu- 
cational to a degree which would have been incredible 
if it had not actually happened. The soldiers for the most 
part appear to belong- to the office-workers and the exe- 
cutive and clerical forces of the great industrial and finan- 
cial concerns. There is a distinct mark of the office about 
them. This is to be regarded as a weakness, so far. The 
camp would give much more promise if there were a 
greater admixture of the higher artisan type, without which 
no modern force can lie of any particular account. Also the 
association of the workshop and the office in the annual 
military training would be of great advantage to both. 
There is no reason why it should not be made an oppor- 
tunity for mutual understanding. So far the citizens' train- 
ing camp is admirable and effective. 



It can no longer be successfully denied 
The Crime Flood that we are having another flood of 

crimes. The daily press is little less 
than a chronicle of murders, suicides and sex crimes of a 
revolting nature. We have as leaders the Leopold and 
Loeb murder in Chicago in which Clarence Darrow is mak- 
ing the defense on the ground of mental irresponsibility. 
We have murders of girls by the wholesale and the elimina- 
tion of rivals in love affairs by the pistol route. We have 
rich men's sons driving their automobiles at full speed 
through assemblages of people and threatening those who 
arrest them with losing their job, "as soon as father gets 
busy." One crime unpunished or inadequately prosecuted 
encourages a host of others, of the same or a worse char- 
acter. 



The Leopold and Loeb crime is of 
One Particular Crime course the one which offends the 

most and which is glaringly in the 
public eye. It may be taken for granted the public has 
judged in this case and that it is waiting impatiently for 
the case to be finally disposed of by Judge Caverly. It is 
almost an assured fact that the people have already sen- 
tenced the two men who killed young Franks to he hanged 
and the public is now curious as to what disposition Judge 
Caverly will make of the criminals. 



August 16, 1924 



\XD C \LIFORNl \ \DVERTISER 



£.XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX\XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX*/ 

Those Hetch Hetchy Bonds 

By Chandler Harris 
^♦XXXXXXXSXXX^X^XSfVXXXXXXXVXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXVXXXXXXXXXXXXX v 



II' IS a must difficult task to write about the 1 letch 
Hetchy, and any of its thousand ami one phases, ami 
write about it in a sane and conservative manner. Refer- 
ence in this sentence is ii"t as regards the actual physical 
work accomplished in the big undertaking. \\ e know that 
wonderful results have been obtained and every returned 
excursionist will hold up his hands in horror at the ignor- 
ance and impudence of anyone having the courage to at- 
tack such results as have heen gained by the city and its 
force of engineers and contractors in the Hetch Hetchy. 

\ml it is a most difficult matter to cause the aforesaid 
returned excursionist to consider the Hetch Hetchy from 
the political standpoint. The political standpoint has lit- 
tle to do with the practical standpoint. Vet there are those 
who say that such a statement may not be founded on fact 
and that every phase of the Hetch Hetchy needs thorough 
examination, before anything like an unassailable conclu- 
sion may be arrived at. 

And, in order to arrive at conclusions for our readers, 
it will be necessary to take these readers into the history 
of Hetch Hetchy, from the very beginning to the present. 
Before doing this, however, we will have to treat of the 
bond issue it is proposed to call to build one tunnel and 
a piece of another one. We must write of this now because 
it is really the most important question in relation to the 
Hetch Hetchy before the public, at this time. And not only 
must we attack the validity of the issue of these bonds, but 
we must say something regarding other bond issues and 
the uses to which the money raised by the sale of such 
bonds were put. 

We are face to face with the decision of the authorities 
to place before the people for their acceptance or rejection 
a proposal to issue bonds for ten millions of dollars for the 
purpose of building one tunnel and a piece of another one. 
This proposal will be voted on at an election, to be held 
October 7th. 

It is contended by lawyers, who are supposed to know 
of what they speak, that it is provided by the Charter of 
the City and County of San Francisco and by State law 
that no money obtained by the sale of bonds may be used 
for any other purpose than is indicated on the ballot and 
that money, secured through a bond issue, must be applied 
to a COMPLETED project. It is contended that a tunnel, 
or a piece of a tunnel, is not at all a complete project in 
any sense of the meaning of the Charter provision or the 
reading of the law. Any tax payer of the City and County 
of San Francisco may enjoin the city and county from ex- 
pending the money secured through the sale of the bonds 
on any piece of a tunnel or any other part of the Hetch 
Hetchy project that will not result in completing the pro- 
ject. 

It will subsequently be shown that, under no circum- 
stances, will the City and County of San Francisco obtain 
sufficient- water at all times from the Hetch Hetchy, no 
matter how much money is spent to make it possible. There 
are many reasons why this is said to be true. The main rea- 
son is that San Francisco really owns no valuable right to 
take water from the Tuolomne river. Its findings on that 
river were made much later than those owned by the irri- 
gation districts. The Raker law provides that the irriga- 
tion districts shall have the right to the water as far as 
their needs compel and that, thereafter, if San Francisco 
has expended every effort to obtain water by the purchase 
of Spring Valley, or from any other source available to it. 
it may then and only then take from the Hetch Hetchy 



such surplus water as the irrigalionists have no use for. It 
is contended by many that after the irrigalionists have been 
supplied it will be only once about every four or five years 
that there will be any surplus water in the reservoir for 
San Francisco's use. 

The above is just a bare statement and there are many 
explanatory details which might be added, but the state- 
ment will serve to illustrate the decision the people should 
arrive at to charge the sums already expended in the Hetch 
Hetchy to profit and loss, and to vote down the proposition 
of an issue of ten million dollars which will not give them 
water. 

Those of us having the interests of the city at heart should 
ponder on the above and should demand that the city au- 
thorities lay all their cards on the table and, on demand, 
give an explanation of any problem presenting itself. It 
is argued that it would be far better for the city to lose 
wdiat it has already invested than to lose millions of dol- 
lars more and still have no water to show for its expended 
money. The power plant may be developed and the power 
sold and the irrigation districts may use what water it is 
possible to store and the money derived from these sources 
may be applied on the payment of the bond interest which 
must be paid every year. 



I 




Motor Oils 



Are recognized by the highest authorities in engine 
building as the most economical, efficient and uniform in 
quality — 

A PURE PENNSYLVANIA PRODUCT 

VALVOLINE OIL COMPANY 

462 Bryant St., San Francisco, Cal. 
122 Center St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



The New Society Blue Book 

Wish to announce that they are now- 
making ready tor press. This book 
will contain the names and addresses, 
phones, etc., of the most prominent 
families in San Francisco. Alameda 
County, Marin County, San Mateo 
County, etc. Also men and women's 
clubs of high social standing. 

For Reservations and Addresses, Communicate With 

Marguerite M. Pinchard, Publisher 

1659 Mason Street, San Francisco, Oil. 

Phone Franklin 6912. 

Subscription Price $6.00 Per Year. 



. — + 



VON LUX 

HAIR DRESSING ACADEMY 

556 GEARY ST. 
PHONE PROSPECT 9S20 



6 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER August 16, 1924 

The Romance of California Industries 



By Reginald F. Berkeley 



(Part 5.) 

BEFORE leaving the individual treatment of the "gold 
age" of the state — its glinting threads still shine 
through warp and woof of California's daily life — some- 
thing more is to be said as to its working in the mind of 
Washington. Apart from the fact that gold was known 
to exist in large quantities in the late thirties of the 19th 
century, we have black-and-white evidence that the author- 
ities at headquarters knew all about it, more indeed than 
California's natives in general. Letters exchanged between 
the Mint managers at Philadelphia and Abel Stearns, as 
early as 1842, referring- to gold shipments sent for assay, 
were extant until the fire of 1906, and taught us a well 
needed lesson concerning the proper care of historical doc- 
uments. An editorial in the San Francisco "Bulletin" in 
1868, gives the circumstances in full. Gold was sent in 
November. 1842, the report on it was received by Stearns 
the following August (you may not hurry the public of- 
ficial) ; the gold was California gold, taken from placers by 
Francisco Lopez, at San Francisquito, about 35 miles north- 
west from Los Angeles — strange growth from onion seed ! 
And the assay is definitely referred to as being' in the 
archives of the Society of Pioneers. 

Evidence of the knowledge of the gold wealth is afforded 
from many quarters, and what so many knew and was re- 
peatedly referred to as common knowledge, cannot have 
been hidden from those whose business it is to investigate 
natural resources. It may, in any case, be assumed that 
they kept themselves posted in the literature of the dav 
and they can hardly have overlooked Waddy Thompson's 
"Recollections of Mexico" in which repeated references are 
made to California's mineral wealth, her rich mines of 
gold and silver being specifically eulogized. And Thompson 
was United States Minister to Mexico in 1842. That Wash- 
ington knew as much as the Quaker city of brotherly love is 
evident from an article that appeared in the "New York 
Herald" from which the following are extracts : 

"We knew all about this gold as early as June. 1844. 
In that month we saw in the Secretary of State's office 
at Washington city, samples of gold brought in by 
Captain Stephen R. Smith, who was then purchasing 
mills to take out to Upper California, in the ship Cali- 
fornia, belonging to him and then lying at New Bed- 
ford." 

The article proceeds to quote a letter written by Smith 
in which he advised friends as follows : 

"You could establish yourself in business in Mon- 
terey as a merchant, have a branch of your store back 
in the interior. 150 miles, well stocked with all kinds 
of goods ; the place selected should be in the vicinity of 
the gold miners. You would find it profitable to take 
with you to the interior about $2000 worth of Span- 
ish six-pennys, shilling and two-shilling pieces. With 
these you buy the gold from the miners at a certain 
rate, and pay in silver coin. These men would buy 
your goods, and repay you in the identical silver coin, 
which you could pay out and out again, thus mak- 
ing profit both ways. 

"We did not accept the proposition of Captain Smith 
and regret that we did not. John Tyler and his cabi- 
net were as well aware that gold existed in large quan- 
tities in California, as James K. Polk and his cabinet 
were when the treatv with Mexico was made." 



Do Government officials read the leading newspapers? 
No denial of the statements made was ever issued. 

We have also the letter from Breck, the hunter of sea 
otters, written from Santa Barbara towards the end of 
1843, in which he gives his reasons for temporarily aban- 
doning the business in which he had done remarkably well. 
Here are some passages: 

"I have been very successful in sea otter hunting. I 
have given it up for the present, it being very danger- 
ous business. I hunted the coast last year from Tur- 
tle Bay to San Francisco, a distance' of about 700 
miles, in a canoe that three men could carry with ease. 
I am now going to try my luck in a gold mine and I 
think I can make it very profitable. The gold is found 
in the earth in a pure state, in particles from the size 
of a pea to an ounce weight, and covers a space of 
country nearly twenty miles square. I have picked 
out a lot for myself and worked ten days by way of 
trial, during which time I got eight ounces, the value 
here being about $16 per ounce." 

Definite enough reference to common knowledge, surely! 

A point of considerable significance, from the official stand- 
point, is the date, 1846, of the drafts of the contracts es- 
tablishing what was later the Pacific -Mail Steamship Com- 
pany. Liberally subsidized long before any need for the 
service had shown itself — as a commercial proposition — 
nominally a naval necessity, gold was the conceiver, gold 
was the objective, Californian gold. The applicants for 
passages' were met at Panama, berths being refused before 
the ships arrived where passengers would, it was well 
known, be found. The advertised destination of the steam- 
ships was Astoria. Oregon, but there was nothing to justify 
a service, certainly nothing to give warrant for a Govern- 
ment subsidy, in Oregon. A passenger and mail service, 
such as the contracts called for, would have been a joke, 
but for the gold fever anticipated because the causative 
germs were known to swarm. The administration arranged 
to provide a service, two years in advance, having deter- 
mined at that time to "annex" California. The authorities 
were fully cognizant of the existence of a territory 
measuring some 600 miles in length, by nearly 55 miles 
in breadth, from which gold could be swept with a hand- 
broom, from which it had been picked up for 400 years. 

Twenty years saw the end of the miner's lonely har- 
row. Mining henceforth had to take capital into a new 
partnership, luck having proved fickle. The annual value 
of the output had fallen from $65,000,000 in the fifties to 
around $20,000,000 in 1871. The new area of industry was 
foreshadowed by the decline, by 1873, of the production 
of gold to a little over half the exports from San Francisco. 
( To lie continued.) 



TRAINER -PARSONS OPTICAL CO. 

DISPENSING OPTICIANS 

186 GEARY STREET 

Near Stockton, Opp. City ot Paris 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Kearny 2767 



August 16. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 

XXS«XX5«VtSSSXJSX5t?<XX%NX%\XVVNNXXVNNNXXSV%»«V\S 

WHAT ;i wonderful tiling love is when in the bosom of 
a young girl! The man who has found the key there 
touches a pent-up baptismal font which sanctifies him. She 
calls him "wonderful." not knowing it is but she who makes 
him so. And what an inordinate hypocrite he always is. 
complacently taking her high regard for granted, as his 
due! He knows he will never make good, even if she 
could keep up idealization of him, which she cannot, it be- 
ing young and immature. Think, however, what chances 



he throw s 



He might, though so seldom he does, 



build a character of himself for her eyes when they are 
older and keener, the seeds for this being shown in the 
fertility of her affections, when these mean more than fond- 
ness only, for being still virginal, they admit his raising 
himself to a true ideal when she can see him better. 

The very young girl who coldly calculates the material 
conditions of her marriage is an abnormality of the species. 
An older woman, who has been through many hardships 
of life, too weary to risk further love, and who has lost 
the picture of an ideal husband, might be forgiven, but we 
cannot but give a disagreeable estimation of the character 
of an immature girl who stands ready to coin her physical 

personality for gain. 

* * # 

— One day we hear of extraordinary accomplishment in 
some field of endeavor or other by one younger than be- 
lievable before the news of an unheard-of feat by one of 
many years, and immediately we exclaim, "People don't 
grow old any more." Just what is our opinion in the cir- 
cumstances? It depends on what we see from wdiere we 
stand. One fault in the subject is where old age has be- 
come so mossy it can no more realize the possibilities of 
youth; and another is committed by the champions of the 
young, who forget that youth goes forward wonderfully 
only when it can experience itself in mind and body with 
unusual quickness, which again proves that it cannot to- 
tally supplant experience. Two years before the war 
youth's idolatrous admirers would have said that young 
generals would be the only force in any war to come, but 
the world war's commanders were men very advanced in 
years. 

What can we say where men of middle age win in phy- 
sical contests — the particular province of very early man- 
hood? Stenroos, an athlete of forty, the other day at Paris 
won the Olympic Marathon; and Zbyzko, wonder of ath- 
letes, whose age is given variously from forty-six to fifty- 
two, is still wrestling. He stands second in this game, 
which is no child's play, nor is it good for dotage. 

* * * 

— Figures are cold because we don't think of their mean- 
ing, but if we do, they should be as pills for the brain. 
Forty-eight deaths by automobile accidents mean more 
than' 6 times 8. The real import here is that a family has 
been saddened over one lost, and the fulness thereof is felt 
by suffering in one's thoughts with that family, and then 
by trying to realize it 48 separate times. Now. if one tries 
to picture in items — choosing them for himself — wdiat $3.- 
000,000 can represent in happiness, in the way of posses- 
sion of materials or things that pertain spiritually, he will 
not only learn to think better of figures, but get some idea 
of where Calvin Coolidge, President of the United States, 
has accomplished in arranging for the country's budget to 
be set at this amount. $3,000,000, This total expense named 
is for the fiscal year 1925-1926. 

Ponder a whole day on this, and you shall be almost 



a statesman, even better than many. When you have taken 
twenty-four hours to digest this pill of $3,000,000. and its 
whole value has fed your mind, you can easily get the gain 
in the fact that, 

"The maximum tluiN set by the President is nearly a 
billion dollars less than the amount which was required to 
operate the government in the years between the close of 

the World War and the establishment of the budget system 

in 1920." 

— Rufus Wilmot Griswold, a writer of 1854. tries to move 
his readers to a feeling of highest regard for his country 
in naming the remarkable men who framed the constitu- 
tion of the United States of America. Delegates were ap- 
pointed from every colony of the original confederacy to 
the convention assembled to frame the document, except 
Rhode Island. As Griswold describes the personal appear- 
ance, reputation and known deeds of each man, he indi- 
cates his elements of greatness. Together they made a 
dignified body of known merit. It was ordained that pos- 
terity should be proud of these men. In speaking of them 
for their every-day associates, Griswold quotes their known 
worth as of "good men and true." Then he exclaims, "God 
grant it may be ever so with the servants of the Republic!" 
Can we call back now in the same spirit with the words, 
"God knows it has?" 

* * * 

— The writer ran across a passage in an old book the 
other day which made him think that in the days before 
the idea of witchcraft was given up, it was easier to prove 
crime than insanity. Here is the quotation, from Fielding's 
"Tom Jones," written in the middle of the eighteenth cen- 
tury : "....and the puppet-show man said that madness 
was sometimes a difficult matter for a jury to decide. 'For 
I remember,' he said, 'I was once present at a trial of mad- 
ness, where twenty witnesses swore that the person was 
as mad as a March hare, and twenty others that he was 
as much in his senses as any man in England. And in- 
deed it was the opinion of most people that it was only a 
trick of his relations to rob the poor man of his right.' " 

* * * 

— It strikes us as strange the way that suburb of Chi- 
cago upholds the brutality of the police officer who struck 
Rosetta Duncan. Does it like this sort of thing? 



•J 












Pacific Gas and Electric Co. 

40th Consecutive 
QUARTERLY DIVIDEND 

on Firil Preferred Stock 

The regular quarterly dividend of $ t .50 per 
share upon the Preferred Capital Stock of 
this Company will be paid by check on Au- 
gust 15, 1924, to shareholders of record at 
close of business on July 31, 1924. 

U(«tP.™;n« 6 mos. io 12 mas. to 
Latest taming* Jonfl30 1924 Ju ne30.l924 

Grois earning! . $22,193,596 $42,317,645 
Net after tuei, etc. 8.461,878 16.457,402 
Surplus for Preferred 

Slock after prior charges 

and depreciation . 3.473.400 6.700.987 

Dividends pi id on 
Preferred Stock . 1.622,041 3,222,060 

Balance .... 1.851.359 3.478,927 

Earned per share of 
Preferred Stock . . $6.38 $12.30 

Dividends paid 1 5th February, May, 
Aug.ua and November 

San Francisco, A. F. HOCKENBEAMER 
California I 'tee- President and Treasurer 













h* ■ 







SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 16. 1924 




By ANTISTHENES 

Whales and Minnows 

IT WAS of a truth some wild yell of holy indignation 
that gutteralled from the rotund windpipe of Super- 
visor McLeran the other day. when, according: to news- 
paper report, he indignantly lashed forth in excoriation of 
a dozen or so city employes who were present in the su- 
pervisorial chamber intent on pressing their request fur 
a boost in salary. McLeran was right; these city servants 
should have been at work in their respective offices, but, 
unhappily, or, astutely — Mac didn't go far enough ; poli- 
ticians never do — that is, in certain directions! Why, for 
instance, did not the irate city father call to account the 
heads of these offices whose men were absent from their 
duties? No. Oliver, the head of an elective office has a 
measure of influence, and, would you be sufficiently mean 
to want a fellow to incur the displeasure incident to at- 
tacking men of power? Self-preservation is primal instinct, 
so it is but natural we attack the underling and glean from 
the advertising thereof what prestige may come. How- 
ever, the supervisor is to be commended for even what was 
half done, and we live in hope he may yet see fit to ac- 
complish the part unfinished, but 

Mr. McLeran. how come you so late in the game to 
unloose your violent invectives anent salarv increases? Was 
this tardy outburst the child of attrition? Among others, 
in your own office, right under your proboscis, wasn't a 
certain clerk, — a former political appointee — given a fat 
raise a few days prior to your exhibit of holy anger, and 
did you utter a peep against it? How so? And there are 
others — non-civil service." of course, and, therefore, unhelp- 
ful in the political game — who likewise are favored of the 
supervisorial gods; these, we understand, are possessed of 
a certain assumed, potential or actual political prestige; 
had this aught to do with your gentle forebearance? 

So. while admiring your skill a-fishing for minnows, we 
urge upon you to barken to ambition's call : sally forth onto 
the deep, sharpen up the old harpoon, and shoot 'er into 
the school of big fellows, for, thar they blow! 

O'Dowd on Alienists 

"Faith an' O'Dowd, an' did ye iver hear av sich nin- 
sinse as is go'in' on about these ailynists an' phwhat they 
say about insanity?'' 

"Daid an' Oi haven't, O'Kane. an' Oi'm beginnin' to think 
no wail's safe or unsafe wid these docthors agin ye or wid 
ye." 

"But is there innything to the whole dom business, 
O'Dowd?" 

"More thin ye drame av, O'Kane. aven if ye're not on 
thrial. D'ye know. John, but Oi vvuz thinkin' the other 
noight that Oi've blamed mesilf fur lots av rashcality in 
me younger days — an' tole it in confission an' got a good 
jolt av a pinnance fur me throuble — that Oi now think Oi 
wuzn't to blame fur?" 

"An' if ve did it, why wuzn't ye to blame fur it, 
O'Dowd?"" 

"An' Oi till ye < >i wuzn't O'Kane, fur thin Oi didn't know 
phwhat the docthors in Checago are now ixplinin' wid sich 
great skill, an' that is this: Wan av the docthors — the wan 
who. for all his learnin' an' the risks he's takin' in givin' 
tistemony, gits but two hundred an' fifty dollars a day an' 
soide ixpenses — this wan has a way av ixplainin' how Oi'm 
not guilty av phwhat Oi did; that after Oi did it me soul 
wuz as clane av it as on the day av me baptism. Fur in- 



stance, the noight Oi bate up Kelly — an' he up to that 
toime an' afther. me bist friend — this Checago ailynist. Dr. 
Gleuck, the other day ixplained that aven had Oi kilt Kelly, 
it wud be due ( Oi have it here in the paper) 'to a profound 
patty logical dischord whereby intellectuality oriented be- 
yant immotions.' So, that bein' the case — phwhativer it 
is — Dr. Gleuck would shay av me, as he said in the thrial, 
that (Oi'll rade it fur ye) 'part av the sphlit personality 
juxtypoisitioned itself agin the immotional'; so, Oi'm think- 
in' the docthor'd say that's why Oi nearly kilt Kelly, 
phwhat ?" 

"Oi dunno phwhat it all manes, O'Dowd, but if ve think 
the docthor's roight. how's it Kelly bate the devil out av 
ye the noight afther ye bate him ?" 

"Well, O'Kane, Oi'm moinded the docthor'd ixplain that 
be savin' phwhat he siz here. Listen : 'These two pattylog- 
ical parrynoid personalities arre shiftable.' That manes, 
O'Kane, that the noight he bate me up so they hisitated 
whither it wuz the morgue or the hospital they'd sind me 
to, Kelly, as Docthor Gleuck wud ixplain, wuz 'invilloped' 
in that part av me 'sphlit personality' which wuz the 'im- 
motion' that made me go afther Kelly the noight before. 
D'ye understhand, O'Kane?" 

"An' Oi don't O'Dowd. an' Oi'll not, fur there's no sinse 
to it at all." 

"An' there's not, O'Kane? Wud they be payin' the doc- 
thor two hundred an' fifty a day an' ixpenses an' there 
bein' nothin' to it?" 

"Oi dunno; but is the judge listenin' to all av thim big 
wurrds and knowin' phwhat they mane, O'Dowd?" 

"He is, < )'Kane. an' bein' a smart man, praps he an' 
some av the spishial wroiters av the noosepapers, who 
seem to be so moved be the ividence, are learnin' phwhat 
nobody ilse seems to be understandin'. Toime will till, O'- 
Kane, but there's wan thing Oi'm beginnin' to foind out me- 
silf an' it's this: it's a dom harrd thing nowdays to know 
whither ye're insane or not; if ye say ye're not, the aily- 
nists kin prove ve are; if ye say ye are. the ailynists kin 
prove ve're not; if ye can git a good ailynist an' show 
him it's worth two-fifty a day to him. this iminint man 
kin. be wurrkin' a bit harder, prove ye're both insane and 
not insane at the same toime." 

* * * 

— Two of the cheeriest lies of the week: (1) She. to her 
affianced: "My ankles are not so thick as Grace's, are they 
Frank?" 

"I don't know, dearest. I've never looked at yours or 
hers." 

(2) Said Dr. William llealy. "eminent pschiatrist" of 
Boston, testifying for Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb, 
murderers: "When 'Dickey' and 'Babe' planned to kidnap 
young Franks, theirs were but the minds of mere children; 
but, once they had possession of the little boy. their minds 
became those of supermen"! 

* * * 

— The other day Schoolmaster Joseph Gvvynn arranged 
a nice little meet for boy applicants to join the farmer 
classes at Davis Agricultural School. No one showed up, 
thereby proving Mr. Gwynn a poor judge of boyish per- 
sonality. With two months' vacation, additional recessings. 
student athletics, drills, theatricals, target shooting, etc.. 
etc., the lads can't see their way to join the dismal refrain: 
"The farmer's life is the life for me." 



MART HERETH CAROLINE JONES 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30, 
and tea from 3 to 5 



^?S£d>^ 334 SUTTER STREET Douglas 7118 




August 16, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Making Politics a Noble Profession 

By Eleanore F. Ross 

?? 1YT US - PARKER MADDUX said something to me 
1TA once that will always remain with me, as a sort 
of clarion call to my better self 'Make politics a noble pro- 
fessii m !' " 

. Tallant Tubbs. young Republican candidate for State- 
Senator, paused a moment, to smile and say a few words 
to a clerk who had left some papers on his desk for his 
signature, up in his office above the city's roar and clangor, 
and then turned to me again : 

"It is always. I suppose, a temptation to a man cam- 
paigning for any particular office, to maneuver for certain 
advantages, in his run for the goal, as a horse is 'jockeyed' 
for position; he will go any lengths to bring about the 
desired result; he will even promise to carry out definite 
plans, though lie may. at heart, feel these plans are mis- 
taken ones. He will, against his better nature and judg- 
ment, 'play the game,' and the result is that politics, by 
the ordinarily decent man or woman, is called 'a rotten 
game.' 

"That is why so many of our best citizens today, when 
asked if they have voted, answer: 'Why no! I haven't reg- 
istered for years ! Politics are too rotten for me !' 

"Well, you know, politics are just as rotten or as fine 
as we make them. There is no reason why a man. standing 
for everything that goes toward the dignity and de- 
cency of an office, should not have as good a show, or 
better, than the man who is 'playing to the gallery,' or is 
being pulled hither and yon by certain interests or organi- 
zations. In my fight for senatorship," concluded Mr. Tubbs 
modestly but earnestly. "I am determined to earn votes 
only by ray own individual efforts and worth." 

The following are a few of the names registered in the 
"Tubbs for Senator Organization,'' of which Mrs. Julius 
Kahn is 1st vice president: 

Alan C. Van Fleet (president). George J. Hatfield (sec- 
retary). Major A. E. Graupner, Dr. Mariana Bertola. Al- 
fred Sutro, Mrs. A. S. Baldwin. 0. M. Goldaracena, Mrs. 
Henry J. Crocker, Capt. F. H. Ainsworth, Mrs. Chas. Minor 
Cooper, Frank Ghisselli. Emilio Torre, Jos. Baldacci, Jos- 
eph O. Tobin, and scores of others, representing varied 
walks of life in San Francisco. 




The Municipal Railway 

We have repeatedly referred to the fact that the Muni- 
cipal Railway would be placed in a far better position than 
it occupies today if the merger with the Market Street 
system were effected as quickly as it may be possible. As 
it is today it is folly to expect the Municipal Railway to be 
a splendid example of how a city may profitably operate 
a street car system. The trouble is that the Municipal Rail- 
way is not a system, but just a piece of the system, and 
it will not be a system until it owns and operates every mile 
of the Market Street s\ stem and every one of the system's 
cars. It is expected that there will be obstacles placed in 
the way of bringing about such a merger as the super- 
visors have decided upon. There are political and other 
reasons why such delays should occur, but if a serious 
endeavor were made by the city to merge the two lines. 
these delays would soon be disposed of and we would have 
one of the best systems in the world all operated under one 
management. 



— Not satisfied with having her hair bobbed, the wife of 
a Minneapolis physician had what remained of her lux- 
uriant tresses bleached. She was so surprised at her appear- 
ance when the transformation was completed that she im- 
mediately took a dose of poison. It is usually the husband 
or lover who wants to do this when he sets his first look 
at the wonderful apparition of his bobbed love. 



"A BOOK OF VERSES" 

Ruby Boardman, young California poet, modestly names 
her little volume of poems which has been published in 
I'aris by the [mprimerie Uuiverselle, 48, Rue Claude- Velle- 
faux. simply; "Verses." We call to mind other poets who 
have bestowed ambitious apellations upon editions contain- 
ing their brain children, with not half the talent which is 
demonstrated in Miss Boardman's efforts. Miss Boardman 
is the daughter of W. F. Boardman of this city. Following 
are a few of her verses : 

The Sister 
"I am young." said the Sister, "though my hands 
Are as twisted as the hands that hung 
On Calvary. Yet Madame understands 
That I am young." 

Why did she speak of her youth — I ask it — 
As of a grace that she valued most? 
A pure, pale jewel, shut in a casket, 
And the key lost. 

Carnival 

Pallid face and scarlet lips 
Has Pierrot. 

Flapping sleeves with finger tips 
Peeping through. 
Tasseled shoes on noiseless feet, 
Ruff and skull cap, all complete. 
Fanciful, grotesquely sweet 
Pierrot. 

Gay and thoughtless, though he seem. 
Well I know- 
Life's a sorry sort of dream 
To Pierrot. 

Tears have blanched his cheeks awhile. 
Blood has stained his mocking smile, 
Who but pays the price of guile 
Pierrot? 

Mermaiden 
She rose from the deep, her throat agleam 
Like the polished prow of a pleasure ship. 
Her hair flowed down in a sunny stream. 
Clung to the iridescent hip. 
The scaley thigh, the sinuous tail. 
In bright disguise of a thing profane; 
A cloak thrown over aquatic mail 
And flaunted with disdain. 
Green-eyed and glistening, coral-lipped, 
Smiling an enigmatic smile. 
She rose on the crest of a wave, and slipped 
Lightly ashore; there lay awhile 
Motionless on the sun-warmed sands. 
With somnolent body, scattered locks. 
And chin cupped in her pearly hands. 
She drowsed by the ruddy rocks. 

Henner 

A dream of moonlight, of mysterious flesh. 
White-glowing 'gainst a sombreness of green. 
A dream, of quiet waters, star-reflecting. 
Of hushed midnight. 

Cold ecstacy, flung on the open meadow. 
Crouched in the shadowy undergrowth of tree> 
Possessing the bloodless limbs of a dryad 
Deep in the grass. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 16, 1924 



OFFICES 

The Holbrook Building 



58 SUTTER STREET 

A Strictly First-Class Office Building 

Agent Room 411 



Exceptional Summer Sale 
of Attractive Lamps 

Electric table lamps for the living room — bed room 

— library 

Extremely low prices — and a free flash light with 

every purchase 

HETTY BROS. 

372 Ellis Street Prospect 333 



Municipal and Public Utility BONDS 

HELLER, BRUCE & CO. 

Mills Building, San Francisco 
Fhone— Douglas 2 244 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance 
Company in America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE. WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



ARTHUR C. THORNTON 

GENERAL INSURANCE BROKER 
Fire, Liability, Automobile, Surety Bonds, Etc. 
Losses Given Personal Attention 
51» California Street. Phone Sutter 32o 



*- 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 
RTVETEn STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, FLUMES, 
PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 
San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market St. 6717 Santa Fe Ave. 



SANITARY DRINKING WATER 

For Homes. OfBces aud Factories. Quality Guaranteed 

KEYSTONE WATER COMPANY 

130 Russ St. Phone Hemlock 170 San Francisco 



ARE YOUR BRAKES SAFE? 

We Specialize on Brakes Only. Flat Prices on All Cars 

S. F. BRAKE SERVICE 
ST. FRANCIS QAPAGB, 1240 POST STREET 

Between Van Ness Ave. and Franklin Street 
Phone Prospect 1015 






IjriNANCIAU 

By P. N. Beringer 

NEARLY every loss sustained by the public is a retriev- 
able one. The losses inflicted on this state through the 
carelessness of people or through the malicious attempts 
of the I. W. W. or others are irretrievable losses in a finan- 
cial sense. It is therefore necessary for everyone to try 
to the uttermost to prevent fires of any kind taking place 
and this applies with especial force to fires in forests. 

The state has suffered much loss this year. It has been 
one of the dryest of the dry years and the careless 
cigarette smoker is responsible for most of the big forest 
fires that have raged. The Southern Pacific Company, in 
conjunction with the state and the Federal authorities, is 
fighting fires along its lines and through this very capable 
assistance fires have been fought practically and many sub- 
dued before any great damage was done. 

* .+ * 

A Big Fall Travel 

Travel to and from California did not come up to the 
expectations of the several passenger departments of the 
various rail lines but the Santa Fe is getting ready to 
handle record business this coming autumn and winter. It 
is predicted that an unprecedented number of people are 
coming this way in order to look over the country with a 
view of settling here. The Santa Fe passenger department 
will take advantage of the fact and will provide every fa- 
cility to those who come here over their lines. C. L. Sea- 
grave, the colonizing agent of the Santa Fe, sends out word 
Erom his Chicago office, to which he has just returned, alter 
an extended trip in California and other states, that the 
farmer movement to California will be the largest on rec- 
ord. 

* * * 

The Convention Habit. 

Every convention of a commercial or other nature held 
in this city is part of a big financial gain made by the city 
and the state. The recently held convention of furniture 
men gave the trade at wholesale and retail an impulse it 
could not have obtained in any other way. It was directly 
of benefit to all who are in the furniture business and it 
was also of untold benefit to all of the collateral lines. There 
is no way in which the financial benefit to the community 
may be reckoned in dollars and cents but it is undeniably 
so that everyone benefited through the attendance of the 
furniture women and men at the convention in this city. 

* * * 

Head of Steel Company Predicts 

It has come to be an almost accepted fact that the Presi- 
dential Elections Year is usually a year of poor business. 
( )t course, there is no good reason on which to base this 
belief today. In years gone by when the political issues 
submerged business ami everyone turned his individual at- 
tention to a berating of the other fellow and his beliefs 
it was different and business did suffer greatly thereby. 
Today no such thing occurs and one vear is much the 
same as another except where business reasons prevent 
business being done. This vear there is less reason than 
usual to be found in politics as an interference in business. 
Evidently Mr. Gary, the head of the United States Steel 
Company, is of my belief. He goes much farther than any 
other business man would dare go, however, for he pre- 
dicts prosperity to come to us in November. Thank you. 
Mr. Gary, and we hope that you are right about il. 



August 16, l'L'4 



AND CALIFORNIA AD\ I k I [SER 



11 



Comment on Foreign Affairs f 

FRANCE and Italy have come to tin- conclusion that 
the amended American Plan, which is the Dawes Com- 
mittee plan changed to suit changing conditions, is just 
about right in every particular ami have so notified the 
London commission, which is considering the reparations 
question. Great Britain, it seems, will also accept the 
Dawes Plan, as amended, and the rest of the statesmen 
may lie depended upon to quickly bring the consideration 
of reparations to a close. 

Germany is sitting in with the consultants, but it is as 
yet by no means certain that she will without a lot of ar- 
gument accept what the others are ready to put into mo- 
tion so as to help and force Germany to stand on her own 
le.sjs financially. 

The boundary dispute between North Ireland and the 
Irish Free State goes merrily on and it may be necessary 
for Great Britain's wise men to take a hand in the con- 
troversy before it may be settled to anybody's satisfaction, 
ami the prospect is that after Great Britain has tried ear- 
nestly to bring things to a satisfactory conclusion that noth- 
ing will be satisfactory for very long. Whenever religious 
differences and political opinions are ranged the one com- 
bination against the other, just such results may be ex- 
pected. 

France is busily engaged developing her vast African 
empire. No one who has given this any attention at all 
may fail from noting that France is today one of the big- 
gest colonizers the world has ever known. Her African 
possessions are almost as large as those of England. One 
of the most significant facts arising out of the expansion 
of France in the colonizing line is the ability the French 
have shown in so thoroughly winning the people who are 
natives of the various colonies in all parts of the world in 
loyalty to the French flag. 

Strange as it may seem, the power given the so-called 
laborites in England has not brought about any degree 
of cohesion among those warring parties that one would 
most naturally think would occur. The statement of 
the foreign representative that he did not see much of 
the officials of Great Britain because they were, most of 
them, busily trving on silk stockings, seems to be borne 
out in many directions. The success of Ramsay MacDon- 
akl and his party has served principally to split the radi- 
cals of all shades of color into these various shades and 
that is about all. MacDonald's government is a strong 

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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 16, 1924 




BUSY CUPID 

MISS <U,ICE REQUA, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Lawrence 
Requa of Piedmont, and Coy Filmer of San Francisco were 
married at the Interdenominational Church Tuesday after- 
noon in the presence of more than 400 relatives and friends. 
The ceremony was in all respects one of the most beautiful 
and dignified that society has witnessed this season. An at- 
mosphere of beauty and quietude prevaded the blossom-laden 
little chapel. The best man. Russell Wilson, and the ushers. 
Messrs Lawrence Renua. William A. Magee Jr., Douglas Al- 
exander. John Henry Russell, George Filmer Jr.. Leon Brooks 
Walker. Covington Janin, J. LeRoy Nickel and Tallant Ti.bbs. 
assembled at the altar, and the bridal party proceeded down 
the a'sle The bridesmaids entered first. These were the 
Misses Mary Julia Crocker. Edna Taylor. Eleanor Spreck- 
eles Aileen Mcintosh. Edith Grant, Helen Stanford, Mrs. 
Salem Pohlman and Mrs. Lawrence Requa. Following the 
bridesmaids came Miss Jessica Knowles, the maid of honor 
Mrs. John Henry Russell, the bride's sister, was matron ot 
honor At the conclusion of the ceremony the bridal paity 
and a hundred or more friends repaired to Greystone, the 
Requa home in the Piedmont hills, where a reception was 
held and a wedding supper was served. The marriage of 
Miss Requa and Mr. Filmer united two of the oldest and most 
prominent families in California. 

MR A.ND MRS. ARTHUR DALE KING have announced the en- 
gagement of their daughter. Miss Geraldine King, to Win- 
ston Stuart Cowgill. son of Mrs. Frank Sayre Cowgill and 
the late Mr. Cowgill of Chicago and Omaha. The wedding 
date has not been definitely settled, but the marriage is 
planned to take place in the near future. 

MISS BARBARA BEARDSLEY has chosen the attendants for 
her marriage to Mr. Gregory Harrison, which will be sol- 
emnized in this city on September ft. The ceremony will be 
held at 4 o'clock in the afternoon at Star of the Sea Church 
There will be no reception afterwards. Miss Beardsley will 
be attended as matron of honor by her bridegroom's sister, 
Mrs Charles W. Cobb, and her cousin, Miss Kate Boardman, 
will' be the maid of honor. The bridesmaids will include Miss 
Merrill Jones. Miss Caroline Madison. Miss Elizabeth Lees. 
Miss Elizabeth Harrison, Miss Carol Klink and Miss De- 
borah Pentz. Mr. Edward Harrison will be his brothers 
best man. 

MISS ELIZABETH HOUSTON, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Albert 
J Houston, was married to Browning Smith, son of Norwood 
Smith Jr., of Palo Alto, the marriage having taken place re- 
cently in San Jose. 

LUNCHEONS 

MRS CHARLES P. OVERTON entertained a a luncheon party 
at Menlo Park recently for Mrs. Charles Nebeker, her niece, 
who, with her little daughter, Victoria, and her brother. Cap- 
tain Overton Walsh, are visitors at the Overton home. Mrs. 
Nebeker was Miss Virginia Walsh before her marriage. 

MAJOR AND MRS. CHARLES E. FREEMAN assembled fifty or 
more friends at a beautifully arranged luncheon party at their 
Fort McDowell home recently, when they honored Colonel 
Frank J. Morrow, the popular retiring commander of the 
post, and Colonel George Gateley, his successor. 

MRS. HARRY EAST MILLER, who will leave next week for 
Europe with her husband, is the incentive for many parties 
on both sides of the bay. Mrs. Harry H. Fair gave a lunch- 
eon Wednesday afternoon for her at the Town and Country 
Club. Thursday Mrs. Victor Metcalfe gave her a luncheon. 
Friday Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Rawlings were dinner hosts in 
honor of Mr. and Mrs. Miller, and Friday afternoon Mrs. 
George Rodolph gave a luncheon for the matron. Next week 
Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Miller will preside at a dinner in their 
honor on Tuesday, and on Wednesday Mrs. Prentiss Selby 
will give Mrs. Miller a luncheon at the Town and Country 
Club. Mrs. Edward Lacy Brayton will compliment them at 
a dinner Thursday at her home across the bay. 



MRS. SIGMUND STERN has invited a number of friends to 
luncheon at the Stern home in Menlo Park Sunday. The 
affair is being given in honor of the hostess' mother-in-law, 
Mrs. Elsie Stern, who is visiting here from Paris. 

MRS. ROY BISHOP gave a small luncheon at Menlo Park re- 
cently at the Richard Girvin house, which she is occupying 
for the summer, complimenting Mrs. W. B. Simpson of New 
York, the house guest of Mrs. Robert Moore. 

MRS. CHARLES BROWN gave a luncheon a few days ago at her 

home in San Mateo, complimenting Mrs. Charles Lyman. 

TEAS 

MRS. STUART VER MEHR was hostess at a tea at her apart- 
ment at the Casa Madrone, when she honored Mrs. John Malan 
ver Mehr. Mrs. ver Mehr had assisting her in the duties of 
hostess Mrs. George Hellmann and Miss Alice Yoell. 

MRS. PUTMON MATTHEWS gave a tea on Friday at her home 
in Berkeley. It was a farewell to Mrs. Charles Mills Gayley, 
who with Professor Gayley and their daughter, Miss Betty 
Gayley, will soon leave for London. 

MRS. S. LOUISE BEE of San Francisco is at Santa Barbara visit- 
ing, and she recently appeared as the figure of interest at a 
tea given for her by her son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and 
Mrs. Albert W. Bee, on the occasion of her ninety-fourth birth- 
day. 

BRIDGE 

MISS HELEN PERKINS, bride-elect of Mr. Carl Stever, was com- 
plimented by Mrs. Christopher Trowbridge Jr. with a bridge 
tea Wednesday afternoon. The party was held at the home 
of the hostess in Clay street. 

MRS. CLAUDE W. COLONNA (Louise Braden) entertained a 
small group of friends from Mare Island at her attractive 
apartment in Vallejo recently, inviting them for an informal 
bridge and tea. 

DIXXERS 

MR. AND MRS. TIMOTHY HEALY were hosts at an informal 
dinner party at their home on Broadwav Monday evening. 

MR. AND MRS. ERNEST R. FOLGER had a small family din- 
ner party at their home on Buchanan street, marking their 
twenty-seventh wedding anniversary. 

CAPTAIN AND MRS. FRANK OGDEN entertained informally 
for a group of their friends at Fort McDowell recently, hav- 
ing as their guests Colonel and Mrs. George G. Batley, the 
new commandant at McDowell, and his wife. Colonel Frank J. 
Morrow, Major and Mrs. R. H. Creel and Major and